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Download This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All Audiobook, by Marilyn Johnson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,581 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Marilyn Johnson Narrator: Hillary Huber Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2010 ISBN: 9781400186341
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Buried in information? Cross-eyed over technology? From the bottom of a pile of paper and discs, books, e-books, and scattered thumb drives comes a cry of hope: Make way for the librarians! They want to help. They're not selling a thing. And librarians know best how to beat a path through the googolplex sources of information available to us, writes Marilyn Johnson, whose previous book, The Dead Beat, breathed merry life into the obituary-writing profession. This Book Is Overdue! is a romp through the ranks of information professionals and a revelation for readers burned out on the cliches and stereotyping of librarians. Blunt and obscenely funny bloggers spill their stories in this book, as do a tattooed, hard-partying children's librarian; a fresh-scrubbed Catholic couple who teach missionaries to use computers; a blue-haired radical who uses her smartphone to help guide street protestors; a plethora of voluptuous avatars and cybrarians; the quiet, law-abiding librarians gagged by the FBI; and a boxing archivist. These are just a few of the visionaries Johnson captures here-pragmatic idealists who fuse the tools of the digital age with their love for the written word and the enduring values of free speech, open access, and scout-badge-quality assistance to anyone in need. Those who predicted the death of libraries forgot to consider that in the automated maze of contemporary life, none of us-neither the experts nor the hopelessly baffled-can get along without human help. And not just any help; we need librarians who won't charge us by the question or roll their eyes, no matter what we ask. Who are they? What do they know? And how quickly can they save us from being buried by the digital age? Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • This is one of those books, in the vein of Mary Roach's Stiff, that tackle a big topic by taking [listeners] on a chapter-by-chapter tour of eccentric characters and unlikely locations. The New York Times

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Connie | 1/27/2014

    " It was OK. I don't remember any of it so only 2 stars. If I had disliked it I would've remembered that, too. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 elita | 1/12/2014

    " She signed this for me at FLA! Enjoying it so far. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John Uzzi | 1/9/2014

    " I found this an interesting and surprising look at how libraries are evolving while librarians adopt new tools to fulfill their long standing mission. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jillian | 12/22/2013

    " anyone wanna spot me the money to go to grad school? i wanna be a librarian so badly it hurts sometimes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sharlene | 12/15/2013

    " Aside from librarians, librarians in training, and those with a librarian fetish, many people would probably never think to check out a title that focuses solely on librarianship. In my experience (and Johnson's as well), most individuals are content with the librarian stereotype- old fashioned (or just plain old), meek, and unsociable with tidy buns and an aversion to technology. "You need a Masters to be a librarian?!" is the typical response when stating that you went to grad school to get your MLIS. We are a mysterious and, according to some, endangered breed. Lucky for us, Johnson enthusiastically explores the reality of librarianship and the larger than life characters at the front lines of this constantly evolving field.While many (librarian) reviewers were dissatisfied with the level of comprehensiveness of the book (it is not comprehensive at all- it takes delicious bites out of an ever-expanding field of work), others praised Johnson's anecdotal style. Some complain that we never do learn HOW librarians and cybrarians can save us all. We might not, but we do learn about the challenges and victories experienced by librarians that indirectly and directly affect our lives (and maybe even democracy as we know it). For example, Johnson tells the story of the Connecticut librarians who (with support from the American Civil Liberties Union) stood up against the federal government to defend their patrons' privacy against the Patriot Act. They likened seizing patrons' library records to spying on people in voting booths. They won....though the Patriot Act remains. I did enjoy this book (not just as a librarian but as a lover of miscellaneous information), and I learned about new, innovative uses for technology in my field of work (like digital libraries popping up all over Second Life). On the flip side, Johnson is prone to generalizations (we're not all cat lovers), and the content of the book is disorganized. It's difficult to keep track of the overarching theme besides perhaps this idea that librarians really ARE awesome and have something to offer you besides musty old books and constant shushing. And Johnson proves that they do. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael | 12/10/2013

    " Okay, I appreciate what Johnson was trying to do here and this book would be very good for someone who had no idea how valuable librarians can be. But this book is waaayyyy too short and waaayyy too unfocused to get into the nitty-gritty details that need to be delved into. How is she going to dedicate so much space to librarians playing Second Life and then hardly touch on things like collection development and outreach? It just seems like kind of a missed opportunity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanne | 12/4/2013

