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Author: Catherine O’Flynn Narrator: John Lee Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2015 ISBN: 9781504626835
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (556 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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Frank Allcroft, a television news anchor in his hometown, is on the verge of a midlife crisis. Beneath his famously corny on-screen persona, Frank is haunted by loss: the mysterious hit-and-run that killed his predecessor and friend, Phil, and the ongoing demolition of his architect father’s monumental postwar buildings. And then there are the things he can’t seem to lose, no matter how hard he tries: his home, for one, on the market for years; and the nagging sense that he will never quite be the son that his mother—newly ensconced in an assisted-living center—wanted. As Frank uncovers the shocking truth behind Phil’s death and comes to terms with his domineering father’s legacy, it is his beloved young daughter, Mo, who points him toward the future. This spirited literary mystery is a funny and moving exploration of what we do and don’t leave behind.

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Quotes & Awards

  • The News Where You Are is a stunning accomplishment, a page-turner shot through with O’Flynn’s compassion and electrifying wit. O’Flynn gives us an unflinching vision of profound loss without ever losing her sense of humor; she shows us that the haunted corridors of the heart can also echo with laughter.”

    Karen Russell, New York Times bestselling author of Swamplandia! and St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves

  • The News Where You Are establishes [O’Flynn] as, let’s say, the JG Ballard of Birmingham…It is a most moving book…O’Flynn comes across as the mistress of compassion…This [is a] blend of Dickens and Alan Bennett, written in the kind of stripped-down, flat style that so suits its time and place. I loved it, and am haunted by it.”

    Guardian (Manchester)

  • “Catherine O’Flynn’s narratives of urban disenchantment answer the challenge for novelists to take the ordinary and make it compelling…Tenderly portrayed, like all O’Flynn characters, [Frank] is far more interested in the invisible lives of people beyond the news…O’Flynn’s eye for the quotidian ridiculous is sharp enough to rank her with Mark Haddon and Marina Lewycka—comic novelists worth taking seriously…This funny, moving novel reflects back to us our everyday selves.”

    Independent (London)

  • “Seriously uplifting. It’s a funny, moving, acutely observed story about family and loss, getting old and being alone. That it also manages to take in British architecture and urban space and the problems of celebrity culture, while being disarmingly easy to read, is testament to Catherine O’Flynn’s comic timing and lightness of touch…Her great strength is to take characters who are, in a way, familiar, who could be annoying, perhaps even pathetic, and to invest them with a palpable humanity and dignity…A pleasurable, satisfying gem of a novel.”

    Scotland on Sunday (Edinburgh)

  • “Author of the critically acclaimed What Was Lost, O’Flynn tends to focus on what people discard, on those people and things that have been passed by and forgotten. Here, Frank identifies with them and lets them know that they are not invisible to him. A sometimes humorous and always compassionate novel about approaching the fear of going out of style and becoming obsolete, with the perspective that history and memories afford.”

    Library Journal book review

  • “In O’Flynn’s novel…the dominant themes of secrets and loss might have made for an immensely sad tale were it not for O’Flynn’s adept use of humor, particularly in her depiction of Frank’s daughter, Mo, and her child’s-eye view of such worldly topics as aging, demolition, and moving on. Versatile British narrator John Lee captures the novel’s varied spirits well. More a character study than a mystery, this title is appropriate for the larger fiction collections of libraries seeking shorter novels for their clientele.”

    Library Journal audio review

  • The News Where You Are is a compelling, moving and wonderful exploration of what it means to age, of how our sense of ourselves changes in ways we would never expect and can’t always control. O’Flynn writes with a humor and subtle grace that underscores the urgency with which her characters approach their own ends.”

    Steven Galloway, author of The Cellist of Sarajevo

  • “O’Flynn’s novel is an evocative study of human nature with all its flaws and virtues…Narrator John Lee’s…charming British accent and full-voiced narration engage the listener and are well suited to the storyline.”

    SoundCommentary.com

  • Selected for the July 2010 Indie Next List
  • A 2011 Edgar Allan Poe Award Nominee for Best Paperback Original

Listener Reviews

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  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barkingmadcat | 2/18/2014

    " Tv news presenter needs a ratings boost. Investigating the death of his predecessor, and paying for bad jokes. Nostalgic over buildings his grandfather designed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lyndsey | 1/15/2014

    " Nowhere near as gripping or as wonderful as What was Lost IMO but O'Flynn writes beautifully yet again about lost, the lost and being found. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurie | 1/2/2014

    " I really loved the characters in this book, and the small, every day emotional moments. I thought the big mystery was pretty easy to figure out and anticlimactic, but it was pleasant to spend time in these characters' lives. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jan | 12/3/2013

    " Frank is a presenter for a W Midlands TV news programme with him we touch on the nature of local TV, ageing, urban redevelopment, loneliness but all rather superficially - a bit like local TV coverage perhaps? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kayla | 11/12/2013

    " Slow character development with an ending that did not merit the buildup. I was left with the feeling that the author herself was mired in the past, a dominant theme in the book. Perhaps that was the meta-context? I wanted to like it more, but then, I always do:) "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Dianna | 10/28/2013

    " A little slow moving. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jenn | 10/24/2013

    " 4 1/2. while i didn't love it as much as "what was lost," catherine o'flynn has got serious chops and i kinda adore her. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruth | 10/7/2013

