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Download The Emergency State: America's Pursuit of Absolute Security at All Costs Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Emergency State: Americas Pursuit of Absolute Security at All Costs, by David C. Unger Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (18 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David C. Unger Narrator: Michael Prichard Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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In The Emergency State, leading global affairs commentator David C. Unger reveals the hidden costs of America’s obsessive pursuit of absolute national security. In the decades since World War II, presidents from both parties have assumed broad war-making powers never intended by the Constitution and intervened abroad to preserve our credibility rather than our security, while trillions of tax dollars have been diverted from essential domestic needs to the Pentagon. Yet ironically, this pursuit has not just damaged our democracy and undermined our economic strength—it has also failed to make us safer.

In a penetrating work of historical analysis, Unger explains how this narrow-minded emphasis on security came to distort our political life and shows how we can change course. As Unger reminds us, in the first 150 years of the American republic, the United States valued limited military intervention abroad and the checks and balances put in place by the founding fathers. Yet American history took a sharp turn during World War II, when we began to build a vast and cumbersome complex of national security institutions, reflexes, and beliefs. Originally designed to wage hot war against Germany and cold war against the Soviet Union, our security bureaucracy is no longer effective at confronting the elusive, non–state-supported threats we now face.

The Emergency State traces a series of missed opportunities—from the so-called Year of Intelligence in 1975 to the end of the cold war to 9/11—when we could have paused to rethink our defense strategy and didn’t. We have ultimately failed to dismantle our outdated national security state, Unger argues, because both parties are equally responsible for its expansion. While countless books have exposed the damage wrought by George W. Bush’s war on terror, Unger shows it was only the natural culmination of decades of bipartisan emergency state logic—and argues that Obama, along with many previous Democratic presidents, have failed to shift course in any meaningful way.

In this provocative and incisive book, Unger proposes a radically different paradigm that would better address our security needs while also working to reverse the damage done to our democratic institutions and economic vitality.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Unger’s broad indictment of defense policy bipartisan[ship], if not nonpartisan is sure to spark considerable and worthy debate.”

    Publishers Weekly

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Frances Dinger | 9/22/2013

    " Very thorough, but occasionally redundant. Still, a good exploration of how even peacetime presidents have retained wartime powers and how that has affected constitutional democracy, international affairs, and the American economy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Linda Larson kemp | 11/20/2012

    " A must read for everyone. "

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About the Author

David C. Unger has been on the editorial board of the New York Times for more than thirty years and currently writes about military, foreign policy, and international economic issues from a transatlantic perspective. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a part-time faculty member at the Bologna Center of the Johns Hopkins University Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.