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Download The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, M.D. Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, M.D. Audiobook, by Nicholas Meyer Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.21 out of 53.21 out of 53.21 out of 53.21 out of 53.21 out of 5 3.21 (29 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Nicholas Meyer Narrator: David Case, Frederick Davidson Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN: 9780307702487
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This is the second of the rediscovered Sherlock Holmes adventures.

London, March 1895. The West End is full of strange happenings. Theater critic Jonathan McCarthy has been murdered. A young actress has also been killed—her throat slit. The Marquess of Queensberry is being sued for libel. And a police surgeon has disappeared along with two corpses.

Prominent figures in the theater district seem to be somehow involved in these various mysteries, including a penniless stage critic and writer named Bernard Shaw; Ellen Terry, the gifted and beautiful actress; a suspicious box office clerk named Bram Stoker; an aging matinee idol, Henry Irving; an unscrupulous publisher calling himself Frank Harris; and a controversial wit by the name of Oscar Wilde.

Scotland Yard is mystified by what appear to be unrelated cases. Sherlock Holmes, however, finds it all elementary: a maniac is at work. And his name is Jack.                                          

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melanie | 2/18/2014

    " love this guy's books. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erik Graff | 2/11/2014

    " Meyer's three Holmes novels were all over the place upon publication and I picked up cloth editions of each for a buck or less at used bookstores. Although I'm no great fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories, only having read them for fun as a kid, the books were entertaining imitations. A real Baker Street Irregular, however, would get more out of them. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Robert | 2/5/2014

    " It didn't live up to my hopes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 2/5/2014

    " In the middle of what had promised to be a very dull day at 221B Baker St., Dr. Watson makes the startling discovery that Sherlock Holmes is friends with George Bernard Shaw. This unexpected dramatic connection brings the celebrated pair into contact with all the leading lights of the London theater scene as they investigate the murder of a detested critic. The frequent references to the canon and solid period detail make this an excellent pastiche, while the lighter characterization of Holmes (pranking Watson, having a second friend) make it a fun read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kristina | 1/25/2014

    " In comparison to Meyer's other S.H. stories, I find Holmes's characterization severely lacking. He has Holmes laughing frequently, where the original Holmes is less demonstrative. He also has Holmes eating healthily through the duration of the case, when it is commonly accepted that Holmes abstains from eating, at least in large, leisurely quantities, when working. Oscar Wilde, Bernard Shaw, and Bram Stoker appear as name-dropped characters whose existence fails to serve any real purpose in connection with the case and in fact, detract from the focus. Holmes comes off as a much more foolish, carefree detective and when compared to The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, this story is both disappointing and highly inaccurate. I find it surprising how Meyer shifts Holmes's character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tammy | 1/25/2014

    " Dude, seriously. Why is this a subgenre? Still, a fun, short read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Edward Erdelac | 1/23/2014

    " I'm consistently impressed by Nicholas Meyer's Holmes pastiches. I was only aware of Seven Percent Solution which I read last year. When I found out about this one I immediately ordered it. Great book. The charactetizations (which to be fair, I usually only read mysteries for the characters - almost never for the detective aspect of the story) are spot on, and the inclusion of several real life personages including Oscar Wilde, and Gilbert & Sullivan were welcome, and a very amusing scene in which Holmes and Watson break into Bram Stoker's apartment and are appalled by his manuscript for Dracula had me smiling. The culprits' motivations were quite original. Didn't see them coming. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cora | 1/19/2014

    " A bit melodramatic for a Sherlock Holmes novel, nevertheless an enjoyable read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe White | 11/7/2013

    " Fairly accurate portrayal of Holmes and Watson characters. Fast pace. Short chapter sections made this more like a short story read than a literature novel. Real mystery to be solved with side character development and misleading turns. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marianne | 10/14/2013

    " Reading this for the third time! It's just a terrific story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Srochat | 8/3/2013

    " Not quite as strong as the 7 Percent Solution, but still enjoyable -- especially with its depiction of George Bernard Shaw and London's theatre life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Charles | 5/18/2013

    " Despite the title it's more mystery than horror, I think. It captures some of the neat stuff about the original Sherlock Holmes stories. It's a fun read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William | 4/14/2013

    " Not as good as Doyle but enjoyable none the less. Another book with a long winded explanation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 7/17/2012

    " A nice homage to Arthur Conan Doyle's creations, although the cameos of Oscar Wilde, Gilbert & Sullivan, etc. were distracting. I liked the that the motive for the murders was outside the box. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee Thames | 6/25/2012

    " 8/25/2012: I remember enjoying this book; particularly the focus on Holmes' addiction. I have the "Sherlockian" on my to read list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brenton | 3/23/2012

    " Nicholas Meyer's pastiche is very much in the spirit of Conan Doyle's Sherlock. A fun read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eaycrigg | 2/26/2012

    " This book is good plane reading. Not especially taxing or brilliant but interesting and humorous. If you've an interest in late victorian literature then this book may be more to you than a simple whodunit. Some of the supporting characters include George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nadia | 8/29/2011

    " Well, I read it a lot of years ago and I do not remember it... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zigforas | 8/22/2011

    " Quite enjoyable for Holmes enthusiasts; and a tidy little sleuthing story for mystery-loving audiences, though perhaps less entertaining for such (Meyer's nods and winks to the canon being lost on the average reader). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pete Aldin | 3/20/2011

    " Meyer rebooted Holmes for me as no one has since. A terrific little Holmesian thriller that steampunk enthusiasts would enjoy too I think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 12/15/2010

    " First of all: this is no The Seven-Per-Cent-Solution.

    However, it's still a good story. Meyer's takes on Holmes and Watson feel familiar, the story is fast-paced and exciting and the iconic figures that pop up actually work in the piece, rather than distracting it.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cora | 9/30/2010

    " A bit melodramatic for a Sherlock Holmes novel, nevertheless an enjoyable read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William | 6/29/2010

    " Not as good as Doyle but enjoyable none the less. Another book with a long winded explanation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 11/5/2009

    " Fairly accurate portrayal of Holmes and Watson characters. Fast pace. Short chapter sections made this more like a short story read than a literature novel. Real mystery to be solved with side character development and misleading turns.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Charles | 6/6/2009

    " Despite the title it's more mystery than horror, I think. It captures some of the neat stuff about the original Sherlock Holmes stories. It's a fun read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nadia | 1/17/2009

    " Well, I read it a lot of years ago and I do not remember it... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Robert | 12/22/2008

    " It didn't live up to my hopes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zigforas | 7/27/2008

    " Quite enjoyable for Holmes enthusiasts; and a tidy little sleuthing story for mystery-loving audiences, though perhaps less entertaining for such (Meyer's nods and winks to the canon being lost on the average reader). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Srochat | 7/10/2008

    " Not quite as strong as the 7 Percent Solution, but still enjoyable -- especially with its depiction of George Bernard Shaw and London's theatre life. "

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About the Author
Author Nicholas MeyerNicholas Meyer is the author of The Canary Trail and The West End Horror, among other books.
About the Narrator

Frederick Davidson (1932–2005), also known as David Case, was one of the most prolific readers in the audiobook industry, recording more than eight hundred audiobooks in his lifetime, including over two hundred for Blackstone Audio. Born in London, he trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and performed for many years in radio plays for the British Broadcasting Company before coming to America in 1976. He received AudioFile’s Golden Voice Award and numerous Earphones Awards and was nominated for a Grammy for his readings.