    " Gentle humour and moving moments of dark sadness. I loved the style of this book - so easy to read, interesting characters, something a little like a mystery story and yet not really...Very enjoyable read. I'm adding her previous book to me 'to read' list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steph | 9/13/2013

    " Worth the wait, but maybe not quite as good as the first book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 8/19/2013

    " Sweet, slight little book about contentment, dressed up as a mystery. Not much of a mystery but a good character study and entertaining. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Peggy | 6/28/2013

    " Kind of a strange book, but worth reading. It's about a television news reader and his mid-life crisis. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 2/5/2013

    " Her books are novels that read like mysteries. Multiple plots, it all comes together in the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rita | 1/12/2013

    " Just not a favorite writing style of mine. Plot moved slowly, too many 'flashbacks' to create the scenes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beth | 11/7/2012

    " "Good read" but not as good as her first book. She does an amazing job of balancing humor with sadness. The concept of aging and legacy were interesting but this story just didn't hook me like the first one did. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paula | 8/23/2012

    " This book was disappointing. It was not a patch on the surreal suburban ghost story 'What Was Lost', her debut novel. Although there was some lovely prose and perceptions about life, I felt it was a bit wishy washy and didn't really go anywhere. I wasn't gripped as I was in WWL. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 10/7/2011

    " I wasnt sure about this at first but by the end I was hooked, and reall empathised with main character , Frank. Funny and sad all at the same time. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michelle | 8/31/2011

    " Finished because it's not worth any more of my time. Skip this one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lesley | 6/30/2011

    " This was a pleasant gentle read with a hint of mystery. Frank allcroft is a genuinely nice guy wh loves his wife and daughter and doesn't like to say no to anyone. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 6/25/2011

    " Her books are novels that read like mysteries. Multiple plots, it all comes together in the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 5/23/2011

    " This is by the author of WHAT WAS LOST, & although this story isn't as good, it has its moments. The protangonist's architect father spent his entire life at his job to the detriment of his relationships with his wife & son. And now all but one of his buildings are being demolished. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Briana | 5/8/2011

    " I couldn't decide whether I loved this book or not. The characters are interesting, the story moved along quickly, there were certainly some beautiful passages, but it felt like something was missing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barkingmadcat | 4/18/2011

    " Tv news presenter needs a ratings boost. Investigating the death of his predecessor, and paying for bad jokes. Nostalgic over buildings his grandfather designed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruth | 4/14/2011

    " Gentle humour and moving moments of dark sadness. I loved the style of this book - so easy to read, interesting characters, something a little like a mystery story and yet not really...Very enjoyable read. I'm adding her previous book to me 'to read' list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Natashya | 4/7/2011

    " A lovely book, beautifully written, about the sadness and absurdity of life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul | 3/25/2011

    " An easy read with well-drawn characters. The plot felt a bit meandering, although it managed to surprise me a little at the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurie | 3/17/2011

    " I really loved the characters in this book, and the small, every day emotional moments. I thought the big mystery was pretty easy to figure out and anticlimactic, but it was pleasant to spend time in these characters' lives.

    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Venuskitten | 3/12/2011

    " Frank, regional news presenter with a line in corny one-liners, struggles to come to terms with the demolition of buildings designed by his late father, the death of his work colleague in a hit and run accident and his mother's ageing. An accomplished, thought-provoking and enjoyable novel.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 3/8/2011

    " A great quick read. It is witty yet insightful. It examines the passage of time & ageing from so many angles through the different characters almost without you realising. I got swept along so quickly by the story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruth | 2/24/2011

    " Very enjoyable, easy to read, well written and engrossing book. I found that although there is not much action it didn't seem to matter. I would read this again and recommend it to anyone to read "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 2/21/2011

    " I wasnt sure about this at first but by the end I was hooked, and reall empathised with main character , Frank. Funny and sad all at the same time. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Rob | 2/17/2011

    " I'm half way through this book, which I'm reading on my iphone. I downloaded it because the range of books on iBooks is very poor.

    I've got to say this is pretty lame and dreary. "

About the Author

Author Catherine O’Flynn

Catherine O’Flynn, the youngest of six children, was born in Birmingham in 1970 to Irish parents. Her father was a newsagent, her mother a teacher.

Prior to the publication of her first novel she did a variety of jobs including web editor, box office assistant, deputy manager of a large record shop, civil servant, post woman, teacher and mystery shopper.

Her debut novel, What Was Lost, won the Costa First Novel Award, was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award, and longlisted for the Booker and Orange Prizes. She was named Waterstone’s Newcomer of the Year at the 2008 Galaxy British Book Awards.

Her second novel The News Where You Are, published in 2010, was shortlisted for the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize, an Edgar Allen Poe Award and was a Channel 4 TV Book Club choice.

Her third novel Mr Lynch’s Holiday was published in 2013.

Her short stories and articles have featured in Granta, The Independent, The Observer and on Radio 3 and 4.

She lives in Birmingham with her husband and two daughters.

About the Narrator

John Lee is the winner of numerous Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award for Best Narration. His has twice won acclaim as AudioFile‘s Best Voice in Fiction & Classics. He also narrates video games, does voice-over work, and writes plays. He is an accomplished stage actor and has written and co-produced the feature films Breathing Hard and Forfeit. He played Alydon in the 1963–64 Doctor Who serial The Daleks.