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Download The Eichmann Trial Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Eichmann Trial (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Deborah E Lipstadt
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (196 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Deborah E Lipstadt Narrator: Walter Dixon Publisher: Gildan Media LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2011 ISBN:
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The capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina in May of 1960 and his subsequent trial in Jerusalem by an Israeli court electrified the world. The public debate it sparked on where, how, and by whom Nazi war criminals should be brought to justice, and the international media coverage of the trial itself, was a watershed moment in how the civilized world in general and Holocaust survivors in particular found the means to deal with the legacy of genocide on a scale that had never been seen before.

Award-winning historian Deborah E. Lipstadt gives us an overview of the trial and analyzes the dramatic effect that the survivors' courtroom testimony - which was itself not without controversy - had on a world that had until then regularly commemorated the Holocaust but never fully understood what the millions who died and the hundreds of thousands who managed to survive had actually experienced. As the world continues to confront the ongoing reality of genocide and ponder the fate of those who survive it, this trial of the century, which has become a touchstone for judicial proceedings throughout the world, offers a legal, moral, and political framework for coming to terms with unfathomable evil. Lipstadt infuses a gripping narrative with historical perspective and contemporary urgency.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tim | 2/20/2014

    " If you've read any other book about the Eichmann trial you don't need to bother, Lipstadt doesn't offer any new insight. In fact, about 60% of this book is quoted material from secondary sources. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 2/15/2014

    " Lipstadt gives a clear-eyed and interesting analysis of how the trial of Eichmann in 1960 changed the way the world viewed the Holocaust and what the ramifications are from this point 50 years later. I appreciated reading the overview of her own trial defending her book Denying the HolocaustI from charges of libel brought by David Irving, and feel that her debunking of Hanna Arendt's coverage of Eichmann's trial and subsequent writings to be a valuable addition. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Raimo Wirkkala | 2/7/2014

    " This is a concise, informative and thought-provoking account of the abduction, trial and execution of the Nazi Adolf Eichmann by the Israelis in the early 60s. At the back of the book the author also deals with the coverage of the trial by writer Hannah Arendt. She finishes with a thoughtful chapter on the over-arching impact and meaning of this historic trial. This is one book in a series about various aspects of Jewish history, all written by Jewish writers. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 H Wesselius | 1/30/2014

    " 50 years later, Lipstadt revisits the Eichmann Trial. She covers the crimes, the capture and the trial with all the necessary details but very little extras. However, she seems more concern upon revisiting questions of collaboration, active resistance, and passivity that absorbed the Jewish community at that time. This becomes annoying for the general reader. And this continues when she examines Hannah Arendt's coverage of the trial. Not only does she revisit the collaboration debate but then debates unique the Jewish character of the Holocaust versus a non-specific genocide, Arendt's view. Thus missing Arendt's main contribution to the study of genocide and/or evil ... the banality of evil. For a quick overview of the trial, Lipstadt does a great job but for a critical assessment she remains within the Jewish cultural milieu. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jsavett1 | 1/27/2014

    " Great read and another really nice installment in the Jewish Encounters series. I had read Hannah Arendt's Eichmann In Jerusalem years ago and had no idea until reading this book that it was anything but the authoritative account of Eichmann's trial in 1961. Like most of the books in this series, Lipstadt doesn't go into a tremendous amount of depth or a comprehensive report about the content of the trial; however, the book benefits from this lack as it is a real judicial, philosophical, and historical page turner. Lipstadt does a great job of constantly locating the events of the trial within their historical and social context as well as providing an excellent overview of the various reactions to the content of the trial and it's participants. Particularly interesting was her discussion of the trial's reception in Israel both at the time and in it's aftermath. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mad_Maudie | 1/19/2014

    " I agree with what a previous reviewer, Jill, said in her review. Too much of Lipstadt's personal beliefs in here. I could've done without reading this. Her writing style is easy to read, though, so that's a plus. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly Procida | 1/14/2014

    " I have simultaneously read this new release and the 50 year old book based on the trial by Hannah Arendt.Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil Lipstadt does a nice job of incorporating fair criticism and analysis of the earlier work. I am additionally reading In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin. I have also read many, many other books involving the topic of the Holocaust. It is always heart wrenching and mind-boggling. This book emphasizes the wealth of information gathered by the trial. It makes me wonder if a trial of Osama Bin Laden would have had value to understand the terrorism mindset more? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim Johnson | 1/13/2014

    " It was clever of the author to link her own trial to Eichmann's. I really appreciated the open, unbiased way that this subject was discussed. It was informative and riveting at the same time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy | 1/12/2014

    " One of the best books I've read about the Eichmann trial. Excellent background. Excellent takes on Hannah Arendt. Very well done! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elise | 1/8/2014

    " Good, and depressing. Very informative, well-thought out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vince | 11/13/2013

    " A very good mind opening book for me. An interesting exposure of the Holocaust and the individual responsibilites. The exposure of the Holocaust to younger folks, even me who was only 17 when the trail was held "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Catharine Zivkovic | 11/8/2013

    " Concise, interesting, and well researched. This book is well worth reading. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jimbenage | 10/26/2013

    " Interesting historical perspective, a bit boring in the details. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ruby | 9/6/2013

    " Expected it to be more like a suspenseful Law and Order/Good Wife drama but it was a history book, which I should have supposed since it was written by a historian. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ruth Jalfon | 5/24/2013

    " rigorously fair and thoroughly researched account of the Eichman trial. Extremely good read and I learnt a lot more, especially of the events and various controversies before and after the actual trial. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sadie | 11/4/2012

    " Interesting and well written. A piece of Holocaust history I did not know. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer | 6/11/2012

    " As grim as you would expect, but a profound conclusion concerning Rwanda is the reward. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Liu | 4/10/2012

    " Doesn't break any new ground, but a very comprehensive summary of the trail and its contexts, extending into the present. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lindsey | 2/10/2012

    " This is a great read, easily accessible to those without a lot of background on the trial and a new, rich perspective for those familiar with the trial and its historical controversy. Lipstadt also offers a fair and complex critique of Arendt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Oliver Hazan | 9/29/2011

    " Better than 'Hunting Eichmann,' especially in its analysis of Hannah Arendt's coverage of the trial, which is the most original part of this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tim | 5/30/2011

    " If you've read any other book about the Eichmann trial you don't need to bother, Lipstadt doesn't offer any new insight. In fact, about 60% of this book is quoted material from secondary sources. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sadie | 5/24/2011

    " Interesting and well written. A piece of Holocaust history I did not know. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy | 5/16/2011

    " One of the best books I've read about the Eichmann trial. Excellent background. Excellent takes on Hannah Arendt. Very well done! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Todd | 5/11/2011

    " It was an interesting take on the capture and trial of Adolf Eichmann. I did get bit bored with some of the after trial material dealing with the post trial writings and anti-Israel fallout. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Catharine | 4/8/2011

    " Concise, interesting, and well researched. This book is well worth reading. "

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