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Download The Great Crash of 1929 Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Great Crash of 1929 (Unabridged) Audiobook, by John Kenneth Galbraith
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,171 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Kenneth Galbraith Narrator: Nelson Runger Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2009 ISBN:
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With grace and wit, America's foremost economist examines the boom-and-bust that led to the stock market crash of 1929. Economic writings are rarely notable for their entertainment value, but this widely admired best-seller is the exception. Galbraith's light touch makes his expert analysis of America's greatest financial disaster a surprisingly engaging listen for anyone. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Derek Barnes | 2/7/2014

    " Some incredible parallels to the 2008 financial crisis. From bubble analysis to income inequality to corporate corruption and securities deregulation. Only the names have changed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Arline | 2/3/2014

    " Informative but not boring. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew Gardner | 1/24/2014

    " I really wish that recent history was nothing like the history of the crash of 1929. But it is. The best thing about reading this book today is that its history is far enough in the past that we can look at it without all of the emotion that we feel about today's economic situation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James Robinson | 1/22/2014

    " This is a surprisingly breezy read in parts; Galbraith has a dry as a post yet dusts in a little gallows humor for amusement. it is a pretty solid education in the historical antecedents of the current economic struggle and the strain that the "bubble" puts on an economy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott | 1/11/2014

    " Galbraith is sort of the Lytton Strachey of economics. They share a mordant, sardonic wit that makes their writing entertaining even though their tone may at times strike you as unfair and smug. The book is full of surprises: the notion that suicides increased markedly after the crash is a myth; turns out that more people killed themselves during the booming summer preceding the break. Another surprise was that the crash may in fact have been a symptom of the incipient depression, not the cause of it; popular wisdom usually gets this backward. And I was really surprised to learn how long it took the markets to hit bottom: the great crash wasn't a one-day, one-week, or even one-year disaster. It was downward trend that saw the markets fall at first precipitously in the autumn, then rebound a little till summer, then fall some more, and then some more, and then some more ... investors didn't hear "plop!" until 1932, three years after Black Thursday! Let's hope hope the trajectory of the current market crash doesn't follow the same pattern. The Great Crash: 1929 is a very readable history full of fools and villains and more fools, and it gave me all the history I found lacking in Galbraith's much shorter book on market crashes, A Short History of Financial Euphoria. You don't need a deep background in economics or even history to enjoy it, though the last chapters get a little involved in laying out the economic causes for the downturn. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jrohde | 1/6/2014

    " not the most insightful or imaginative nor humorful of Galbraiths wonderful writing but informative. He wrote in the 50s and has revised several times. It appears that many of the factors that led to the 29 crash are absent today, but avarice and greed and mendacity were clearly operative in both cases. a sobering background to todays crisis "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan | 1/6/2014

    " The history of the 1929 stock market crash. The parallels with today's economy are eery. We all know that history repeats itself, but you don't expect it to me SO similar. Easy read, no real tech speak. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hugh Miller | 10/4/2013

    " A recounting of the Great Depression for those of us who didn't live through it. Full of insight and wonderful one-liners. An easy and enjoyable read, but also worthwhile for what it tells us about today! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 8/26/2013

    " Boring read for me. I knew it wouldn't be the most interesting reading when I started it. Other books on the Great Depression are better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thomas | 4/30/2013

    " Read the latest edition of this fine account of the financial market demise of 1929 and beyond. Very good basic work. Leaves one wanting more detail. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mike | 2/18/2013

    " I found this heavy going "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jon | 1/17/2013

    " Well written, interesting, and surprisingly not boring when you consider that it's about economic history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark Schnitzius | 3/12/2012

    " First and only book on economics I've ever read. Quite engaging, actually, full of dry wit and insight, and with many lessons for the current day. Like any book on the subject, I imagine, its assessments should of course be taken with a grain of salt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Garry | 12/21/2011

    " I learnt the causes of boom and bust and the psychology of fear. I also learnt its happened before and it'll definitely happen again and again ( Island? Dubai? ) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alan Webber | 10/16/2011

    " Want to get a read on the Crash of 2008? Read Galbraith on the crash of '29! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jan | 8/17/2011

    " John Kenneth Galbraith writing in 1955 about the madness of 1929. But it's really about the madness of 2008. If you squint just a little bit. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 joby | 9/30/2010

    " A good read with a compelling review of the the market in 1929, but it falls short when discussing policy -- frequently little evidence is given to advance the author's prescriptions and even less presented when dismissing contrary viewpoints. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 7/15/2010

    " Galbraith clearly understood the 1929 Wall Street Crash from an insiders perspective. The book demonstrates the futility of the policy measures to deal with the crash and the bankruptcy of the free market. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steven | 7/2/2010

    " I learned that depressions suck. So does Wiston Churchill. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 5/31/2010

    " This is absorbing reading. It is depressing to realize that the instruments may be different but the effects of an unregulated financial sector are the same then, in 1929, as they are now, 2009. When greedy people are let loose, and have no oversight, then catastrophes occur. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jose | 5/15/2010

    " Reading this I draw two conclusions: never buy stocks on margin, I wonder if we have really learned anything about speculation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wendy | 4/14/2010

    "
    Greed and ignorance lead to disaster.

    Fear and doubt keep you there for a decade. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark | 2/12/2010

    " First and only book on economics I've ever read. Quite engaging, actually, full of dry wit and insight, and with many lessons for the current day. Like any book on the subject, I imagine, its assessments should of course be taken with a grain of salt. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 1/17/2010

    " This is a short, highly readable, often witty take on the 1929 market crash. It's easy to see why it's a classic. Galbraith was a fantastic writer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Orla | 1/13/2010

    " Everyone should read this book. Written in the 1950s, it sheds light on human behaviour in markets and is so relevant to today's economic problems. Low on jargon and high on understanding and clarity. "

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About the Author
Author John Kenneth Galbraith

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a critically acclaimed author and one of America’s foremost economists. His most famous works include The Affluent Society, The Good Society, and The Great Crash. Galbraith was the receipient of the Order of Canada and the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for Lifetime Achievement, and he was twice awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

About the Narrator

Nelson Runger’s voice has been recorded in dozens of audio productions and won him two AudioFile Earphones Awards. His ability to convey difficult, scholarly material with eloquence and ease has earned him critical acclaim, including an AudioFile Best Voice in Biography & History for his reading of Nixon and Kissinger.