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Download The Spiritual Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Case for the Existence of the Soul Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Spiritual Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Case for the Existence of the Soul, by Mario Beauregard Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (191 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mario Beauregard, Patrick Lawlor, Denyse O'Leary Narrator: Patrick Lawlor Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2007 ISBN: 9781400175383
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Does religious experience come from God, or is it just the random firing of neurons in the brain? Drawing on brain research on Carmelite nuns that has attracted major media attention and provocative new research in near-death experiences, The Spiritual Brain proves that genuine, life-changing spiritual events can be documented. The authors make a convincing case for what many in science are loathe to consider—that it is God who creates our spiritual experiences, not the brain. Challenging the conclusions of such books as Richard Dawkins’ The God Delusion and Daniel C. Dennett’s Breaking the Spell, this book will be of interest to readers on both sides of a hot-button issue at the meeting place of science and faith.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denise | 2/19/2014

    " Much of The Spiritual Brain is an argument against materialist and evolutionary psychology, and the supposition that there is a gene or "God Spot" in the brain responsible for mystical experiences; not all of that argument is particularly convincing, but the background is important in understanding the whole. I suspect that Professor Beauregard has been beaten up over the course of his career, and the tone of early sections of the book perhaps attests to that. Plow ahead anyway. The chapters on Near Death Experiences and the professor's work with Carmelite nuns are intriguing and left me wanting to know more. As a primer on the fundamental theories at play and a resource for future research, this book is invaluable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 G0ldil0x | 2/18/2014

    " I am reading it now. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeanne | 12/29/2013

    " Tedious and poorly organized. From reviews I expected a lot more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 12/12/2013

    " Excellent look at the neuroscience of the brain and what the definition of mind and consciousness is. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicholas | 11/19/2013

    " From a christian perspective, this book got into some weird stuff that needed filtering, but overall I enjoyed it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 11/7/2013

    " Excellent book showing the latest thinking about the brain/mind connection. I don't think I have seen any other book or article that has so clearly defined the complexity of this issue for the average reader. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bethany | 10/25/2013

    " There is a compelling argument to be found in this book if the reader can wade through the defensiveness of the first few chapters. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Gecko | 9/4/2013

    " My friend gave me this book as a gift. I was expecting more from it, and I couldn't get through it due to the bad science and factual errors. And I still don't understand what a soul is supposed to be. Don't bother, it's not worth it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Liz | 9/4/2013

    " It is hard to read but the info is fascinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 3/19/2013

    " The universe and everything in it is mysterious, including our brains. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meaghan McQuade | 12/22/2012

    " This is a must read for anyone interested in consciousness, religion or spirituality. It makes a strong argument against materialism in a field with room for little else. If you want to get the wheels turning, read this! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Graeme | 10/31/2012

    " One of the best books I've read in trying to understand the mind/brain problem. Good to see some big guns being wheeled out in defence of the non-materialist view. And this book is a very big gun indeed. I highly recommend it for anyone exploring the nature of consciousness. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Denise | 6/16/2012

    " I've really got to stop reading books that have "Case" or "Verdict" in the title. Not worth the time. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Robert Ott | 11/18/2011

    " After the first couple of chapters I got lost in all the psychobabble. Must, much too technical. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Christopher | 3/18/2011

    " When I saw this book I was very excited. I was fascinated to hear what a neuroscience who believed in god would give as a neuroscience explanation for that believe. Instead I got a lot of poor logic and ad hominem attacks on scientists who don't believe in god. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meaghan | 1/24/2011

    " his is a must read for anyone interested in consciousness, religion or spirituality. It makes a strong argument against materialism in a field with room for little else. If you want to get the wheels turning, read this! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 8/2/2010

    " For me, it was a great introduction to the concept of neuroplasticity, but take his theological arguments with a grain of salt! If this book left you thirsty for the former, I highly recommend 'The Brain that Changes Itself' by Norman Doidge. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Christopher | 9/30/2009

    " When I saw this book I was very excited. I was fascinated to hear what a neuroscience who believed in god would give as a neuroscience explanation for that believe. Instead I got a lot of poor logic and ad hominem attacks on scientists who don't believe in god. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeanne | 7/23/2009

    " Tedious and poorly organized. From reviews I expected a lot more. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laurele | 5/20/2009

    " This was a tiresome book, but I soldiered through. It attempts to answer the question, "Did God create the brain or did the brain create God?" I agreed with the conclusion (God created the brain) but did not think it followed from the process taken. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 4/1/2009

    " The universe and everything in it is mysterious, including our brains. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tera | 2/18/2009

    " the authors did a good job of refuting the richard dawkins, "man is a bucket of meat balls" crowd, but the book fell flat on its promise to advance a convincing neurobiological case for the soul. aw crackers… i’m still agnostic "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicholas | 1/4/2009

    " From a christian perspective, this book got into some weird stuff that needed filtering, but overall I enjoyed it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 10/6/2008

    " Excellent book showing the latest thinking about the brain/mind connection. I don't think I have seen any other book or article that has so clearly defined the complexity of this issue for the average reader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Betty | 4/30/2008

    " Interesting writing on mystical experiences.
    Very intense reading. "

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About the Author
Author Mario Beauregard

Mario Beauregard PhD is an associate professor in the departments of radiology and psychology at the Université de Montréal (Canada), where he earned his PhD in neuroscience. He has held postdoctoral positions at the University of Texas Medical School and McGill University. Beauregard’s research concerns the neural substrate underlying self-consciousness, volition, and emotion regulation with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and multichannel EEG. Other major research interests involve the mind-brain question and the neurobiology of spiritual transformation.