Extended Audio Sample

Download The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America Audiobook, by Jonathan Kozol Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,281 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Jonathan Kozol Narrator: Harry Chase Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2005 ISBN: 9780739309865
Regular Price: $14.98 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $14.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

“The nation needs to be confronted with the crime that we’re committing and the promises we are betraying. This is a book about betrayal of the young, who have no power to defend themselves. It is not intended to make readers comfortable.”

Over the past several years, Jonathan Kozol has visited nearly sixty public schools. Virtually everywhere, he finds that conditions have grown worse for inner-city children in the fifteen years since federal courts began dismantling the landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. First, a state of nearly absolute apartheid now prevails in thousands of our schools. The segregation of black children has reverted to a level that the nation has not seen since 1968. Few of the students in these schools know white children any longer. Second, a protomilitary form of discipline has now emerged, modeled on stick-and-carrot methods of behavioral control traditionally used in prisons but targeted exclusively at black and Hispanic children. And third, as high-stakes testing takes on pathological and punitive dimensions, liberal education in our inner-city schools has been increasingly replaced by culturally barren and robotic methods of instruction that would be rejected out of hand by schools that serve the mainstream of society.

Filled with the passionate voices of children and their teachers and some of the most revered and trusted leaders in the black community, The Shame of the Nation is a triumph of firsthand reporting that pays tribute to those undefeated educators who persist against the odds, but directly challenges the chilling practices now being forced upon our urban systems by the Bush administration. In their place, Kozol offers a humane, dramatic challenge to our nation to fulfill at last the promise made some fifty years ago to all our youngest citizens.

Download and start listening now!

BK_RAND_000659

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angie Moon | 2/20/2014

    " I have very mixed feelings about this book. It is extremely well written and I greatly admire Jonathan Kozol's work but the content is so upsetting. The whole time I was reading it I had to spout out the unhappy statistics to anyone who was near me. This country needs to overhaul it's education system. There are children falling through the cracks all the time and it just isn't fair. If this is how we educate our children what will the future be like when they are in charge and are completely unprepared? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Evie | 2/14/2014

    " For teachers, community and national leaders, and all adults who care at all about kids, this book joins the list of must-reads! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan Ethington | 2/13/2014

    " Segregation in public schools is at the same rates since the 50's and 60's. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica Kulp | 1/29/2014

    " reality check. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alisha | 1/22/2014

    " Reading Kozol is always hard for me. On the one hand, he merits praise for highlighting a devastating problem in the United States; on the other, he offers few solutions to the issue of resegregation in America's public schools. Whining is great, but it's meaningless if it is just that. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Malena | 1/14/2014

    " If you have read any Kozol book the are pretty similar. He talks about poverty, institutional racism, and the inequalities between rich and poor schools in our nation. I like that he tells stories for the reader to connect emotionally, but then backs his words up with stats. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelsey Flanagan | 1/12/2014

    " Had to read this for a class in college, but ended up really enjoying the stories told through his interactions with children and the insight it gave me into their lives "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maggie | 12/21/2013

    " I will finish.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Valery | 12/1/2013

    " Great book. Fantastic. But, please Kozol, a little more discussion on CLASS and the connections between racial oppression and the economic structure that perpetuates such "Savage Inequalities." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caitlin Minnich | 11/29/2013

    " I've written all over this book... Sign that it made an impression. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeff | 11/26/2013

    " This book should have been a long NYT magazine piece...not a series of stories/observations strung together into a 300+ page book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rebekah ODell | 11/10/2013

    " Amazing! This is seriously a must-read for everyone. It is staggering to see what is really happening in our urban school systems. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth Brown | 10/17/2013

    " Each and every educator needs to read; it should be a requirement prior to certification. Definitely an eye-opener. Praise to Kozol for his brave stance and tireless work in exposing the injustices and wide disparities (that still exist) with the haves and the have nots in education. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sunhee | 9/4/2013

    " a must-read for anyone interested in the state of inner city public school education, and the achievement gap in this nation in general. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tess Siemer | 8/11/2013

    " This was a difficult read - the truth is depressing! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Georgianna | 5/3/2013

    " Good read...particularly if you are invested in America's (often misguided) system of education (at any level K-12 or higher education). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelsey | 2/19/2013

    " Really excellent discourse on the status of education and how it relates to socio-economic status. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ruby Hollyberry | 12/17/2012

    " Okay, this book is my new philosophic touchstone of education. I can't praise it enough. I want all this man's books and I want them now. I want them in a row sitting alone on a shelf above my computer as inspiration as I spend the next couple of years becoming a teacher. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deanna | 9/6/2012

    " A powerful book that brings the reader face to face with the state of some of our schools in the U.S. Jonathan Kozol is one of my favorite authors to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ami | 8/25/2012

    " a must read for anyone with an interest in social justice or education. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laura | 7/7/2012

    " I started out reading this for class (and checking it out from the library) but ended up going to the bookstore and buying it. Kozol has good insights into the problems in American schools and is an engaging writer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy | 5/23/2012

    " Account of educational inequity that combines stats/figures and stories of real children. At times, the chapters seem to wander and include so much information that it loses its impact. I think Kozol would benefit from the idea that sometimes less is more. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Burke | 8/11/2011

    " I've warmed to Kozol. As long as one doesn't pick up his book looking for more than persuasive anecdotes and extended commentary, one can enjoy that he's a talented wordsmith with decades of credibility, and he's certainly fighting the good fight. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda | 6/26/2011

    " i read this the summer after my 2nd year of teaching and it kind of validated my feelings "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Spencergus | 4/22/2011

    " I had a hard time choosing between 2 and 3 stars. This was a very interesting topic, a topic I care very deeply about. However, I kept getting frustrated with the writing style itself. I thought this book could have been better organized. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 3/27/2011

    " Very, very good, frightening and depressing, will make you angry. Does not give you hope for the future. Cannot believe the stories Kozol tells, but they are facts, and they are disturbing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erin | 3/3/2011

    " Interesting views of problems within inner city schools and how those students are not given equal opportunities in our education system. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 1/15/2011

    " This book should be required reading for all people who have an opinion on schools in America. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 8/1/2010

    " Kozol's most memorable contribution to the public school debate has to do with his framing high-stakes testing as supporting the seperate-but-equal philosophy of Plessy vs. Ferguson rather than the spirit of integration represented by Brown vs. the Board of Education. Absolutely dead on. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew | 7/29/2010

    " If you've read one Kozol book, you've essentially read them all. However, this one has a tone to it that expresses the anger and urgency that is needed to bring education reform to this despicable system. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 7/18/2010

    " Another book that everyone involved in education policy should read (and an engaging and worthwhile read for anyone else too). Kozol is a powerful storyteller, vividly illustrating the education (or lack thereof) being provided to disadvantaged children and tying it to broader policy issues. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 5/19/2010

    " This book is a MUST read for ALL!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jill | 3/17/2010

    " Is it indulgent to read something that you know you'll agree with? I want to write things like this when I grow up. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Jonathan Kozol

Jonathan Kozol is the National Book Award–winning author of Fire in the Ashes, Savage Inequalities, and Death at an Early Age, among others. He has been working with children in inner-city schools for nearly fifty years and is the most widely read and highly honored education writer in America.

About the Narrator

Harry Chase has over thirty years of experience in voice-overs and acting. He is most recognized as the voice of Captain Morgan’s Rum. His work includes feature film trailers as well as spots for Quiznos, Sony Vaio, Disney on Broadway, CNN, CBS, Lifetime, Sci-Fi and National Geographic. Harry’s voice can also be heard in video games such as Grand Theft Auto IV and as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings Online: Shadows of Angmar. Harry won a Best Voice Over Golden Trailer Award for his work on the movie trailer for The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford starring Brad Pitt.