Extended Audio Sample

Download The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt Audiobook, by T. J. Stiles Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5 out of 53.5 out of 5 3.50 (28 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: T. J. Stiles Narrator: Mark Deakins Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2009 ISBN: 9780739384978
Regular Price: $32.50 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $24.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

A gripping, groundbreaking biography of the combative man whose genius and force of will created modern capitalism.

Founder of a dynasty, builder of the original Grand Central, creator of an impossibly vast fortune, Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt is an American icon. Humbly born on Staten Island during George Washington’s presidency, he rose from boatman to builder of the nation’s largest fleet of steamships to lord of a railroad empire. Lincoln consulted him on steamship strategy during the Civil War; Jay Gould was first his uneasy ally and then sworn enemy; and Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for president of the United States, was his spiritual counselor. We see Vanderbilt help to launch the transportation revolution, propel the Gold Rush, reshape Manhattan, and invent the modern corporation—in fact, as T. J. Stiles elegantly argues, Vanderbilt did more than perhaps any other individual to create the economic world we live in today.

In The First Tycoon, Stiles offers the first complete, authoritative biography of this titan, and the first comprehensive account of the Commodore’s personal life. It is a sweeping, fast-moving epic, and a complex portrait of the great man. Vanderbilt, Stiles shows, embraced the philosophy of the Jacksonian Democrats and withstood attacks by his conservative enemies for being too competitive. He was a visionary who pioneered business models. He was an unschooled fistfighter who came to command the respect of New York’s social elite. And he was a father who struggled with a gambling-addicted son, a husband who was loving yet abusive, and, finally, an old man who was obsessed with contacting the dead.

The First Tycoon is the exhilarating story of a man and a nation maturing together: the powerful account of a man whose life was as epic and complex as American history itself.

Download and start listening now!

BK_RAND_001827

Quotes & Awards

  • Stiles writes with care and panache about the quintessential ‘robber baron,’ a man widely revered as well as hated.             The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2009
  • A definitive biography . . . Stiles brings the Commodore, warts and all, to life in this new study, which is at once up-to-date in scholarly terms, analytically incisive, and lucidly written. Raleigh News and Observer Best Books of 2009
  • A monumental biography. The Kansas City Star Top 100 Books of 2009
  • At long last a biography worthy of the Commodore, meticulously researched, superbly written, and filled with original insights. Maury Klein, author of The Life and Legend of Jay Gould
     
  • Vanderbilt’s story is indeed epic, and so is The First Tycoon . . . Stiles is a perceptive and witty writer with a remarkable ability to paint a picture of the America in which Vanderbilt lived. Randy Dotinga, The Christian Science Monitor
  • Shrewd . . . As he did in his much-acclaimed Jesse James, Stiles limns the meteoric career of an impetuous spirit.  Rich in detail, the narrative reveals much about not only the unschooled genius . . . but also the national culture he helped transform . . . A landmark study. Starred review, Booklist
     
  • Rousing . . . An exemplary biography. Starred review, Kirkus
  • Thoroughly researched . . . Stiles meticulously separates myths from facts in a book that compares favorably with David Nasaw’s Andrew Carnegie . . . Dispassionately revising our portrait of Vanderbilt, Stiles has produced a work highly recommended. Starred review, Library Journal
  • Sweeping . . . [A] magisterial, exemplary work . . . [that] offers entry into the storm-tossed world of our current tycoons and the rough waters they have piloted us into. William Bergman, American History Magazine
     
  • Superbly researched and elegantly written . . . Stiles’s will likely prove to be the definitive biography of this epic entrepreneur. Martin Morse Wooster, Philanthropy Magazine
     
  • Stiles has painted a full-bodied, nuanced picture of the man . . . Elegance of style and fair-minded intent illuminate Stiles’s latest . . . profound exploration of American culture in the raw. Carlo Wolff, The Boston Globe
     
