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Extended Audio Sample Apex Hides the Hurt Audiobook, by Colson Whitehead Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,015 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Colson Whitehead Narrator: Peter Jay Fernandez Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2016 ISBN: 9781440796692
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Best-selling author Colson Whitehead has been a finalist for numerous prestigious honors, including the Pulitzer Prize. His works are lauded for their insight into the state of race in America. Here, a small Midwestern town is having an identity crisis-should they have a new techno-savvy name or a name honoring the freedmen who founded the town? Or is the current name just fine? They call in a professional naming consultant, famous for naming Apex bandages-guaranteed to match any skin color. But even he is losing his faith in monikers. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alicia | 1/29/2014

    " Apex Hides the Hurt by Colson Whitehead is a book that had a clever idea but didn't quite pull it off. Featuring a town with an identity crisis a consultant is brought in to rebrand it could have been an interesting commentary on modern society but instead drifted along aimlessly. It failed to keep my attention and took me far longer to read than it should have because I kept putting it down and wandering off. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alyson | 1/27/2014

    " I love all the language play "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jazmin Ortega | 1/27/2014

    " An underwhelming ending, good if sometimes overwrought writing, but entertaining nonetheless. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maura | 1/23/2014

    " This book just didn't keep my interest. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Elaine | 1/13/2014

    " Bits of cleverness, but so facile that it was hard to believe that this was the author of Sag Harbor. Guess it's good that he's getting better not worse. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deirdre | 12/27/2013

    " Apex hides the Hurt is about an unnamed "nomenclature expert" who visits a small town to decide its name. Historically, the town was named "Freedom" by the free blacks who settled there. In order to survive, the citizens of Freedom accommodated a businessman by the name of Winthrop who brought a factory and his name to the town. Now, a software magnate in the new economy wants to bring his business campus and way of life to Winthrop. He is determined to bring about a new name, New Prospera, for the town as well. Whitehead writes engagingly about the intersection of histories and divergent hopes for the future. Past experiences drive future goals and they don't always align, even in a small town. Our nomenclature expert "gets" the different points of view but as a man who comes up with catchy names to push products, does he care? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danceswithwords | 12/20/2013

    " The never-named narrator is a nomenclature consultant, in charge of naming things, and by naming them defining them. He named the bandaid that hid his festering toe wound so that it didn't heal. He's been hired to rename a town, a place settled by free slaves, then renamed, and transformed, by a white commercial class, and recently colonized by a software company that wants to rename it again. Everyone he meets has a connection to one of the names, and one of the potential identities, of the town. The novel is sly and at times quite funny, but it is also a profound and interesting meditation on identity, on what's in a name, on how what we choose to call things can shape a future, or erase a history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shana | 12/19/2013

    " Whitehead's ideas and frame of reference are fascinating. This was less complex and metaphysical than The Intuitionist, but I'll be thinking about product labeling for a long time! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Melissa | 12/18/2013

    " It had a pretty good political message, but I wouldn't say I enjoyed reading it . . . "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denise | 11/7/2013

    " Quirky, yet thoughtful. Makes one think about names and what they really mean. Funny in places and yet deeper than one would think. The title has a double meaning that one recognizes in this story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kari | 10/25/2013

    " A "nomenclature consultant" comes to a small, primarily black, town to help them select a new name for the community. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ethan | 10/17/2013

    " An unnamed nomenclature consultant is hired to rename a midwestern town that wants to bring in big companies. Like his other books, the idea behind it is brilliant, funny and sad all at once, but it is very difficult to connect with any of the characters. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Al | 1/13/2013

    " I went back and forth quite a bit on my feelings toward this book - the first I have ever read by Colson Whitehead - there were parts that were very well-written and I really enjoyed, but overall it fell flat for me, but I'd be willing to try another book by Whitehead "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Morgan Tigerman | 12/12/2012

    " Dude's pen game is ridiculous. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 8/11/2012

    " This is a really neat book and a quick and pleasurable read -kind of pomo cynical anonymous numb narrator (which I'm usually not fond of) but it works here for me, to my amazement. Something resonates about how we use language. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cassi | 3/17/2012

    " A very light book, probably would have been better had I read it, as it didnt translate well to a book on tape. The characters were a bit flat, but the overall writing style was quirky and fun. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Frances | 6/29/2011

    " Some nice imagery. It never seems to get to the point. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marilyn | 6/1/2011

    " Really great, wish they had chosen this for B1410. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brent | 11/11/2010

    " Here's a man (the author, not the protagonist) who loves English words and does magnificent things with them. But his aching urge for cuteness has tarnished my respect for this wordlove. As have certain of the sillier plot elements. Too bad there are no band-aids for wounded prose. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeff | 7/9/2010

    " I hate when I write a name of a book down in summer of 2006, pick it up in 2008, and just hate it. Sigh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrea | 4/1/2010

    " I loved this, loved the writing, the emptiness of modern consumption, the way we all search for something real and find it in names that are false, names that create illusions of what could be. Contrasted with real racism, real people, real struggle... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Donald | 3/7/2010

    " An unnamed "nomenclature" specialist goes to the midwest to rename a town. This got a decent review in the NY Times so I thought that it might be a fun turn on language -- au contraire! No character development. Very disappointing. See review in Publishers Weekly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sunny | 2/21/2010

    " Read it for the second time. Whitehead just gets better with each read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Elaine | 11/8/2009

    " Bits of cleverness, but so facile that it was hard to believe that this was the author of Sag Harbor. Guess it's good that he's getting better not worse. "

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About the Author
Author Colson Whitehead

Colson Whitehead is the New York Times bestselling author of numerous books. He is a Pulitzer Prize finalist and recipient of a Whiting Award and a MacArthur Fellowship.

About the Narrator

Peter Jay Fernandez is an accomplished audiobook narrator who has won three AudioFile Earphones Awards and an Audie Award in 2009. He has also appeared on television, film, and stage. His appearances include roles in Law & Order, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and the musical Thunder Knocking on the Door.