    " Anyone working in a library should read this book - lots of fun information and food for thought. I especially liked the sections on privacy and freedom of information. Also, I don't think anyone at our library has had any run-ins with "rogue poop" - at least, not yet :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Iris | 11/23/2013

    " Checked out and read in one day, and re-inspired me to go after the MLIS. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gretchen Rings | 10/14/2013

    " Inspiring, funny, and informative. It was also really nice to read an appreciation of librarians. Thank you Marilyn Johnson! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristiana | 4/23/2013

    " Back to work and back to reading. This was a nice quick read filled with humour and insight into the changing world of libraries, librarians and library patrons. Johnson looks at Second Life, the problem with archives and the digital era and an array of other topics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danny | 3/16/2013

    " It was fun to listen to a book where someone was talking about what I do, and topics about which I have opinions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeanne | 2/3/2013

    " Yes, this book is reference-focused, but I still found it an inspiring read. Kind of got me jazzed about the profession again. This is not to say that I'm aggressively hitting the job market, but I do recommend that my librarian friends read this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 G | 9/14/2012

    " A witty introduction to the modern twist on librarianship, although it's maybe a little too optimistic. Still, it's definitely fun. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lacy | 8/2/2012

    " An outsider's look at the library profession. Johnson covered the future direction of libraries well with chapters on Second Life and born digital projects. Pretty good overview for someone curious about what goes on behind the black rectangular glasses! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 April | 6/29/2012

    " Too cheeky for my taste. And, Johnson's judgements aren't sly enough for this book to actually be considered an homage to librarians, cybrarians, and libraries. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kareemah | 4/30/2012

    " we librarians are a fiesty group and can be dangerous "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Beth | 4/23/2012

    " Why anyone would want to read this is beyond me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 donna | 3/10/2012

    " Thank you, Marilyn, for making me proud to be a librarian. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nicole | 2/26/2012

    " For any aspiring librarians/archivists/info techs out there...very informative and the kind of geeky stuff we like. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marjorie Elwood | 12/28/2011

    " A very positive look at librarians and how we change the world. I thought there was a little too much emphasis on Second Life libraries but the author did a good job of writing about a variety of aspects of library work and of championing the profession. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Roseann | 11/27/2011

    " A book every librarian, or book lover should at least take a look at as it covers all modes of librarians (from demure to cyber to sexy) and what their jobs actually entail. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mecque | 5/13/2011

    " Yay. This book made me so proud to be studying librarianship. I particularly liked the story of the online international graduate school. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Juliana | 5/8/2011

    " Eclectic little book celebrating today's librarians. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William | 5/3/2011

    " Well, this book seems dated now even more so than usual. As a connected librarian, I knew these people and movements long ago. This is what we do, so what's the news? A book best intended for non-librarians or those unaware librarians in the profession who need some inspiration. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sheryl | 4/26/2011

    " I have not gotten a chance to check it out, but the idea of consulting a virtual librarian in Second Life is fascinating. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Bretta | 4/25/2011

    " Yuck! Waste of money and brain power to read it :( "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katie | 4/19/2011

    " Spent waaaaay too much time on second life and the way librarians themselves are changing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirby | 4/18/2011

    " Really it's 2.5 stars. I think if I would have listened/read this while I was still in library school I would have liked it more...it felt a little "preaching to the choir" as I listened to it now. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Edmund | 4/7/2011

    " Very interesting, but a slow read.

    Does make me want to study library science.

    I do love libraries.

    Ironically, my copy of the book from the library is overdue.

    Going to return with it half done, and finish later.

    ed "

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About the Author
Author Marilyn Johnson

Marilyn Johnson is a former editor and writer for Life, Esquire, and Outside magazines, and lives with her husband, Rob Fleder, in New York's Hudson Valley.

About the Narrator

Hillary Huber, a Los Angeles–based voice talent with hundreds of commercials and promos under her belt, was bitten by the audiobook bug in 2005. She now records books on a regular basis and has been nominated for several Audie Awards and won ten Earphones Awards. Her recordings for Blackstone include Skinny Bastard, The Art of Social War, and The Cheater.