    “The First Tycoon has been widely praised, and rightly so . . . [An] epic biography.
  • T.J. Stiles writes with the magisterial sweep of a great historian and the keen psychological insight of a great biographer. The First Tycoon is the fullest, most perceptive chronicle ever written of the life and times of Cornelius Vanderbilt, the epitome of unfettered, winner-take-all capitalism. With panache and admirable ease, Stiles maps the financial and political currents on which Vanderbilt buccaneered and shows that it was Vanderbilt, more than anyone else, who enabled business to evolve into Big Business. Patricia O’Toole, author of When Trumpets Call: Theodore Roosevelt After the White House
     
  • T.J. Stiles has given us a balanced and absorbing biography of this colorful and often ruthless entrepreneur, the first of the ‘robber barons’ who transformed the American economy in the nineteenth century. James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era
     
  • The First Tycoon is a brilliant exposition of the life of Cornelius Vanderbilt and the entrepreneurial environment that he shaped. Readers will look at Grand Central Station and much else in American life with fresh eyes. Joyce Appleby, author of The Restless Revolution: A History of Capitalism
     
  • The definitive biography of Commodore Vanderbilt. Both as portrait of an American original and as a book that brings to life an important slice of American history long neglected, this is biography at its very best. A magnificent achievement. Arthur Vanderbilt II, author of Fortune’s Children: The Fall of the House of Vanderbilt
     
  • In this whacking new biography of Vanderbilt, T. J. Stiles . . . demonstrates a brute eloquence of his own.  This is a mighty—and mighty confident—work, one that moves with force and conviction and imperious wit through Vanderbilt’s noisy life and times . . . I read eagerly and avidly.  This is state-of- the-art biography, crisper and more piquant than a 600-page book has any right to be. Dwight Garner, The New York Times
     
  • The illuminating, authoritative portrait of Vanderbilt that has been missing for so long. Alice Schroeder, The Washington Post
     
  • Very absorbing . . . [The First Tycoon] is in fact much more than a biography.  The book is filled with important, exhaustively researched and indeed fascinating details that would profit every student of American business and social history to read. Richard M. Abrams, San Francisco Chronicle
     
  • Perceptive and fluently written . . . Stiles writes with both the panache of a fine journalist and the analytical care of a seasoned scholar.  And he offers a fruitful way to think about the larger history of American elites as well as the life of one of their most famous members. Michael Kazin, The New York Times Book Review
     
  • Monumental and outrageously entertaining . . . Stiles writes in a style the Commdore would have appreciated: swift, economical and direct, daring but never hyperbolic.  The nearly 600 pages of text seem to fly through your hands . . . Stiles has a genuine gift for putting complex historical subjects into perspective without lapsing into revisionism. Allen Barra, truthdig.com
     
  • Monumental . . . Stiles has a gift for making readers admire unsavory characters. When I put down this arresting saga . . . I raised a toast to everything the old rascal did for the U.S. . . . [The First Tycoon] resembles a five-course meal at a three-star restaurant: rich and pleasurable. James Pressley, Bloomberg.com
     
  • Superbly written and researched . . . Worthy of its subject. The Economist
     
  • “Stiles writes with both the panache of a fine journalist and the analytical care of a seasoned scholar. And he offers a fruitful way to think about the larger history of American elites as well as the life of one of their most famous members.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • A penetrating portrait of a complex, self-made titan. Citation for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography 2010
  • With deep and imaginative research and graceful writing, T. J. Stiles’s The First Tycoon tells the extraordinary story of a brutally competitive man who was hard to love but irresistibly interesting as a truly pivotal historical figure. With few letters and no diaries, and with layers of legend to carve through, Stiles captures Cornelius Vanderbilt as a person and as a force who shaped the transportation revolution, all but invented unbridled American capitalism, and left his mark not only all over New York City but, for better or worse, all over our economic landscape. Citation for the National Book Award in Nonfiction 2009
  • T.J. Stiles presents the magnate as a man in full. Boston Globe Best Books of 2009
  • “Stiles, a superb researcher, has unearthed quantities of new material and crafted them into the illuminating, authoritative portrait of Vanderbilt that has been missing for so long.”

