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Download The Courage to Be Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Courage to Be (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Paul Tillich
4.03 out of 54.03 out of 54.03 out of 54.03 out of 54.03 out of 5 4.03 (30 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Paul Tillich Narrator: Mort Crim Publisher: University Press Audiobooks Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2010 ISBN:
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In this classic and deeply insightful book, one of the world's most eminent philosophers describes the dilemma of modern man and points a way to conquering the problem of anxiety. The book is published by Yale University Press.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David Taylor | 2/16/2014

    " I picked this up after my pastor mentioned Tillich one Sunday. It was the only one of his works they had at BN that week. Tillich is very dense. I found myself reading several pages before what he was discussing feel into place. It all made sense, in time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jon Stout | 2/6/2014

    " A religious discussion of courage from an existialist rather than supernaturalist point of view. Rereading this book after many years, I still have a lot to absorb. Inspirational in an intellectual rather than personal sort of way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Knucklefish | 2/3/2014

    " I read this book for a class called Protestant Thought. Paul Tillich was our example of modern Protestant theology. The book was interesting in the context of the course, but I was also touched by it on a more personal level. As a person who has struggled with religious doubt, Tillich presents a compelling theological framework that includes the possibility of meaninglessness. I would recommend this book to anyone with a serious interest in theology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hans | 2/1/2014

    " Interesting how as I read through more and more of the so called "great authors" I find an underlying pattern and message that is repeated over and over again. These are men and women who have journeyed deep into the darkness of the their own soul and have survived to tell the rest of us about it. To let us know that the alienation we feel is not our alone, but of all mankind when our cultural, religious, philosophical and societal safe-guards have all failed. When we stand naked and vulnerable in the presence of the vast and impersonal universe. Lo, how small is man, how insignificant our lives, and yet when we are able to pierce through this veil of solitude with the courage to just be, then we realize we are not separate but part of this Universe, we are not alienated, but literally children of the stars. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Becky | 1/29/2014

    " This book got me through a rough spot in my life, it helped identify an existential anxiety I hadn't identified in myself at the time. Some existential thoughts and ideas inspire isolating principles but this book was inspiring and self empowering. I particularly enjoyed references to Plato's teachings. It was both academic and spiritual. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Craig Pope | 1/8/2014

    " Great treatment of despair and hope. The cultural critique is still extremely relevant. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mhurst | 1/7/2014

    " Choosing to Be in the face of nothingness - Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Buddhism distilled through a Protestant theologian. Dense, but wonderful! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andrew M | 12/20/2013

    " Tillich's sin is his scholarly comprehensiveness, that's also why he's great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Neil Stafford | 12/5/2013

    " A life changing, philosophy and theology shaping book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Phillip Ross | 10/29/2013

    " Reading Tillich was part of my college reading and was also required in seminary. Oddly, Tillich was not actually a Christian. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Corbin | 10/26/2013

    " Great book. Not his best. The idea, though, is one of the best attempts to merge the idea of faith with modern philosophy. If existentialism appeals to you then this is a must read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 10/9/2013

    " Tillich is a great theologian to read. I wouldn't stay long, though... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bob | 9/23/2013

    " A classic work that speaks to the need for affirmation in the face of forces which would destory humankind. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 8/24/2013

    " Outlines a Nietzsche-inspired sort of post-theology theology; provides a more explicitly anti-fascist solution to the problem of God's death. "The courage to be is rooted in the God who appears when God has disappeared in the anxiety of doubt." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 K.guli | 9/24/2012

    " Quite brilliant, though I am not sure how far his analysis of anxiety in a Occidental context could be extrapolated to include the Self from the Orient. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amber | 4/10/2012

    " If I were to try to describe to someone my faith, I would call myself a "Tillichian" more than a "Christian." Unfortunately, nobody knows who Tillich is outside on PLU, so I need to say "liberal, non-literal, existentialist Protestant" instead. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ainsley | 9/11/2011

    " Having an existential crisis? Paul Tillich goes after the biggest question of all. A dense and scholarly work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 8/26/2011

    " This book has a major influence on my theology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barbara | 3/18/2011

    " The least challenging of the Tillich books I've read and core thought on faith. The work has applications beyond Christianity or theology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Letterswitch | 1/13/2011

    " Started out promising, but ultimately unsatisfying. "The God above the God of Theism" is an unhelpful concept if thinking through the question of God in Existentialism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 12/4/2010

    " Weighty, wise and powerful. A bit much to slog through, especially in the forays into philosophy where my background becomes perilously stretched. But tremendous. The foundational work of the 20th century's greatest theologian. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Victoria | 10/28/2010

    " Tillich officially makes me want to blow my brains out it is so deep sometimes, but I love it and think he's really on to some things regarding religion and being. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary Connors-boe | 9/5/2010

    " This one of the most important books I have ever read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen Dodson | 4/6/2010

    " Hard going but truth is truth "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 K.guli | 1/29/2010

    " Quite brilliant, though I am not sure how far his analysis of anxiety in a Occidental context could be extrapolated to include the Self from the Orient. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barbara | 1/8/2010

    " The least challenging of the Tillich books I've read and core thought on faith. The work has applications beyond Christianity or theology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hywel | 7/31/2009

    " The description of the types of anxiety is outstanding, and this to me is the reason for reading the book. However, after setting out the existential problem to be addressed, Tillich does not offer any compelling resolutions. Otherwise this would be a 5-star book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Glenn | 6/19/2009

    " This classic defines the central human dilemma of being distanced from our essential nature. He defines courage as the choice to live fully in spite of human limitation and
    anxiety.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christopher | 5/14/2009

    " a challenge for this philosopher in the making to get through... but fascinating
    "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Phillip | 5/12/2009

    " Reading Tillich was part of my college reading and was also required in seminary. Oddly, Tillich was not actually a Christian. "

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