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Download The Glory Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Glory Audiobook, by Dr. Shannon C. Cook
3.56 out of 53.56 out of 53.56 out of 53.56 out of 53.56 out of 5 3.56 (18 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Dr. Shannon C. Cook Narrator: Unspecified Publisher: Shannon C. Cook Ministries Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2009 ISBN:
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The Glory is the full essence of who God is. It is the invisible tangible presence of God. In this series learn how Christ in us, is the hope of experiencing the Glory of God......Everything you need in life can be found in the Glory! Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon Lawler | 2/20/2014

    " The meaning of civil rights and segregation in Mississippi enter twelve year old Glory's world during the summer of 1964. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Victoria Whipple | 2/3/2014

    " Glory is about to turn 12 years old in the summer of 1964, but things are changing. First, there's her older sister who suddenly doesn't want to play with her like they used to. There's her friend Frankie, whose older brother also seems to be getting meaner and meaner--especially since that new guy Robbie Fox came to town. Although it's never mentioned by name, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is what is causing the biggest changes around Glory. Just before her birthday, the town pool is closed indefinitely, and many townspeople show a great deal of animosity towards the Northerners who have come to town to set up a medical clinic. Glory's new friend, Laura, is the daughter of one of those "Freedom Workers". Glory seems very enlightened for a girl her age living in the deep south at that time, but then her father is a preacher, and her beloved black maid Emma has raised her since she was a baby. She also is friends with the town librarian, who sees beyond black and white. Things come to a head on the fourth of July, but nobody is seriously injured, and the reader sees the indication of better times to come. Glory's voice is true and clear. One can feel the Mississippi heat and smell the delicious food Emma cooks. The story moves along at a good pace, and secondary characters show some growth, especially Robbie Fox and Emma. Overall a good story about a very important time in America's history. Gr. 3-8 "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren | 1/30/2014

    " It's the summer of 1964 and Glory is turning 12 in the small southern town of Hanging Moss. Despondent that her local pool is closing in the middle of the summer, Glory discovers that there's more to the pool closing than she realized. In fact, there's more to everything than she realized. This is an interesting story of Glory's awakening during a summer when tensions are high as some people in the town oppose the end of segregation. My only criticism is that Glory seems as though she has never realized what racism is before this summer. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Margaret | 1/14/2014

    " I finished this book just a few minutes ago. It was O.K. but not great or outstanding. I felt like it was childish, and that my reading level is higher than this. The context and words didn't challenge me, though it would be better for a younger reader. I have read a lot of books on this topic, so I really didn't learn a lot either. It was interesting to look at the perspective of slavery from the South's side. I would recommend this book to younger readers, around the 4th or 5th grade. 2 stars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Darlene | 1/9/2014

    " Augusta Scattergood takes us on a journey to Mississippi in the early 1960's. Big change is coming and some folks - including Glory's best friend Frankie - are not happy about it. Why are the "yanks" from up north stirring up trouble? Will the local pool reopen and allow blacks to swim there? And, will Glory's beloved library welcome everyone in town, regardless of the color of their skin? This is a MG version of THE HELP and should be required reading for all middle school children. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenn Estepp | 1/1/2014

    " 2 1/2 I think. A little simple and lesson-y for my taste, but it's a solid enough choice for kids who need historical fiction and aren't big readers. For the avid readers, though, I feel like there are more accomplished books that work the same territory. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathi | 12/20/2013

    " This is a sweet, simple children's novel about an almost-12 year old experiencing the civil rights movement as it effects her small southern town in 1962. I was slightly confused about the plot's timeline; it seems that the entire story may have taken place in a week or two This was cute. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica | 12/17/2013

    " Wrapped up a little too neatly for my taste but still a strong book for younger readers on a hard topic like the civil rights movement. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Squeaky | 12/13/2013

    " I really enjoyed this story of an almost twelve girl in 1964 Mississippi and her growing awareness of segregation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marjorie | 12/10/2013

    " a great book for elementary and middle school readers as a basic intro to civil rights experience in the South. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura Gardner | 10/18/2013

    " Glory has an attitude that jumps off the page. She's spunky and spirited and doesn't understand why the adults in her 1960s MS town are so confusing... This historical novel was a quick, enjoyable read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Peggy | 6/28/2013

    " Historical fiction, grades 4 and up. 1964 south racial intergration. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eden | 2/26/2013

    " Wow, this sounds scarily like To Kill A Mockingbird. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 5/9/2012

    " This was a good book I read it a year from now so I can't say much but it was a good book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 2/16/2012

    " Mississippi, freedom riders, civil rights "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tenille Shade | 11/15/2011

    " I found this book to be delightful. Little Glory was a spit-fire, and I was inspired by her tenacity. The book reminded me of a child's version of The Help. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Teresa Bunner | 5/18/2011

    " This book deals with a pivotal time in our nation's history. It is a very surface dealing with the issues of racism and bigotry, but that is probably best for the age group this is written for. Glory has a courage that we should all hope to muster. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin L. | 7/16/2010

    " A very nice YA book on the turbulent times of the 60's and segregation. "

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