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Download The Secret Speech Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Secret Speech (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Tom Rob Smith
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (3,816 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Tom Rob Smith Narrator: Dennis Boutsikaris Publisher: Hachette Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2009 ISBN:
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It is 1956. Three years ago, Leo Demidov moved on from his career as a member of the state security force. As an MGB officer, Leo had been responsible for untold numbers of arrests and interrogations. But as a reward for his heroic service in stopping a killer who had terrorized citizens throughout the country, Leo was granted the authority to establish and run a homicide department in Moscow.

Now, he strives to see justice done on behalf of murder victims in the Soviet capital, while at the same time working to build a life with his wife Raisa and their adopted daughters, Zoya and Elena.

Leo's past, however, can not be left behind so easily, and the legacy of his former career - the friends and families of those he had arrested as a state security officer - continues to hound him. Now, a new string of murders in the capital threaten to bring Leo's past crashing into the present, shattering the fragile foundations of his new life in Moscow, and putting his daughter Zoya's life at risk.

Faced with a threat to his family, Leo is launched on a desperate, personal mission that will take him to the harsh Siberian Gulags, to the depths of the hidden criminal underworld, and into the heart of Budapest and the Hungarian uprising. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy | 2/16/2014

    " Disappointing. Yes, I gulped it down in less than a day and was riveted by the action, but the story was not nearly as fascinating as Child 44. It was more of an action thriller, and while questions of individual and collective guilt and redemption were raised, the book lacked the emotions and psychology that made the first book great. If you want a great Soviet era thriller, have at it. If you're looking for one of the best read of the year, keep looking. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alke | 2/1/2014

    " Quite scary dark novel - very realistic though in it's description of the dark places in the human soul. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gaile Wakeman | 1/31/2014

    " Didn't love this one--a mish mash of cold war material and extreme characters "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mary Piette | 1/23/2014

    " The second in the Leo Demidov/Soviet Union series disappointed. I liked the first one, "Child 44", but found this one preposterous. I don't think I'll even attempt the third and final one, "Agent 6," based on reviews that make it sound worse than this one.... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Richard Mulligan | 1/17/2014

    " This is the worst book I've ever read. It takes all the worst bits of Child 44 and adds in awful characters, ridiculous storylines, really strange narrative viewpoints - ie sympathy towards really awful, dull people. Can't be bothered writing any more - just avoid! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Martin Kilkenny | 1/13/2014

    " A really good story.....I enjoyed it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mama Kaye | 1/10/2014

    " I really liked Child 44, a thriller set in the waning days of the Stalin regime. Unfortunately, The Secret Speech doesn't quite rise to its level. Sure, at times it's thrilling in a can't-put-the-book-down kind of way, but I felt the various story threads and historical setting were confusing and messy. In Child 44, the central story theme was clear-- how an honorable man learns that he had been duped by his government into committing horrible acts upon its behalf and sets out to change his ways and find redemption. It's fascinating to see his change of heart. In The Secret Speech, you see a continuation of this storyline as a past atrocity comes back to haunt him and his family. The problem is, the people who had been the victims of these atrocities have now become the "bad guys." Who are we supposed to be rooting for, and how much of this history is true? I wish there had been an addendum providing the actual historical context for these events. Is it true that Khruschev's speech was disseminated in this way, and caused former victims to commit violent acts of revenge upon government officials? Is it true that the Soviet government essentially engineered the Hungarian uprising in 1956? In Child 44, I felt the story was firmly rooted in real-world events. Here, I'm not so sure. Another problem was Smith's portrayal of Fraera. She didn't seem real to me. Was she insane? If so, this was not made clear. At times, she seemed to be a person with super powers. Still, I enjoyed reading more about Leo and Raisa, and am looking forward to reading the third book in this series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lonni | 1/6/2014

    " A cold look at life, death, love and war in a cold country "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bill | 1/5/2014

    " Excellent, dense thriller that's a great follow-up to Child 44. A very definite step up from the average and highly recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joy | 1/1/2014

    " I really like this series. I can't imagine what it would be like to live in a communist country, but am thankful I don't have to. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Watoosa | 12/24/2013

    " The sequel to Child 44, by the author who looks like that guy from Coldplay. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barbara | 12/4/2013

    " It was a sequel to 44 Child - good but not great .. . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jens | 11/26/2013

    " Too much melodrama, too little realism, too much action, too little reflection. Even more dangling modifiers than in Child 44. Not sure I can be bothered with Agent 6 for quite a while. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Naomi | 11/22/2013

    " This sequel to Child 44 advances the story line through the Hungarian Suppression by the Soviets. This is a story about the people involved and is only set during these times. If you read Child 44 you will want to read this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brenda S. Adams | 5/8/2013

    " Excellent novel about post-Stalin's Soviet Union in 1956. Not for the faint-hearted, this novel traces a society where the police are the criminals and the criminals are innocent. Action-packed page-turner! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 3/26/2012

    " Not as good as Child 44 but still a decent read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly | 2/18/2012

    " Not as good as Child 44 but still pretty darn good. Didn't realize there was a third installment. Will have to complete the trilogy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tania | 1/31/2012

    " This is a sequel to Child 44, and I was surprised at how different this story was from the first. It gives a good feel for the pressures of living under Communism in the USSR in 1956, but is much more an adventure and quest type story than a mystery / serial killer and cop story like the first book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 MISTRESS OF AWESOME | 7/30/2011

    " I've been re-reading this series, and I do believe I enjoyed this book more the second time around. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anita | 5/16/2011

    " On a par with "Child 44" up until the Hungarian uprising, where I felt the story lost its momentum. Nevertheless, this is a well-written, fast-paced action-packed thriller and I found the "Secret Speech" well worth reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diana | 10/1/2010

    " Secrect Speech is just as gripping as Child 44. Once again, Tom Rob Smith captures your attention and with each word on the page you are transported into the story walking side by side with Leo and Raisa; and what a journey it is. Looking forward to Reading Agent 6. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jazmin | 8/11/2010

    " A scary ending to Child 44... Just as good as Child 44, looking forward to future books by Tom Rob Smith. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lorie Richards | 9/29/2009

    " Interesting story showing how it was to like in the Soviet Union at the end of Stalinism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea Callaway | 9/10/2009

    " Sequel to child 44 doesn't disappoint . Addictive page turner "

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About the Author
Author Tom Rob Smith

Tom Rob Smith graduated from Cambridge University in 2001 and lives in London. His first novel, Child 44, was a New York Times bestseller and an international success. Among its many honors, Child 44 won the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award and was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. He wrote the follow up to Child 44, The Secret Speech, in 2009, and the third installment in the series, Agent 6, was released in 2011. Smith lives in Central London.

About the Narrator

Dennis Boutsikaris has won two Obie Awards, one for his performance in Sight Unseen, and played Mozart in Amadeus on Broadway. Among his films are W.Batteries Not Included, The Dream Team, and Boys on the Side. He is a recipient of both Audie and Earphones Awards and has read over 140 audiobooks.