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Download The Eye Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Eye Audiobook, by Vladimir Nabokov Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,200 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Vladimir Nabokov Narrator: Fred Stella Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2011 ISBN: 9781441873019
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Nabokov’s fourth novel, The Eye is as much a farcical detective story as it is a profoundly refractive tale about the vicissitudes of identities and appearances. Smurov, a lovelorn, excruciatingly self-conscious Russian émigré living in pre-war Berlin, commits suicide after being humiliated by a jealous husband, only to suffer even greater indignities in the afterlife as he searches for proof of his existence among fellow émigrés who are too distracted to pay him any heed.

“Nabokov writes prose the only way it should be written, that is, ecstatically.” —John Updike

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Syafiqah | 2/19/2014

    " four words: philosophy of the mind. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt | 2/11/2014

    " short/sweet, can read it in a day. lots packed into 100 pages - paranoia, solipsism, intrigue, meditations on mortality, humor, and finally, optimism "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 2/10/2014

    " Clearly my favorite of Nabokov's early work, this one shows him finding his footing as a sublime story-teller, brilliant with prose and at turns hilariously subtle. I high recommendation for The Eye. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pamela Slea | 1/30/2014

    " This story is told from the first person, and the narrator is killed on page 8. Yeah. It's awesome. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Justin | 1/13/2014

    " A fun, quick story that I imagine Nabokov fans will enjoy. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rob | 12/15/2013

    " Well, sure, I guess. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robin | 11/3/2013

    " In my opinion, this is a well written book about a trapped man who just cannot let himself go. He's torturing himself and getting himself stuck within his own memories. In the end, I don't feel sorry for the main character, he got what he deserved. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elise Gabriel | 8/14/2013

    " Read it in one sitting. Nabokov's descriptions of completely mundane happenings are delightfully on point and elegant. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zach | 5/18/2013

    " I enjoyed this little diversion, was not at all confused by the characters and amused by the narrative style. There was a symmetry too that seemed to encase the book. I read most with an hours time and nothing much else. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tami Lynn Andrew | 11/29/2012

    " I love Nabokov. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 3/17/2012

    " farcical yet deeply insightful story about self and identity, but almost forced and clumsy in its execution compared to his later masterpieces. still, definitely not a waste of time, esp given its brief length. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Malamas | 3/12/2012

    " Dark but so good...has marked me "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer Wyld | 2/12/2012

    " I read it while waiting to get Lolita- pretty much what I expected- dark, Russian literature, but well written "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patty | 10/29/2011

    " This was more like a Henry James than Nabokov, and it was more like a long story than a novel. The ending wasn't a surprise, but that was kind of nice. Some kick-ass Nabokov sentences. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Flannery | 5/1/2011

    " I just can't get into Nabokov. Whole time wished I was re-reading The Fall by Camus instead. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ismael | 4/27/2011

    " Miroir de personnages, dédoublement d'événements. Intrigue forte et prenante. Un malaise subsiste à la lecture dans le caractère ambigu du point de vue narratif et la nature imprécise du protagoniste. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elise | 7/29/2010

    " Read it in one sitting. Nabokov's descriptions of completely mundane happenings are delightfully on point and elegant. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 3/23/2010

    " I love a misanthropic "fetus in reverse!"

    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 11/11/2009

    " Clearly my favorite of Nabokov's early work, this one shows him finding his footing as a sublime story-teller, brilliant with prose and at turns hilariously subtle. I high recommendation for The Eye. "

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About the Author
Author Vladimir Nabokov

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (1889–1977) was one of the most prolific writers and literary critics of the twentieth century. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he grew up in a trilingual household and later studied Slavic and romance languages at Trinity College, Cambridge, taking his honors degree in 1922. For the next eighteen years he lived in Berlin and Paris, writing prolifically in Russian under the pseudonym “Sirin” and supporting himself through translations, lessons in English and tennis, and by composing the first crossword puzzles in Russian. Having already fled Russia and Germany, Nabokov became a refugee once more in 1940 when he was forced to leave France for the United States. There he taught at Wellesley, Harvard, and Cornell. He died in Montreux, Switzerland.

About the Narrator

Fred Stella has worked as an actor and voice talent in radio, television, independent films, and audiobooks. He was awarded the Publishers Weekly Listen Up Award for Best Male Narration in 2002. He is on the adjunct faculty staff of Muskegon Community College.