    Washington Post

  • “Very absorbing…Much more than a biography. The book is filled with important, exhaustively researched, and indeed fascinating details that would profit every student of American business and social history to read.”

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “Stiles has painted a full-bodied, nuanced picture of the man…Elegance of style and fair-minded intent illuminate Stiles’s latest, expectedly profound exploration of American culture in the raw.”

    Boston Globe

  • “Superbly written and researched…Worthy of its subject.”

    Economist

  • “Vanderbilt’s story is indeed epic, and so is The First Tycoon…Stiles is a perceptive and witty writer with a remarkable ability to paint a picture of the America in which Vanderbilt lived.”

    Christian Science Monitor

  • “Fascinating…A reminder that Vanderbilt’s life and times still have much to teach us.”

    Newsweek

  • “Gracefully written…[Vanderbilt] was the right man in the right place at the right time, and the meticulous Stiles seems to be the right man to tell us about it.”

    St. Petersburg Times

  • “Engrossing and provocative…Stiles draws on exhaustive archival research to clear away the apocryphal and celebrate Vanderbilt as an American icon.”

    Tulsa World

  • “Stiles brings the Commodore, warts and all, to life in this new study, which is at once up-to-date in scholarly terms, analytically incisive, and lucidly written.”

    Raleigh News and Observer

  • “Sweeping…[A] magisterial, exemplary work…[that] offers entry into the storm-tossed world of our current tycoons and the rough waters they have piloted us into.”

    American History Magazine

  • One of the 2009 New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books for Nonfiction
  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • Winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography
  • A 2009 Boston Globe Book of the Year for Nonfiction
  • Winner of the 2009 National Book Award for Nonfiction
  • A 2009 Kansas City Star Top 100 Book for Nonfiction
  • A 2009 San Francisco Chronicle Best Book for Nonfiction
  • A 2009 Christian Science Monitor Book of the Year for Nonfiction

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryan Ansley | 2/7/2014

    " This book was most remarkable in that it laid out for me more clearly than any previous book how many of the monopolies and Robber Barons were made and how they fell. Vanderbilt had a brilliance and foresight, though not formally educated, that ran circles around just about everyone but J.P Morgan. I high recommend it as both an outstanding business book and a great story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shaun | 2/5/2014

    " Not bad! Had it not been required reading for the Second Tuesday of the Month "Gentlemen's" Book Club, I probably would never have read it. I'm glad I did. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob | 2/3/2014

    " Most of the information here was new to me, having always thought of him as a railroad baron, a phase that occupied the very end (after 65) of his career. Stiles did a great job of explaining his contributions to stock market capitalism, the development of the corporation, and puts it in the context of a "virtualization" of business that took place in the 19th century and created the modern New York. The narrative is chronological, though, and so many strands are examined that I found it hard to follow the different "stories." Vanderbilt never really comes across as a person, either, though I suspect the problem here is the Commodore himself, who may have been "unknowable." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/29/2014

    " Long and detailed, great history of money from the beginnings of the country to the late 1800's. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kara | 1/20/2014

    " I thought this book was going to be great. Turns out Mr. Stiles needs a more aggressive editor. But I do love the Com. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa Michele | 1/10/2014

    " Ok you know me and biographies of businessmen. So I loved it. But it is not that compelling because there is so much minutiae about business ventures Vanderbilt pursued. It is very rich in history, especially 1700s, 1800s to Gilded Age. I want to read more about NYC history now. I also want to read about next generation of Vanderbilts - the ones with all the excesses who wasted all the money that Cornelius made! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shannon McKenzie | 1/6/2014

    " Powerful. Epic. I walk the streets of New York and feel Vanderbilt's presence and influence everywhere. Extremely well written and researched. TJ Stiles deserves every award and accolade he receives for this outstanding book. Will be reading his Jesse James (in print) and Custer (coming soon) books as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeremy | 1/3/2014

    " The amount of research it must have taken to write this book is phenomenal. What's more, it is written and organized in an engrossing manner. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew Robus | 12/30/2013

    " Detailed biography of Corny Vanderbilt-pretty interesting for someone from the NY area and interested in the New York Central RR . . . "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Denise Morse | 12/27/2013

    " A bit too slow for my taste "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim | 12/13/2013

    " very informative and puts the reader there during Vanderbilt's life with interesting background on the times and the people who made them what they were "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Seth Kolloen | 11/22/2013

    " Vanderbilt grew the world's largest transportation empire out of a single, leased, wind-powered ferry boat. Sometimes using his fists. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lori | 11/16/2013

    " Interesting man, although the book got a bit tiresome at times "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katherine Schulz | 9/21/2013

    " simply too long...fascinating story, but too much detail. I learned a lot... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Martin Kilkenny | 8/19/2013

    " That was a tough one.....too many names and business dealings...not enough family. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lindsay | 4/4/2013

    " I found the beginning, especially the part about Gibbons v. Ogden, fascinating. The middle draaaaaaaaagged. The end got interesting again. All in all, it was well written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Harrison | 2/29/2012

    " A truly great book for anyone interested in the early industrial period, the history of New York, or the economic history of the United States. Well written, engaging, and thoroughly enjoyable. There is a reason this book won the Pulitzer Prize! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Glen | 2/2/2012

    " A tough read but a good story. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Carol | 7/30/2011

    " Could not finish this book. I got about 1/2 way through and gave up "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeni | 7/11/2011

    " A view of our nations history I hadn't had before. I appreciated the information, even though the book was tedious at times to read. The author does an exhaustive look at the man and the era. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Noladishu | 5/8/2011

    " Great description of the war with William Walker and the early days of capitalism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 2/12/2011

    " I really liked it. Some of the intricate details of his business deals were a little confusing, but it was a great story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lynn | 1/6/2011

    " I enjoyed this well-researched, well-disciplined biography. You can't learn about Vanderbilt's life, without learning lots of American history and a history of the US markets. Fascinating. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 12/1/2010

    " Long and detailed, great history of money from the beginnings of the country to the late 1800's. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kent | 11/4/2010

    " I thought this was an excellent, well research, and readable account of Vanderbilt and his world. It was as interesting to read about him as it was to read about the creation of corporations, transportation industries, and the history of New York. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 A | 10/23/2010

    " The author needs an honorary PhD for the attention to detail throughout this entire book. The definitive biography of Vanderbilt. It even has specific stock transactions including the amount paid, etc. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Steven | 10/18/2010

    " God bless people who can read long, boring biographies. I admire you, but I'm not one of you. I quit this book pretty early. Maybe it gets better, but all I was sure of was that I was getting older. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beaderknits | 9/24/2010

    " More information than you ever wanted to know about the First Tycoon. Insight into the begining of corporations and capitalism. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author

T. J. Stiles has held the Gilder Lehrman Fellowship in American History at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, taught at Columbia University, and served as adviser for the PBS series The American Experience. His first book, Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War, won the Ambassador Book Award and the Peter Seaborg Award for Civil War Scholarship, and was a New York Times Notable Book. The First Tycoon won the National Book Award in 2009. He has written for the New York Times Book Review, Salon.com, Smithsonian, and the Los Angeles Times. He lives in San Francisco.

About the Narrator

Mark Deakins is an actor whose television appearances include Head Case, Star Trek: Voyager, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. His film credits include Intervention, Star Trek: Insurrection, and The Devil’s Advocate. He recently wrote, directed, and produced the short film The Smith Interviews.