Extended Audio Sample

Download The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Case for Books: Past, Present, and Future (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Robert Darnton
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (381 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Robert Darnton Narrator: David Henry Publisher: Public Affairs Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

The invention of writing was one of the most important technological, cultural, and sociological breakthroughs in human history. With the printed book, information and ideas could disseminate more widely and effectively than ever before - and in some cases, affect and redirect the sway of history.

Today, nearly one million books are published each year. But is the era of the book as we know it - a codex of bound pages - coming to an end? And if it is, should we celebrate its demise and the creation of a democratic digital future, or mourn an irreplaceable loss?

The digital age is revolutionizing the information landscape. Already, more books have been scanned and digitized than were housed in the great library in Alexandria, making available millions of texts for a curious reader at the click of a button, and electronic book sales are growing exponentially. Will this revolution in the delivery of information and entertainment make for more transparent and far-reaching dissemination - or create a monopolistic stranglehold?

In The Case for Books, Robert Darnton, an intellectual pioneer in the field of the history of the book and director of Harvard University's Library, offers an in-depth examination of the book from its earliest beginnings to its shifting role today in popular culture, commerce, and the academy. As an author, editorial advisor, and publishing entrepreneur, Darnton is a unique authority on the life and role of the book in society. This book is a wise work of scholarship - one that requires listeners to carefully consider how the digital revolution will broadly affect the marketplace of ideas. Download and start listening now!

BK_PUBA_000026

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jodi | 1/7/2014

    " The collection of essays isn't bad but I feel like the cover and title are a little misleading. It doesn't have all that much to do with "the future of the book". still it's worth reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jonathan | 10/9/2013

    " The title here is a bit misleading, this isn't a straightforward monograph on the debate over the future of the book, but a series of previously published essays by the head librarian of Harvard University. Still, it's clear Darnton believes there is a future for the printed word, and his is a leading voice for public dissemination of knowledge rather than proprietary ownership. His first chapter on Google Books alone is worth the price of the book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Drew | 9/7/2013

    " Underwhelming. Darnton stitches together a hodgepodge of vaguely related essays in what appears to be an opportunistic bid for either attention or a quick buck. Skip it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Khalid | 6/13/2013

    " Robert Darnton doesn't want to have to choose between books and e-books. That's at the core of this compelling collection of essays and articles, some of which have been published elsewhere and some of which are new. He wants knowledge to be available and accessible -- and loves the idea of how new technologies can accomplish that. On the other hand, he has a number of concerns about the unintended or unexpected consequences of a future that rests solely on digital content, such as the fact that Google and others pursuing projects to digitize books aren't doing so as a public service. As Darnton points out, they do not see libraries as "temples of learning", but rather buildings that contain "potential assets or what they call 'content', ready to mined" at a cost that will be a fraction of the expense that went into building those collections. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leif Schenstead-Harris | 6/9/2013

    " After reading most of the essays, I can without significant hesitation state that I enjoy Darnton's prose and ideas, along with his openminded, good-humoured tone. There is some repetition in the subject material, but there's also progression. Darnton is a good resource for the Google Book Search controversy, as well as more generally ideas on e-books and research libraries. An enjoyable read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 E | 6/8/2013

    " I'm a bit disappointed with Darnton's reluctance to write this book right with new content, instead of content culled from previously published essays, yet I still recommend this book to anyone interested in book history or the position of books in the digital age. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Samantha | 4/10/2013

    " Should be required reading for librarians. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Betsy | 3/20/2013

    " Like many here, I was somewhat disappointed in the end. As a librarian, I was hoping for more ammunition to use in the inevitable conversations I find myself having with ignorant people who insist on proclaiming that The Book Is Dead. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sheryl | 10/9/2012

    " Interesting but somewhat repetitive. Still I learned lots. Love the cover! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rae | 9/2/2012

    " A grouping of essays, many of which deal with Google and its efforts to digitize books, written by the author for various publications. Although the content is interesting, there was way too much repetition across the essays. It got annoying. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sinistmer | 2/21/2012

    " This book was not quite what I was expecting, but ultimately I really enjoyed it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 2/5/2012

    " Darnton makes interesting points, but I did not feel that he really ever makes a strong case for books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carla Hanson | 10/22/2011

    " This makes me rethink my love of Google! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Julie Ellis | 10/18/2011

    " This book of essays was advertised as considering why books are important in an electronic, digital world. Some of the essays covered that topic, but many of the others were off the subject. I was disappointed. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cboatfield11 | 7/31/2011

    " I did not give this book because it wasn't quality. I just skimmed it and read what I found interesting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kevin | 6/26/2011

    " The Case For Books. Well this collection of essays by Robert Darnton with that title; certainly isn't one. Boring with a capital B. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 5/4/2011

    " Darnton makes interesting points, but I did not feel that he really ever makes a strong case for books. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 2/5/2011

    " As a reader I was drawn to a book about books. I mean this is a book lovers dream. I found this book to be informative....for a while and then it just became boring. I have to admit that this book let me down it is not often that I give a book a 3 star rating. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dick | 1/26/2011

    " This is a must read for persons interested in the future of books. Covers, among other things, Google's digitization of books project, the preservation of books through microfilming project, etc. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Duane | 1/14/2011

    " Too deep for me to keep my interest. Read a few of the essays and then returned it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 badger | 12/21/2010

    " entertaining and instructive...I love Darnton´s straight-forward style and his ability to explain things+to transmit his contagious enthusiasm for the printed word. Lovely! "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations