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Extended Audio Sample The Greek Way Audiobook, by Edith Hamilton Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (727 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edith Hamilton Narrator: Wanda McCaddon Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2010 ISBN: 9781470811808
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The aim of this work is not a history of events but an account of the achievement and spirit of Greece.

“What the Greeks discovered, how they brought a new world to birth out of the dark confusions of an old world that had crumbled away, is full of meaning for us today who have seen an old world swept away.”

In The Greek Way, Edith Hamilton shares the fruits of her thorough study of Greek life, literature, philosophy, and art. She interprets their meaning and brings us a realization of the refuge and strength the past can offer us in the troubled present. Hamilton’s book has taken its place among the few interpretative volumes that are permanently rooted and profoundly alive in our literature.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A book of both cultural and critical importance.”

    New York Times

  • “At last, a landmark recording of Hamilton’s magnificent, in-depth overview of Greek life, civilization, literature, art, theater, rhetoric, and history, making this key work of cultural and critical significance available to the audio generation…This program is well read by Nadia May.”

    Library Journal

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven Sills | 2/12/2014

    " I finished it months ago, but skimming over it to write my research project. Hamilton is a classicist rather than a historian, although historians of Ancient Greece tend to be as familiar with Aeschylus as they are Thucydides. Hamilton does know her history, but is rather bold if not reckless in her ideas which would probably get a more circumspect response from a true historian. The Athenians were the only civilization up to that time who loved life, she says. All other civilizations, she says, created institutions around death and the afterlife. She ignores the importance of money that allowed Socrates and others freedom from work to persue art, how in a small town the ideas of intelkects will resonate in all quarters of the city, making intellectual pursuits the talk of all denizens, and how war and its atrocities gave drama art not to mention democracy turning into demogagery "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daphne | 2/11/2014

    " Wonderfully accessible introduction to Greek history. She was made an honorary citizen of Athens and well deserved it. I love her. Her biography, by partner Reid, is worth reading to learn more about this remarkable mind. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tracy | 2/3/2014

    " Confront the sorrows of Electra, Oedipus, Clytemnestra and Antigone, woven threadbare at the seams in a chapter or two, and you're guaranteed to become an emotional wreck upon closing the book (yes, that's the part I liked best). Ah, Greek Tragedy and Edith Hamilton. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 1/31/2014

    " Excellent overview of classical Greek thought, culture and beliefs. I read it as a foundation before starting Homer, Thucydides, Herodotus, etc. The writing is excellent, but very dense and needs to be read carefully. It is not a fast or light read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexh464 | 1/29/2014

    " Good study of ancient Greece. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joe Spencer | 12/15/2013

    " A classic brief history of Greek literature. Definitely worth reading. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deanna | 12/12/2013

    " Good reference for the Greek works I am studying, but it is painfully dry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kayla | 12/2/2013

    " I find it sad that older history books like this can be inaccurate (the Greek Way was highly idealized) but very enjoyable to read, but modern history books can be a pain to swallow, but very accurate. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew Wilson | 12/2/2013

    " I would suggest Hamilton's books to anyone who wants a background in Greek culture & mythology. It really filled in the blanks for me that other writers/poets may have referenced (think the Romantics). Had I read Hamilton prior to English Lit classes, life would have been simpler. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Yash | 11/8/2012

    " The first few chapters were interesting but one she starts elaborating on the Greek Literature, it puts you to sleep...beginning in Chapter 5 it goes completely downhill. I had to read this for a Western Civ book review. My advice: "don't pick this book for any review or report" ! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leann | 10/26/2012

    " Edith Hamilton changed my life in college.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 8/25/2012

    " Amazing. Amazing. Amazing. This book should be read with The Spell of the Sensuous and Lin Yutang's The Importance of Living. My life is better having read them. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jake Lentz | 4/4/2012

    " My current favorite book; brilliantly presented, truthful, braod, and just the right amount of justified snobbery on behalf of the Greeks. Changed my life and how i think about the world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Gager | 10/3/2011

    " Not the edition I had way back in Prep School. Fun and interesting to read as I recall. Date read is a guess. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carl | 9/27/2011

    " Another excellent book by Hamilton. I love her combination of scholarship and story-telling. Not easily done, and she's one of the best. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Will James | 9/24/2011

    " Sometimes difficult to get to grips with, Hamilton's book is nonetheless a wonderfully poetic look at Greek philosophy, history and culture. I loved it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katy | 8/31/2011

    " This was a nicely written description of the Greek psyche. The author obviously admires the Greeks immensely and you feel yourself getting swept up into it. She does note faults, though, so it's not a blind love. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sheik | 7/17/2011

    " After Robert Kennedy was kllled this book was open on his desk. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tracy | 3/18/2011

    " Confront the sorrows of Electra, Oedipus, Clytemnestra and Antigone, woven threadbare at the seams in a chapter or two, and you're guaranteed to become an emotional wreck upon closing the book (yes, that's the part I liked best). Ah, Greek Tragedy and Edith Hamilton. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 1/8/2010

    " Amazing. Amazing. Amazing. This book should be read with The Spell of the Sensuous and Lin Yutang's The Importance of Living. My life is better having read them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leann | 8/26/2009

    " Edith Hamilton changed my life in college.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexh464 | 4/4/2009

    " Good study of ancient Greece. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sheik | 3/30/2009

    " After Robert Kennedy was kllled this book was open on his desk.

    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Claire | 3/24/2009

    " This is my favorite of Hamilton's three Greco-Roman culture books. Not a thorough overview of the entire culture, but provides a good understanding of the roots and worldview of the culture. Very good, understandable while not watered down. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Yash | 11/16/2008

    " The first few chapters were interesting but one she starts elaborating on the Greek Literature, it puts you to sleep...beginning in Chapter 5 it goes completely downhill. I had to read this for a Western Civ book review. My advice: "don't pick this book for any review or report" ! "

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About the Author
Author Edith HamiltonEdith Hamilton (1868-1963) was born of American parents in Dresden, Germany, and grew up in Indiana. Through the first quarter of the twentieth century she was the headmistress of the Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore. Upon retiring, she began to write about the civilizations of the ancient world and soon gained world renown as a classicist. Her celebrated and bestselling books include Mythology, The Greek Way, The Roman Way, and The Echo of Greece. She regarded as the high point of her life a 1957 ceremony in which King Paul of Greece named her an honorary citizen of Athens.
About the Narrator

Wanda McCaddon (a.k.a. Nadia May or Donada Peters) has narrated well over six hundred titles for major audiobook publishers, has earned numerous Earphones Awards, and was named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine.