Extended Audio Sample

Download The Minister's Black Veil Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Ministers Black Veil (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,713 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne Narrator: Walter Zimmerman Publisher: Jimcin Recordings Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2008 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

The Minister's Black Veil was first published in the 1836 edition of The Token and Atlantic Souvenir. It later appeared in Twice-Told Tales, a collection of short stories by Hawthorne published in 1837. Hawthorne's inspiration for this story may have been a true event. A clergyman named Joseph Moody of York, Maine, nicknamed Handkerchief Moody, accidentally killed a friend when he was a young man and wore a black veil from the man's funeral until his own death. The story concerns the minister of a small town who suddenly and inexplicably begins wearing a black veil that hangs from his forehead and covers his eyes and nose. As one charater in the story says, He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his face. Hawthorne thus creates a dramtic story based around two of his common themes - the effects of secrecy and guilt. Download and start listening now!

BK_JIMC_000325

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Inga | 12/21/2013

    " And hence it shall glimmer in the dark grave! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katya | 12/19/2013

    " Shows peoples true colors. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andalee | 10/23/2013

    " This short story is amazing. I think it's a great commentary on religion and how people can be manipulated by fear of the unknown. It's really a genius piece. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tammy | 10/4/2013

    " This narrative is very like Hawthorne's YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN, except a bit more sinister. Well, maybe not. They are both creepy but poignant. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karissa | 9/13/2013

    " It was dark and haunting but greatly-written and true to human nature. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nicholas Armstrong | 8/10/2013

    " I'm not a fan of Hawthorne, I think he forsook logic and coherence for symbolism - which I hate. I mean, this story makes sense, it's just stupid. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hui Lin | 5/29/2013

    " American Literature Book "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cindy Gu | 5/9/2013

    " This was a very condensed version of the Scarlet Letter to me, because it had the same thematic concepts involved. Although in this, the minister is willing to accept that he committed a sin, and shows it off by wearing a black veil. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Julia | 12/6/2012

    " Another short story I was forced to read in school. I think I will never till the end of my days understand Nathaniel Hawthorne. After all the analysis we did in class I still do not understand the point of this story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 4/20/2012

    " This is one of my favorites from Nathaniel Hawthorne. I think that it is an excellent short story, and I really enjoy teaching it with my 11th and 12th graders. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 3/27/2012

    " U.S. Literature "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandi Aldrich | 1/17/2012

    " It reminded me a lot of The Scarlet Letter, though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Madison | 12/8/2011

    " My favorite of his works. Didn't make me want to vomit! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Candace | 10/25/2011

    " Read it in class and if I didn't have our teacher explain what everything meant and what it was symbolizing I wouldn't of gotten the story at all. But the meaning of the book is really good and interesting and kind of sad that he thought that the sin he held was going to be with him till death. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Paquita Maria Sanchez | 9/3/2011

    " As usual, boring enough to leave me wondering why Hawthorne incessantly uses so many exclamation points. I don't know what he's so excited about. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nick | 3/30/2011

    " it is interesting how people were terrified by the veil. the story depicted how people are fearful to find their true nature, especially through others "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shanna | 1/6/2011

    " One of my favorite of Hawthorne's short stories, The Minister's Black Veil encourages the reader to ponder which is worse, someone else's sin or the feelings we get when someone else's sin sheds light on our own depravity. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Laura | 12/15/2010

    " Hawthorne went to great lengths to make the Puritans seem moronic and life-crushing. A few of the stories were (somewhat) interesting, but I found most of them quite tedious. I was glad when I finished the book! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kienie | 7/21/2010

    " I started out really disliking this book. All the stories were either boring or preachy. But, towards the middle and through the end there were several stories I did like. I think on the whole I don't regret reading it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patiki | 4/29/2010

    " My English teacher friend hates Nathaniel Hawthorne. But these stories are a fun read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne | 11/21/2009

    " Great book today as it was when written. A great bedtime read as each story is about 10 pages long. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz | 9/12/2009

    " I loved these short stories. This was the type of read that has stayed with me for a long time. The whole tone of the book is very New Englandy and as usual with Hawthorne his focus is on the moral struggle of early Americans, with a strange gothic twist - one of my favorite books ever. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cheryl | 6/18/2009

    " Re-read this one since I knew I liked it and it has been more than 2 decades. Some stories were better than others, but I can really appreciate the work for its time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 5/29/2009

    " Twice-Told Tales (Modern Library Classics) by Nathaniel Hawthorne (2001) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Fred | 3/18/2009

    " Very good but a little depressing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave | 3/7/2009

    " The originator of the good campfire stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 April | 2/24/2009

    " "The Artist of the Beautiful" and "Rappacini's Daughter" are definitely five-star stories. The rest: OK, but not masterpieces. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heather | 11/7/2008

    " A nice dose of classic spooky. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 8/7/2008

    " Hawthorne's writing is sometimes stiff, his treatments sober, even dour. But he has an earnestness that pulls the reader in. And I think that it is that quality of earnestness that has qualified him to be generally regarded as an American Master. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christina | 6/7/2008

    " These are really interesting stories. They all seem to be dark and full of unanswerable questions. I haven't read them all, but I intend to through the years. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gretchen | 3/23/2008

    " These stories are a great read--strange, wierd but great-Hawthorne uses language so well -the words can have many meanings "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Nathaniel Hawthorne

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804–1864) was born in Salem, Massachusetts, and made his ambition to be a writer while still a teenager. He graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine, where the poet Longfellow was also a student, and spent several years traveling in New England and writing short stories before his best known novel, The Scarlet Letter, was published in 1850. His writing was not at first financially rewarding, and he worked as measurer and surveyor in the Boston and Salem Custom Houses. In 1853 he was sent to Liverpool as American consul and then lived in Italy before returning to the United States in 1860, where he died in his sleep four years later.