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Download The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World’s Greatest Encyclopedia Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World’s Greatest Encyclopedia Audiobook, by Andrew Lih Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (174 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Andrew Lih, Lloyd James Narrator: Lloyd James Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2009 ISBN: 9781400180769
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With more than 2,000,000 individual articles on everything from Aa! (a Japanese pop group) to Zzyzx, California, written by an army of volunteer contributors, Wikipedia is the #8 site on the World Wide Web. Created (and corrected) by anyone with access to a computer, this impressive assemblage of knowledge is growing at an astonishing rate of more than 30,000,000 words a month. Now for the first time, a Wikipedia insider tells the story of how it all happened—from the first glimmer of an idea to the global phenomenon it’s become.

Andrew Lih has been an administrator at Wikipedia for more than four years, as well as a regular host of the weekly Wikipedia podcast. In The Wikipedia Revolution, he details the site’s inception in 2001, its evolution, and its remarkable growth, while also explaining its larger cultural repercussions. Wikipedia is not just a website; it’s a global community of contributors who have banded together out of a shared passion for making knowledge free. 

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Quotes & Awards

  • “An easy, nontech, intriguing read about a Web miracle that today rivals Encyclopaedia Britannica, according to well-respected publications, in the quality of many of its articles.”

    Booklist (starred review)

  • “Tracing Wikipedia’s evolution and expansion to international editions, Lih views the encyclopedia as a ‘global community of passionate scribes,’ attributing its success to a policy of openness which is ‘not so much technical phenomenon as social phenomenon.’”

    Publishers Weekly

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 1/17/2014

    " Quick informative read on the history of wikis and wikipedia that also touches on many web content developments in the last decade in an approachable way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jared | 12/26/2013

    " Everything you could ever want to know about Wikipedia - and more. A thorough overview. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 12/17/2013

    " An interesting historical perspective of the personalities and principles behind Wikipedia. Lih makes a clear argument for why Wikipedia is NOT the World's Greatest Encyclopedia however hard it might be trying. Fascinating information on foreign language Wikis. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ken | 11/2/2013

    " I "read" the audiobook edition. Interesting, though it goes too deeply into specific examples in detail of entries and arguments. It was unabridged, but I would have enjoyed an abridged version more. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joseph Young | 10/7/2013

    " Interesting at first, but mostly self-indulgent. Wish they had chosen an audio speaker actually familiar with some technical terms. Each of the times he used the pronunciation Sigh-sop for SysOp I cringed a little. The spelling out of ASCII was equally absurd. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Trever | 9/21/2013

    " Great book about the history of Wikipedia and their successes and failures. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 djcb | 5/14/2013

    " Interesting look into the first years of Wikipedia (until ca. 2008); lots of interesting anecdotes. Now, need a book for the years after that. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy | 1/25/2013

    " A very good (if a little bit dated) introduction to the history of Wikipedia. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Padraic | 7/10/2012

    " A reasonably good summary of Wikipedia's evolution, but doesn't offer much novel analysis. I could be biased due to being familiar with a lot of this material beforehand. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mireille | 9/6/2011

    " I really got a lot out of this book. It was informative and gave me a new respect for Wikipedia, both as a reference source and as a social experiment. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carrie F. | 8/29/2011

    " Wikipedia is really special the way it works with volunteers and is still standardized. And you really can change anything in it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joseph | 8/27/2010

    " Interesting at first, but mostly self-indulgent. Wish they had chosen an audio speaker actually familiar with some technical terms. Each of the times he used the pronunciation Sigh-sop for SysOp I cringed a little. The spelling out of ASCII was equally absurd.

    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 7/26/2010

    " An interesting historical perspective of the personalities and principles behind Wikipedia. Lih makes a clear argument for why Wikipedia is NOT the World's Greatest Encyclopedia however hard it might be trying. Fascinating information on foreign language Wikis. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ken | 4/3/2010

    " I "read" the audiobook edition. Interesting, though it goes too deeply into specific examples in detail of entries and arguments. It was unabridged, but I would have enjoyed an abridged version more. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jared | 10/2/2009

    " Everything you could ever want to know about Wikipedia - and more. A thorough overview. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Phil | 6/14/2009

    " If you're a web developer (Marissa!!!) you'll proabably love it. For the avearge person curious about how Wikipedia works, it's too much information, especially about it's early competitors.

    Seems well researched. Writing's a bit dry. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carrie | 6/4/2009

    " Wikipedia is really special the way it works with volunteers and is still standardized. And you really can change anything in it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob | 5/24/2009

    " This is an interesting review of the history of wikipedia, but one that is padded with a lot of tables, transcripts, etc.

    Told by a semi-insider, it chronicles the leaps and missteps involved in making wikipedia the phenomenon it is today.

    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Peter | 5/1/2009

    " OK. Not bad.

    I did like the comparison of Sanger's mgmt of the early wikipedia/nupedia with Wales'. There's definitely a lesson in there for those trying to herd the 2.0 cats, and keep them interested and contributing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Thirsty_Mind | 4/11/2009

    " A reasonably good summary of Wikipedia's evolution, but doesn't offer much novel analysis. I could be biased due to being familiar with a lot of this material beforehand. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 4/9/2009

    " Quick informative read on the history of wikis and wikipedia that also touches on many web content developments in the last decade in an approachable way. "

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About the Author

Andrew Lih spent ten years as an academic in new media and journalism at Columbia University and Hong Kong University. He has been an administrator at Wikipedia for over four years and a commentator on new media, technology, and journalism issues on CNN, MSNBC, and NPR. Lih is based in Beijing.

About the Narrator

Lloyd James (a.k.a. Sean Pratt) has been narrating since 1996 and has recorded over six hundred audiobooks. He is a seven-time winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award and has twice been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award. His critically acclaimed performances include Elvis in the Morning by William F. Buckley Jr. and Searching for Bobby Fischer by Fred Waitzkin, among others.