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Download Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Thoughts Without a Thinker: Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Epstein
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,078 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Epstein Narrator: Mark Epstein Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2012 ISBN:
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Upon its first publication, this path breaking book launched an explosion of interest in how Eastern spirituality can enhance Western psychology. Since then, the worlds of Buddhism and psychotherapy have been forged into a revolutionary new understanding of what constitutes a healthy emotional life.

In his insightful introduction, Mark Epstein reflects on this revolution and considers how it is likely to evolve in the future.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allie | 2/15/2014

    " This book is great. Having been raised by buddhist leaning shrinks, it is in my language. It assumes a previous knowledge of psychotherapy, but I think it's half academic/ clinical text and half life advice for being a happier human. I recommend it to other thinkers. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Priscilla | 2/9/2014

    " Thought provoking. I found it difficult to concentrate on this book and often found myself rereading sentences, which I find ironic considering its main topic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shaina Miller | 2/5/2014

    " This is one of the most valuable books I own. This bridge of psychology and Buddhism proves brilliant and critical in the life of any spirituals living in the West. And, Epstein does it magically. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dayna | 2/4/2014

    " First recommended by my favorite therapist 10 years ago, I return to this book periodically as it offers a much appreciated medium between the sometimes aggravating question at the heart of psychoanalysis - "Why?" "Why?""Why?" and the patience, acceptance and attention to mind/body synthesis of eastern buddhist thinking. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charles Bivona | 1/24/2014

    " One of the most insightful marriages of Buddhism and Psychoanalysis I've read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gina | 1/23/2014

    " This is a good beginner book for the basic teachings of Buddhism combined with the benefits of psychotherapy. The book ends up emphasizing how by focusing on the "I" when experiencing negative or strong emotions, the thinker is able to see them from an outsider perspective. Ultimately, the book led me to another book, "The Path of Purification" (trans.), which I think will REALLY help me to delve into how to become detached from strong negative emotions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan | 1/7/2014

    " Wow. It definitely is a scientific read, but that parallels between science and spirituality in this are astounding! So enlightening! From the details of observation, mindfulness, meditation, and simply breathing out and in, all the way through the significance -- religiously, personally, scientifically, mentally, and physically -- of confronting your past, your demons, your memories, your hatreds, your insecurities, and your hearts TRUE desires, I was blown away with mind-opening insights are so easy to see every day. Experiencing terror without fear and delight without attachment; working to make the ego developed and simultaneously non-existent; refusing to allow yourself to fall into the Realm of the Hungry Ghosts; awareness, healing, ignorance, narcissism, emptiness, and bare attention -- what a study, what a pursuit of "discovering things as they truly are" with a cleansed eye, ready to see and accept humanity, yourself, others without the distorted perceptions that we all suffer but must work toward removing. Purely fascinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eduardo | 1/2/2014

    " Grateful to Epstein for demonstrating that a thing like mid-twentieth-century British psychoanalysis could be viscerally relevant. This book led to learning about Winnicot, and of course, Bion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren Rudisill | 12/23/2013

    " It was difficult to wrap my mind around the Buddhist Perspective on Psychology, it was a dense book but worth getting through. The concepts were interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 12/15/2013

    " Whoa Buddhism and therapy are like exactly the same thing. This book has funny stories and inspires mindfulness. The writer is really, really smart. This is a good companion to read with the Horney book as it made me feel hopeful about liking myself someday. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daisy | 11/27/2013

    " Good western translation of Buddhist psychology. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hannah | 11/16/2013

    " Comparison of Buddhist principles to modern therapy techniques "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 J. D. | 11/5/2013

    " If the opinions of an interested skeptic carry any weight at all, this is a convincing integration of Freudian theory with Buddhist practice and perception. I heartily recommended it to all those with an interest in either. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 lisa | 8/12/2013

    " Fantastic book - highly recommend to anyone interested in Buddhism, psychology, or understanding/taming your own brain! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Taylor Light | 7/9/2013

    " A bit repetitive, and a very shallow look at the complexities found in the Buddha's teachings. However, my review is dependent on the fact that I was reading the book to see how Epstein integrated Buddhism into his Psychotherapy practice, and I did not receive an in-depth answer to this "how." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vtholmes1 Holmes | 6/27/2013

    " A little more difficult to read as compared to "Going to Pieces....." but this is another keeper. A reference book.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda | 2/21/2013

    " One of the most amazing books I've read, a wonderful blend of psychology, anthropology, East/West. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sattman | 1/19/2013

    " This book was my first true taste of Buddhism. I especially love the intro and the bit about "hungry ghosts." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sigrun Hodne | 1/7/2013

    " Clear and very well written, precise on how meditation and psychotherapy can complement each other. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 gdg | 12/16/2012

    " If you do therapeutic work this is a must! Wow! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allisun | 12/11/2012

    " A fantastic and solidly written integration of Eastern thought and psychotherapy. I recommend it to therapists, clients, and friends. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan rogers | 11/18/2012

    " amazing look at the intersection of buddhist philosophy and pyschodynamic theory. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josie | 10/19/2012

    " I particularly loved the descriptions of buddhism....they really helped solidify the purpose of meditation. I'm less into psychotherapy, so that stuff wasn't as interesting to me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 9/23/2012

    " Excellent. Great. Read it and figure out what the hell you think between the thoughts. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jillian | 9/10/2012

    " Interesting for sure, but much denser and less dynamic than his later book "Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart." I'd give this book a 3 except that I really admire Epstein. But to be sure, he had me blinking a bit to stay awake. "

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About the Author

Mark Epstein, MD, is a psychiatrist in private practice and the author of Thoughts without a Thinker. He is a contributing editor to Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and clinical assistant professor of psychology at New York University. He lives in New York City.