Extended Audio Sample

Download Three Soldiers Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Three Soldiers Audiobook, by John Dos Passos Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.73 out of 53.73 out of 53.73 out of 53.73 out of 53.73 out of 5 3.73 (33 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Dos Passos Narrator: George Guidall Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2016 ISBN: 9781461810117
Regular Price: $29.99 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

When John Dos Passos published this book in 1921, its explosive portrait of World War I shocked America. Instead of glorifying the Great War, he shows three men caught in a military machine that is as dangerous for them as the foreign terrain and the enemies they fight. Fuselli leaves San Francisco for the front lines in France, anxious to move up the military ladder of success. Chrisfield, a farm boy from Indiana, feels himself swept along as he marches in a sea of other soldiers. And Andrews, a classical musician, searches for a sense of direction and meaning as he joins the ranks. Each will be swallowed up and changed forever by a vast, faceless automaton-the Army. Based on Dos Passos' own experiences as an ambulance driver in Europe during World War I, Three Soldiers is honored as a classic antiwar novel. Sweeping in its scope and drama, it is riveting historical fiction. Veteran narrator George Guidall's reading conveys all the conflicts and emotions that bombard the three recruits. Download and start listening now!

c6hv

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 2/2/2014

    " John Dos Passos is an author whom I had never read before but I am most assuredly happy to have found his works. "Three Soldiers" is an exceptionally well written book which gives the reader a fabulous look inside the emotional side of being a soldier during WWI. I hate spoilers so all I will say is that it is well worth your reading! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 D.H. Benson | 1/31/2014

    " I first read this book in high school because no one in my English class wanted to read it. I don't think the book had ever been checked out from the library. I recently re-read the book and enjoyed the book even more. The book focuses on three American infantrymen in World War I. We tend to associate anti-military sentiment with the Vietnam War but this books shows these feelings existed long before the American involvement in Southeast Asia. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Namrirru | 1/20/2014

    " This is my favorite book on war I have ever read, which says a lot since I hate war and I generally don't like books on it. Hemingway, eat your heart out! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim Weakley | 1/20/2014

    " My first experience with Dos Passos and I am looking forward to reading 1919 now. It really reminded me of The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, not in subject but in outlook and desperation of character. Each of the three soldiers ends up in his own desperate straits and finds their own way to a conclusion. What happens to them during the war and how their inner fortitude or lack of it help or hinder their progress makes for a heartbreaking story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carol Rizzardi | 1/1/2014

    " I can see why this book was controversial in its time -- it certainly does not glorify the war experience! It's similar to One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in that it emphasizes the way the "machine," in this case, the machinery of war and government, destroys men's spirits. A worthy read, but not one I particularly enjoyed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lars | 12/31/2013

    " Dos Passos's novel of American soldiers serving in the "Great War" eschews depictions of combat, but delivers an indictment of the bereaucracy, paternalism and jingoistism of military culture. The story of John Andrews is the main thread of the "Three Soldeirs," but his experience is given context and depth alongside the diverging paths of his early companions, Dan Fuselli and Chris Chrisfield. That Andrews was a musician before the war is key, emphasizing the aspects of human militarization that strip the tender and sympathetic aspects of man's nature in favor of his raw physical abilities. With Andrews, we feel not only the loss of creative and expressive freedom, but of the self. Dos Passos' command of language is masterful, moderating conversations between voices of various linguistic, regional and cultural constructions, deftly capturing the various ways people talk and gesture. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrick | 12/17/2013

    " Pretty interesting anti-war book by Dos Passos. The story follows a few soldiers loosely in WW1. Focuses on the inanity and drudgery of war, repression of the human spirit etc. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Geoffrey | 12/4/2013

    " Disjointed and somewhat tedious. Not really a war novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia | 11/24/2013

    " I really enjoyed this book. I wouldn't recommend because of all the swear words but it shows the reality of war. But I read it for English class and it is packed with symbolism! It was one of the few papers that I actually enjoyed doing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 j.c. | 10/20/2013

    " My first Dos Passos - it's a year for firsts. Lives up to the hype. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carly Eikel | 10/14/2013

    " Mostly about the "machine" that is the military, turning men into mindless autonomic creatures who follow any and all orders. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joseph | 5/25/2013

    " Alongside Mailer's Naked and the Dead, this is one of the best books that deals with the psychological impact of war. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bruce Amaro | 4/23/2013

    " Not his best work, but readable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark | 1/28/2013

    " Superb writing by Dos Passos as he puts you in the mind of an artist trying to cope with life in the military. He wrote this in 1919 and his service in World War 1 was still burning fresh in his mind. The plot drags a little about 2/3 through but stick with it, there is a strong finish. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff Laughlin | 10/18/2012

    " I am enraptured by the way these characters view their worlds. It's unbelievable how great Dos Passos really was. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mjackman | 9/23/2012

    " A good writer takes a tale of World War I and turns it into something unexpected, something that turns ideas of who are the heroes and who are the enemies on its head. Well done. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Les Robinson | 9/17/2012

    " Hemmingway totally rips this off for A Farewell to Arms which isn't half as good as this one. A classic modern novel of WWI. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tim | 9/14/2012

    " Dos Passos hadn't found his voice yet, and "Three Soldiers" drags a bit, but it's a worthwhile sampling of an author whose best was yet to come. It's a classic only in the sense that his U.S.A. trilogy would be one, and all of Dos Passos' work would therefore become lumped into the "classics" pile. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Will | 7/4/2012

    " Probably 3.5. What is it about being a WWI ambulance driver/medical corps that made you a good writer? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zak | 5/1/2012

    " In this scintilating modernist novel, John Dos Passos continually bludgeons the reader with the astounding knowledge that being a soldier in World War I was actually fairly shitty. Not totally without merit, I just think it's not my cup of tea. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 4/19/2011

    " I am glad that I read it. It is a good book and a good one to have read, but there were large pieces where I felt that my mind was wondering off and needed to be pulled back into the story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrick | 4/6/2011

    " Pretty interesting anti-war book by Dos Passos. The story follows a few soldiers loosely in WW1. Focuses on the inanity and drudgery of war, repression of the human spirit etc. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Will | 9/27/2010

    " Probably 3.5. What is it about being a WWI ambulance driver/medical corps that made you a good writer? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 j.c. | 8/21/2010

    " My first Dos Passos - it's a year for firsts. Lives up to the hype. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark | 5/4/2010

    " Superb writing by Dos Passos as he puts you in the mind of an artist trying to cope with life in the military. He wrote this in 1919 and his service in World War 1 was still burning fresh in his mind. The plot drags a little about 2/3 through but stick with it, there is a strong finish. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mjackman | 7/9/2008

    " A good writer takes a tale of World War I and turns it into something unexpected, something that turns ideas of who are the heroes and who are the enemies on its head. Well done. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia | 5/13/2008

    " I really enjoyed this book. I wouldn't recommend because of all the swear words but it shows the reality of war. But I read it for English class and it is packed with symbolism! It was one of the few papers that I actually enjoyed doing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joseph | 4/19/2008

    " Alongside Mailer's Naked and the Dead, this is one of the best books that deals with the psychological impact of war. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Geoffrey | 3/21/2008

    " Disjointed and somewhat tedious. Not really a war novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Les | 3/12/2008

    " Hemmingway totally rips this off for A Farewell to Arms which isn't half as good as this one. A classic modern novel of WWI. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zak | 1/29/2008

    " In this scintilating modernist novel, John Dos Passos continually bludgeons the reader with the astounding knowledge that being a soldier in World War I was actually fairly shitty. Not totally without merit, I just think it's not my cup of tea. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jerff | 8/30/2007

    " I am enraptured by the way these characters view their worlds. It's unbelievable how great Dos Passos really was. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Namrirru | 7/17/2007

    " This is my favorite book on war I have ever read, which says a lot since I hate war and I generally don't like books on it. Hemingway, eat your heart out! "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author John Dos Passos

John Dos Passos (1896–1970), a member of the Lost Generation, published more than forty works of fiction and nonfiction, including Three Soldiers and Manhattan Transfer.

About the Narrator

George Guidall, winner of eighty-eight AudioFile Earphones Awards, has twice won the prestigious Audie Award for Excellence in Audiobook Narration. In 2014 the Audio Publishers Association presented him with the Special Achievement Award for an audiobook narrator of exceptional stature and accomplishment. During his thirty-year recording career he has recorded over 1,100 audiobooks, won multiple awards, been a mentor to many narrators, and shown by example the potential of fine storytelling. Among Guidall’s narration achievements are Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, and John Irving’s A Widow for One Year, which earned him an Audie Award for best unabridged narration of a novel, an honor he captured again for his rendition of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True. Guidall’s forty-year acting career includes starring roles on Broadway, an Obie Award for best performance off Broadway, and frequent television appearances.