Extended Audio Sample

Download The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime that Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime that Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars, by Paul Collins Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,094 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Paul Collins Narrator: William Dufris Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2011 ISBN: 9781482974553
Regular Price: $21.95 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

In Long Island, a farmer found a duck pond turned red with blood. On the Lower East Side, two boys playing at a pier discovered a floating human torso wrapped tightly in oilcloth. Blueberry pickers near Harlem stumbled upon neatly severed limbs in an overgrown ditch. Clues to a horrifying crime were turning up all over New York, but the police were baffled: there were no witnesses, no motives, no suspects. The grisly finds that began on the afternoon of June 26, 1897, plunged detectives headlong into the era’s most perplexing murder. Seized upon by battling media moguls Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst, the case became a publicity circus. Re-creations of the murder were staged in Times Square, armed reporters lurked in the streets of Hell’s Kitchen in pursuit of suspects, and an unlikely trio—an anxious cop, a cub reporter, and an eccentric professor—all raced to solve the crime. What emerged was a sensational love triangle and an even more sensational trial: an unprecedented capital case hinging on circumstantial evidence around a victim that the police couldn’t identify with certainty, and that the defense claimed wasn’t even dead.

The Murder of the Century is a rollicking tale—a rich evocation of America during the Gilded Age and a colorful re-creation of the tabloid wars that have dominated media to this day.

Download and start listening now!

BK_BBCA_000735

Quotes & Awards

  • “Riveting…Collins has mined enough newspaper clippings and other archives to artfully recreate the era, the crime, and the newspaper wars it touched off.”

    New York Times

  • “[Collins’] exploration of the newspaper world, at the very moment when tabloid values were being born, is revealing but also enormously entertaining…Collins has a clear eye, a good sense of telling detail, and a fine narrative ability.”

    Wall Street Journal

  • “[A] richly detailed book that reads like a novel and yet maintains a strict fidelity to facts. The Murder of the Century isn’t a case of history with a moral. It’s simply a fantastic factual yarn, and a reminder that abhorrent violence is nothing new under the sun.”

    Oregonian (Portland, OR)

  • “An in-depth account of the exponential growth of lurid news and the public’s (continuing) insatiable appetite for it.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Wonderfully rich in period detail, salacious facts about the case, and infectious wonder at the chutzpah and inventiveness displayed by Pulitzer’s and Hearst’s minions. Both a gripping true-crime narrative and an astonishing portrait of fin de siècle yellow journalism.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • A 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Award Nominee for Best Fact Crime

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gary Gray | 2/18/2014

    " Another murder mystery in the vein of Erik Larson's books. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joel Michaelis | 2/15/2014

    " A quick and interesting read, but not a lot of meat on the bone. Not nearly the depth of something like Devil in the White City. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Valentin | 2/4/2014

    " Well done research but author is limiting himself to yellow-press journalism, he missed the opportunity to go deeper. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Spence | 2/3/2014

    " What a great book! Crazy to see how things were done back then in regards to investigations and such. Great read for those who like non-fiction and a good story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda | 1/31/2014

    " This could have been a very dry and boring recounting of a 100+ year old murder case. Instead, the author found a way to pace it so that the reader's interest was kept and doled out the clues tantalizingly. The amount of research that must have gone into this book was remarkable. The comparison that kept coming to mind was The Devil in the White City. It's a terrific book - highly recommended if you like factual, historical stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel Farabaugh | 1/26/2014

    " This book did a really good job of detailing the information of the crime and interwining it with the personalities of the people involved. This balance made for an effectively compelling narrative. It did not dwell on the gory details nor did it ignore them. I am coming to realize that I like the crime genre a lot and this is a good example of it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danielle | 1/14/2014

    " A little wordy but overall an interesting read. It combines all my must-read criteria/interests: NY history, real-life murder mystery and the history of publishing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 12/14/2013

    " Very interesting and informative about New York in 1897. Learned a lot of historical facts about American during the Gilded Age and tabloid wars. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shannon Burrows | 11/24/2013

    " Ah, back on track....trying to fit in reading and homework and life... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sueroberts123 | 11/23/2013

    " If you like Erik Larson's books (well sourced, history that reads like fiction), you will enjoy this book. Covers a strange murder case in NYC and state of journalism at the time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lacy Phillips | 11/12/2013

    " Interesting for its historical information. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brent Burch | 9/9/2013

    " A great page turner from start to finish. A little too descriptive about the actual crime, but fascinating to see, that even in the late 1800's, the police could still put all this circumstantial evidence together and get the guy responsible. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jack Black | 8/17/2013

    " Fun read. More about the war between the various newspapers at the time than about the murder. But enough information on both to keep you engaged. Paul Collins is a great writer. One of my favorite books by him is "The Three-penny house". "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robert | 6/11/2012

    " Excellent book on an infamous murder and the newspaper wars of Pulitzer and Hearst. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations