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Download The Nathaniel Hawthorne Audio Collection Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Nathaniel Hawthorne Audio Collection (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
3.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 53.15 out of 5 3.15 (26 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne Narrator: James Naughton Publisher: HarperAudio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2004 ISBN:
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On July 28, 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne's wife left their house in Western Massachusetts to visit relatives. Hawthorne and his 5-year-old son Julian stayed behind. How father and son got on together for the next three weeks is the subject of Twenty Days with Julian & Little Bunny, by Papa, a tender and funny extract from Hawthorne's notebooks, perhaps one of the earliest accounts in literature of a father caring for a young child.

Each day starts early and will be given over to swimming and skipping stones, berry picking and subduing armies of thistles. At one point Mr. Herman Melville comes over to enjoy a late night discussion of eternity over cigars.

With an introduction by Paul Auster, this delightful true-life story by a great American writer emerges from obscurity to shine a delightful light upon family life, then and now. The collection also includes Hawthorne's short stories Young Goodman Brown, The Minister's Black Veil, and Rappaccini's Daughter.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly Cosio | 2/18/2014

    " Reading along with the 11th grade English Lit class "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ali | 2/17/2014

    " This is barely worth reading even to say "I read it." If you can get through The Custom House (the first forty pages) without falling asleep, then Bravo. It doesn't get much more interesting from there. I'm all about classics, but save your energy on this one. So many better classics to spend your time on. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elise | 2/10/2014

    " This book was great to read. I have been plowing through some "easy" reads as of late, and this book was like eating something delicious that's also healthy for you. It was enjoyable, yet full of substance. The reading was thick and heavy and meaningful. Every word served a purpose and every sentence told a story of it's own. This wasn't a book for speed reading, but for slowly devouring and experiencing. Prior to this book, I had just finished "When She Woke" which was a self-admitted modern spin-off of the Scarlet Letter. Though perhaps more relatable due to being more "current", 'When She Woke' did not come close to capturing the same type of feeling and complexity that the Scarlet Letter had. Clearly this book is a classic for a reason and I was happy I read it! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alina Mallworld | 1/28/2014

    " Hate. Only book I ever sparknoted in high school. For real I read all the others, even grapes of wrath... :P "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lola | 1/9/2014

    " Good book cool premise, but weird writing style and a little too contrived. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anthea Carson | 1/2/2014

    " I read this as assigned reading in high school, so my opinion of the book is cluttered with all the stupid analysis of the symbolism, the rose symbolizing the joy and the thorns representing the pain and blah blah. That would have ruined any other book, but this classic survived because... well... the same reason all classics survive. Because it's great, and because it deals with the human condition in an honest way. This book delves into the nature of hypocrisy, sexism and discrimination. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Crystal | 12/17/2013

    " I dont remeber disliking this book so much when I read it in high school. There is a decent story in there somewhere but it's buried in an extremely long an pointless introduction and a lot of drawn out descriptions that I found myself skimming through. For all the words the author uses, I felt like there was much to be desired in the story. He spends way too much time dining on and on about things we could care less about and should have put more effort into the plot and character relationships. I'm glad I read this because it's a classic but I'm glad it's over and I won't be reading it again. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sharon | 12/2/2013

    " What can I say? I don't enjoy classics. And everyone seemed to die or fade away at the end, I didn't feel like there was any sort of happy resolution or acceptance. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 11/7/2013

    " This is a reread from years ago. I always feel bad for people in societies that don't have the whole truth and are forced to suffer because of a lack of understanding. The contrast between Hester and Dimsdale is well done. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Holly Trujillo | 8/12/2013

    " I really did not like this book. I had to force myself to finish it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nicloe | 10/4/2012

    " I've heard some good things about this book, so I thought it would be good to read. I was sadly mistaken. I tried reading it, I really did, but whenever I tried to I fell asleep. I read bits and pieces of it, and I know what happened but I couldn't stay awake to read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sanja Aisha | 4/25/2012

    " "In short, unpleasant as was my predicament at best, I saw much reason to congratulate myself that I was on the loosing side , rather than the triumphant one. . . "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Michael Lee | 3/8/2012

    " maybe it was because i was forced to read this in HS, or it is not my preferred genre, but it was painful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michele | 11/11/2011

    " Read several times in school. Stuck with me. Great illustration of the evil of bias and hypocrisy. I have experienced being an outsider to some extent my whole life. So, I think that's why this one is important to me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah Jo. | 6/4/2011

    " This has to be one of my favorite classics I have read yet! I loved the setting of historical New England and how Hester's punishment of wearing the scarlet letter effected everyone in the story. Overall, I was very pleased and cannot resist from rewarding this book five stars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaret | 5/19/2011

    " I read the Kindle edition, Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables (bargain edition typeset for the Kindle) Dec 2008. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. I liked the old fashioned English. The story was a real page turner, I couldn't wait to get back to the story every time I had to stop. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 David | 5/17/2011

    " I've tried reading this about eighteen times. Still haven't finished it. My wife says that this is her history teacher's favorite book of all time. Her second favorite book? Probably something equally dull. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emily | 5/11/2011

    " Solid 3 1/2 - 4 stars.
    Loads of description and not as haunting as I would have liked, but still really good.
    Extremely, extremely well written though a bit heavy handed.
    I feel smarter after reading it :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bekah | 4/14/2011

    " I had to read this for school, and surprisingly enough it wasn't terrible! The descriptions were interesting and the style of the narration made it interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 3/31/2011

    " Almost done with this - so good, and either I've forgotten or I've never read it before. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danielle | 3/29/2011

    " Another great story by Hawthorne, full of Gothic elements and all types of social commentary. The only reason this one isn't getting a 5 star rating is that the ending was weak and appeared to negate the overall societal themes of the novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda K | 3/25/2011

    " Full of ominous settings, descriptive characters and mysterious occurances, this story was not at all what I thought it might be. Although I thought it to have witchcraft in the 1800s New England as it's theme, it was so much more than that. And, the ending was quite satisfying. A good read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Reginashouse | 3/22/2011

    " Loved it! The Great American Novel! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa | 3/19/2011

    " I should read this again, its been since high school and next week we are touring the house near Boston. In HS I thought it was boring, but I was pretty young at the time, maybe it aged better or maybe I did. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Diane | 3/18/2011

    " A classic, I am told. I read it in HS and reread because we went to the house on vacation last year.
    Rereading did not make it any more interesting that I remember from years. ago. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bonnie | 3/1/2011

    " Hmm, not my favorite, although I want to head down to Salem and tour the house now! "

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About the Author
Author Nathaniel Hawthorne

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804–1864) was born in Salem, Massachusetts, and made his ambition to be a writer while still a teenager. He graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine, where the poet Longfellow was also a student, and spent several years traveling in New England and writing short stories before his best known novel, The Scarlet Letter, was published in 1850. His writing was not at first financially rewarding, and he worked as measurer and surveyor in the Boston and Salem Custom Houses. In 1853 he was sent to Liverpool as American consul and then lived in Italy before returning to the United States in 1860, where he died in his sleep four years later.

About the Narrator

James Naughton is an actor and director. He first came to prominence in the television series adaptation of the Planet of the Apes movie series of the same name. Since then, he has starred in dozens television shows and appeared in numerous Broadway plays. He is a two-time Tony Award winner, one for his performance as Sam Spade in City of Angels and the other portraying Billy Flynn in the 1997 revival of Chicago.