Extended Audio Sample

Download The Intuitionist: A Novel Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Intuitionist: A Novel Audiobook, by Colson Whitehead Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (3,025 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Colson Whitehead Narrator: Peter Jay Fernandez Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2017 ISBN: 9781436135863
Regular Price: $24.99 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

In a marvelous debut novel that has been compared to Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man and Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, Colson Whitehead has created a strangely skewed world of elevators and the people who control their ups and downs. Lila Mae Watson—the first black female inspector in the world’s tallest city—has the highest performance rating of anyone in the Department of Elevator Inspectors. This upsets her superiors because Lila is an Intuitionist: she inspects elevators simply by the feelings she gets riding in them. When a brand new elevator crashes, Lila becomes caught in the conflict between her Intuitionist methods and the beliefs of the power-holding Empiricists. Her only hope for clearing her name lies in finding the plans of an eccentric elevator genius for the “black box”: a perfect elevator. A brilliant allegory for the interaction of the races, The Intuitionist is also an intriguing mystery, solidly grounded by the exceptional narration of Peter Jay Fernandez.

Download and start listening now!

c9ar

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christine | 2/18/2014

    " This is the first Colson Whitehead that I've read and I'm in love with his writing - the way he packs hidden descriptions into a few words. The books can be confusing to read in small bursts, best to sit and read a chunk at a time because he moves between time periods, I found this one to be a fascinating study of race, politics (office and otherwise), gender, and has a sort of " solve the mystery before you get to the end" element to it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ruth | 2/1/2014

    " Is this one of those books that I'm going to dislike at first but then years later figure out that it was totally amazing but I was missing too many things? That's sort of what it feels like. But today all I can say is that I didn't really enjoy reading this mystery novel about elevator inspectors in the dangerous city. I know it's not supposed to be literal- it's really a big racial allegory, right? But the elevator talk was still too much for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kaz | 1/30/2014

    " Once I learned that this book might be categorized as speculative fiction, it sat well in my mind and got a little easier to read. Yet, I must say that I did not get used to his writing style. As a mystery story, everything started come together after 200 pages. I needed quite patience to stay with this book till reaching 200 page or so. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tracy O | 1/23/2014

    " This book bored the pants off of me. The idea was sort of clever, but I think it could have been a short story in a magazine. Yes, I think I understand what it's about (how we see the world/race relations & I'm not denigrating the importance of those things - my opinion is just about this book. I'm missing the bit of intelligence, I think, that might have allowed me to like this (just the way that I fail to appreciate Time's Arrow or The Mezzanine). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Snarky's | 1/10/2014

    " Most people probably prefer his other books but this is my favorite. I like it more than Apex Hides The Hurt or the other one of which the name escapes me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeff | 1/7/2014

    " This is an amazing book by an amazing author. Truly one of the best works of fiction I have read, and the stunning point about it is that the work is based on being an elevator inspector. Whitehead's ability to take a profession that is not thought of very much and weave such an intricate story through his character is just wonderful. A must read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 hanna | 1/4/2014

    " I would have liked this more, if I had been able to get over the fact that it was about elevators. That probably makes me really immature. Or something. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne Carroll | 12/20/2013

    " Library book group, June 2011 "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 12/19/2013

    " What you rate this depends on your ideas of what constitutes image, metaphor, allegory and synecdoche. The sentences alone have a range worth in-depth consideration. Unlike the American media, or movies, or novels there is a lack of sarcasm and irony. What is in front of you is so clean, so expunged of nonsense, it is hard to determine the meaning or to remember what directness means. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 PopcornMuncher | 12/19/2013

    " This book offered an interesting perspective on some age old philosophical topics. Reason vs. Emotion, Perception vs. Truth both appear as main topics in this surprisingly good read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frances | 12/14/2013

    " Of course I liked that it was a story about elevators (although that wasn't really what it was "about"). Very thought provoking. The author is a good story-teller as well. I look forward to reading other books of his. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vince Tuss | 12/9/2013

    " So taught, so strong, so quick and such a surprisingly strong story about race. And a highly creative universe to fashion the world of the elevator inspector. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily | 7/19/2013

    " Using the idea of elevators as a platform for discussing not only race but society and personal identity is interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melanie | 6/4/2013

    " Although The Colossus of New York is one of my favorite books of all time, this one didn't grab me. There is only so much I want or need to know about the politics of the elevator industry. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 5/31/2013

    " Impressive debut. I do prefer my postmodernism these days to be a bit more Vonnegut and less Pynchon (more of the humor, less of the paranoia). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cody | 2/15/2013

    " A superbly executed allegory--at once haunting and hilarious. Who knew that the world of elevator inspection could be so full of intrigue? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristina | 11/19/2012

    " One of my favorites, and I can't even really tell you why. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jim | 7/12/2012

    " I was excited by the beginning, the main character and the clash of elevator repair ideology, and the Melville homage in the discussion of elevator history; nonetheless it faded quietly after a strong beginning. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave | 6/3/2011

    " truly really excellent and worth seeking out his other books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 5/13/2011

    " If Thomas Pynchon were interested in critical race studies. Wonderful both for its ideas and its narrative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanna | 4/9/2011

    " Loved this! So subtle and multi-layered and intelligent and such great use of language. Also very funny. in a very reticent way. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Colson WhiteheadCOLSON WHITEHEAD is the author of the national best seller Sag Harbor and the novels The Intui tionist, John Henry Days, and Apex Hides the Hurt, as well as The Colossus of New York, a collection of essays. A recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and a MacArthur Fellowship, he lives in New York City.
About the Narrator

Peter Jay Fernandez is an accomplished audiobook narrator who has won three AudioFile Earphones Awards and an Audie Award in 2009. He has also appeared on television, film, and stage. His appearances include roles in Law & Order, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and the musical Thunder Knocking on the Door.