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Extended Audio Sample The Laws of Our Fathers Audiobook, by Scott Turow Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,349 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Scott Turow Narrator: Dion Graham, Kevin T. Collins, Orlagh Cassidy, James Snyder Publisher: Hachette Book Group Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Kindle County Series Release Date: June 2010 ISBN: 9781607883753
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The Laws of Our Fathers, Scott Turow’s most powerful novel to date, opens with a drive-by shooting in one of Kindle County’s most notorious drug-plagued housing projects. The victim is an aging white woman who has never been seen there before, and within days her son, Nile Eddgar, a probation officer, is charged in connection with the crime. Just like that the reader falls once more under the hypnotic spell that only Scott Turow can cast.

Nile’s trial is presided over, and narrated by, judge Sonia “Sonny” Klonsky, whom Turow’s fans will remember from his second novel,The Burden of Proof. The trial brings together a vivid cast of characters from Sonny’s student years during the turbulent ‘60s, among them Nile’s father, Loyell Eddgar, once a leading campus revolutionary, and Sonny’s old boyfriend Seth Weissman, who is now a renowned journalist. All have been permanently marked by the heady iconoclasm of their youth, and some carry terrible secrets that come to bear on the case at hand in unforeseeable and explosive ways.

With its riveting suspense and indelibly drawn characters, The Laws of Our Fathers shows once again why Scott Turow is not only the master of the modern legal thriller but also one of America’s most gifted and satisfying novelists. Turow reveals as no other writer can how the law and its mysterious rituals intersect with real life. In the process he also raises endlessly provocative questions about the meanings of the past and the long shadows it casts on the present.

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Quotes & Awards

  • The Bonfire of the Vanities meets The Big Chill…Wonderfully colorful.”

    New York Times

  • “Absorbing…An ambitious novel and, happily, the author’s firm grasp is more than equal to his reach.”

    Wall Street Journal

  • “Enthralling…Several cuts above the popular competition.”

    Time

  • “Splendid…Every bit as gripping and profound as its predecessors…Turow is in a category of his own.’

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “From the evocative opening paragraph, Turow reaffirms all that separates him from most of his contemporaries…There are so many reasons to savor this book. The language is breathtaking… It’s the real deal.”

    Miami Herald

  • “His dialogue is superb, and his scenes move with pace and authority. The opening is a tour de force of beautifully orchestrated action writing.”

    Newsday

  • “No other novel this year is likely to be as thoughtful, as timely and richly detailed, and as satisfying to read…A tour de force.”

    Detroit News-Free Press

  • “Powerful…A big, ambitious novel…One of the most thoughtful and satisfying novels this year.”

    Philadelphia Inquirer

  • Laws of Our Fathers is a rich, complex and ultimately profoundly moving tale that, like all Turow’s work, is quarried from the mysteries of human character rather than simply from the sometimes too-easy drama of the courtroom…Most fine novels have a keen sense of the passage of time, and Turow’s grasp of the revolutionary fervor of the ‘60s and how it has later calmed into rueful, if still compassionate, acceptance, is masterly…Turow’s grandly ambitious achievement: to focus the profoundest struggles of two generations through one sordid, emblematic crime.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • “Turow once again proves that there is more substance in a single page of one of his novels than in the entire works of John Grisham or any other author in the legal thriller genre.”

    Library Journal

  • “Beneath the layers of deep legal deviousness, Turow never lets you forget that his characters lived and loved before they ever got dragged into court and that they have lives to go back to after the final gavel comes down.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

  • “Turow, while telling a fascinating crime story, skillfully turns the book into a tale of love and loss, of family and friendship.”

    Booklist

  • A USA Today Bestseller
  • Publishers Weekly Best Books of the Year, 1996
  • A New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 2/20/2014

    " Two words: brain candy. It's an easy read, but gets a little awkward in the transition between past and present. Story jumps the shark at the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Susan | 2/4/2014

    " Because I've read other Scott Turow books and liked them, I forced myself to finish this one. But it was drudgery. So much so that the final Turow book I have to read will be put on a shelf for some time to come. I don't think I could stomach two within a few weeks of each other if the other one is like this one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ram | 2/1/2014

    " a fine legal story with detailed and captivating characterizations and ver appealing to all those who were or knew of the flower generation. Scott Turow is readable as always and his novels raise several moral questions in my mind as usual. It also is disturbing to read of the cancer of corruption being so widespread in the American judiciary ... though comforting perhaps to Indians!! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sam | 1/25/2014

    " I started this book and almost gave up on it from the beginning. The first chapter was written in this gangster's tone of voice, and it just pissed me off. But I didn't have anything else to read, so I stuck with it, and a few chapters in it started to get really interesting, and never went back to the gangster's point of view again. Then I got to the last 50 pages or so and completely stopped caring, and consequently stopped reading. Oh well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nadia | 1/24/2014

    " Read in Italian, a long nice book "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debbie | 1/12/2014

    " Good court drama, with fun flashbacks to the early seventies! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeanette | 11/20/2013

    " I think Turow was trying to write too many stories at once, and didn't do a very good job with any of them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dick Peterson | 11/18/2013

    " If Turow could figure out a way to tell his story without the first 200 pages and the last 200 pages, he'd have a five-star novel. Those middle 400 pages were golden. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Bill | 9/4/2013

    " 817 pages of very slow-moving prose. I couldn't finish it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Hope | 8/30/2013

    " This was a legal page turner. Good read for a holiday weekend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alan | 8/17/2013

    " This was not one of the better novels by Scott Turow. Too much trying to sound like an ebonic, black perspective by awhite man. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gargi Talukder | 7/17/2013

    " A decent mystery/thriller, but Turow was a little self-indulgent in his portrayal of the angst of middle-aged characters facing their own mortality and their shared histories. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mark | 12/27/2012

    " Didn't really care for this "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mel Allred | 11/17/2012

    " Scott Turow has a writing style that is ethereal in quality, you feel it, you are there, and you tense up with the movement throughout. I am writing this review over ten years since I read the book, and still feel the aanger, the hopelessness, the fight that writhes within each of the subjects. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kimberly | 8/25/2012

    " Got about halfway through it and couldn't finish. I liked it, but not as much as other stuff I was reading and did not want to read 300 more pages of an "ok" book! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mitch Holsten | 7/26/2012

    " too long in many sections. Liked story line n characterss "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Carol Mckinley | 7/21/2012

    " Turow gets down and dirty in his books and sometimes he bores me with the detail. But otherwise a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Okralaw | 3/3/2012

    " Scott Turow is a master. Loved this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dan | 2/7/2012

    " I didn't finish this book. I like Scott Turow, but I could not get through the flashbacks to the 70s in Berkeley. I grew up after all that was over, and cannot stand to read yet another Boomer flashback. Sigh. :) "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jonna | 1/27/2012

    " Ugh. Couldn't get through the first 30 pages. There are ways to express a character's dialect without actually trying to write in that dialect. Horrid. If I'm missing out on a good story, shame on the author. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Connie | 1/23/2012

    " Disappointing read. Usually like Scott Turow, but not this book. Should have given up halfway through, very confusing and off-point, didn't think it would ever end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sara | 11/17/2011

    " Too much backtracking interwoven into the story to have a cohesive story line. I lost interest by about 30% through. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 9/28/2011

    " A little slow, but well written. Interesting character development. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Marcella | 7/26/2011

    " I had trouble getting through this book. I tried a couple of times and then finally gave up. I don't know if it is the language of the book that didn't appeal to me or the story line....oh well... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Connie | 5/4/2011

    " Disappointing read. Usually like Scott Turow, but not this book. Should have given up halfway through, very confusing and off-point, didn't think it would ever end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen | 3/13/2011

    " Very riveting book. A very intricate look into relationships, the sixties, street culture, and justice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christopher | 2/18/2011

    " Very good but not his best work. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Evan | 12/13/2010

    " Meh. Not really recommended, but for its genre, it's decent. The problems with book exchanges where all the books are German! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Okralaw | 10/20/2010

    " Scott Turow is a master. Loved this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clifford | 9/23/2010

    " This was a well written novel that was thorough in all aspects. I never thought I would come to the end. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roger | 9/13/2010

    " Interesting look at the 60's
    Be prepared for along read "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dan | 8/22/2010

    " I didn't finish this book. I like Scott Turow, but I could not get through the flashbacks to the 70s in Berkeley. I grew up after all that was over, and cannot stand to read yet another Boomer flashback. Sigh. :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janiska | 7/25/2010

    " a bit long,but good, didn't like the gangster talk though "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 7/19/2010

    " A little slow, but well written. Interesting character development. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Carol | 4/20/2010

    " Turow gets down and dirty in his books and sometimes he bores me with the detail. But otherwise a good read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob | 3/15/2010

    " A present-tangled-with-past tale. More (flawed) character driven and less legal than typical Turrow. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Hope | 12/28/2009

    " This was a legal page turner. Good read for a holiday weekend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kim | 11/12/2009

    " Got about halfway through it and couldn't finish. I liked it, but not as much as other stuff I was reading and did not want to read 300 more pages of an "ok" book! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jonna | 7/24/2009

    " Ugh. Couldn't get through the first 30 pages. There are ways to express a character's dialect without actually trying to write in that dialect. Horrid. If I'm missing out on a good story, shame on the author. "

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About the Author
Author Scott Turow

Scott Turow is a practicing attorney and the author of many novels, as well as nonfiction works such as One L and Ultimate Punishment. He frequently contributes essays and op-ed pieces to publications such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Vanity Fair, the New Yorker, Playboy and the Atlantic. Turow’s books have won a number of literary awards, including the Heartland Prize, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, and Time magazine’s Best Work of Fiction. His books have been translated into more than twenty-five languages, sold more than twenty-five million copies worldwide, and have been adapted into a full length film and two television miniseries. Turow graduated from Harvard Law School in 1978 with top honors, was an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago, and served as president of the Authors Guild. He lives outside of Chicago.

About the Narrators

Dion Graham, from HBO’s The Wire, also narrates The First 48 on A&E. Winner of more than a dozen Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award for best narration, he has performed on Broadway, off Broadway, internationally, in films, and in several hit television series. His performances have been praised as thoughtful and compelling, vivid and full of life.

Kevin T. Collins is an actor, singer, narrator, and recording artist with a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. He has performed in numerous theater performances, including Angels, City of Angels, Paradise Lost, and on television in Law & Order: Criminal Intent, As the World Turns, and The Guiding Light. Collins is the winner of five AudioFile Earphones Awards.

Orlagh Cassidy is an audiobook narrator who has twice won the prestigious Audie Award for best narration, as well as nineteen AudioFile Earphones Awards. She is a graduate of SUNY at Purchase and a recipient of the Princess Grace Foundation Scholarship. She has been seen on and off Broadway and in films, including Definitely Maybe and Calling It Quits. Her television credits include roles in Law & Order and Sex and the City and as Doris Wolfe on Guiding Light. She has done voice work for commercials in which she is probably best known for her role as the mom in the “BFF Jill” spots for AT&T.