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The Birds & Don’t Look Now Audiobook, by Daphne du Maurier Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Daphne du Maurier Narrator: Peter Capaldi Publisher: Copyright Group Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2014 ISBN: 9781780001630
4.00052438384898 out of 54.00052438384898 out of 54.00052438384898 out of 54.00052438384898 out of 54.00052438384898 out of 5 4.00 (1,907 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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In this volume we present two short stories by Daphne Du Maurier. Like Many of Du Maurier’s works, the two included here, “The Birds” and “Don’t Look Now,” have been adapted for other media. Though we perhaps know these two disturbing tales better from Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film The Birds and Nicolas Roeg’s masterful occult thriller Don’t Look Now, listening to their original versions still produces a terrifying, dramatic effect that typifies the work of this first-rate storyteller.

In “The Birds,” Cornwall, England is under attack by flocks of kamikaze seagulls. Soon, all of England is under fire and a national emergency is declared.

In “Don’t Look Now,” a grieving couple travels to Venice in an attempt to overcome the death of their young daughter. There, they encounter psychic sisters and an uncanny red-cloaked figure, foretelling of a future tragedy.

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Listener Reviews

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  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Kesler | 8/18/2020

    " The claustrophobic intensity of Daphne Du Maurier's "The Birds" was well captured in this narration by Peter Capaldi. In this respect, it's superior to the 1963 Hitchcock film, which padded the tale with superfluous love interest and diluted the story in the process. Here we get a sense of stifling, encroaching menace where, as in some of Poe's stories, the walls seem literally to be closing in. Unlike Hitchcock, Du Maurier offers few moments of daylight: the tale begins when the sudden transition from autumn to winter darkens the weather at the same time an avian army invades a rural home. The turn of the seasons, moreover, is paralleled by the turning of the sea-tides, tides which seem to "govern" the bird attacks; and there is, finally, the turning of a man who must change abruptly from a family provider to a family protector. While the ambiguous ending seems to annoy some readers, it is precisely this ambiguity which sharpens the sense of foreboding. Where else, we might ask, could the author have taken it? She would either have the family die a grisly death or, alternatively, serve up a "happy ending." No --- this was the ending the story merited. And in this age of climate change, who knows what forces may yet provoke the animal kingdom and spread a cloak of darkness over humanity? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gina | 2/15/2014

    " Okay I confess, I only read The Birds and not the Other Stories, to be honest, after reading The Birds, I was rather scared and couldn't face the Other Stories. The Birds was intensely gripping so much so that I finished it within an hour - I could not put it down, the style of writing is so descriptive that you feel like you are there within their house experiencing the same terror and wanting to help with boarding up the windows and moving the furniture. However as with some of the other Daphne du Maurier books I have read, the ending was less than satisfactory and left me with a sick feeling in my stomach wondering if the family managed to survive, poor Nat. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lulu | 2/15/2014

    " Good short stories by a great writer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barbara | 2/11/2014

    " Although I had previously read several stories in this book, my Japanese ESL student and I have agreed to read it as our next project. She is extremely enthusiastic about it, in part because she remembers Alfred Hitchcock's film, The Birds. I always look forward to reading DuMaurier! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leanne | 2/10/2014

    " The Birds is my favorite suspense story of all time - Du Maurier is the master. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 2/2/2014

    " "The Birds" is the first thing I have ever read of Daphne Du Maurier's, and it is fantastic. Much better than the Hitchcock movie. Her command of figurative language not only allows the reader to see what is happening, but also, and for this story perhaps more importantly, to hear what is happening. This is a story that, unlike most other things I have read, appeals heavily to the sense of hearing and does a fantastic job of building tension in this way. I am looking forward to reading some of her novels. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amir | 1/30/2014

    " I just loved this book i think its one of her best works. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Usha | 1/26/2014

    " The stories are morbid but still it is worth reading. Spooky kind of stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebecca | 1/17/2014

    " Loved most of the stories in this book. Definitely worth reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 9/8/2013

    " Hardly news, but Daphne du Maurier is brilliant. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jackie | 8/1/2013

    " I really don't know what the hype about The Birds is. I thought The Apple Tree was far better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alycia | 7/6/2013

    " Several of the stories will definitely stick in your mind. However, "The Birds" is by far the best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Victoria | 12/20/2012

    " Wow - I will never look at or listen to the sound of birds in the same way again. Chilling and thought provoking. The following stories were all well written and thought provoking in their own way and Daphne Du Maurier has become one of my favourite authors ever!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandy | 10/1/2012

    " This is my second reading of this book. I really enjoy Daphne Du Maurier's stories. My favorite in this book of short stories is "The Birds". It's ever so much better than Alfred Hitchcock's movie and much more suspenseful! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne | 9/27/2012

    " Much scarier than the movie! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 linnea | 9/19/2012

    " It was a great Halloween read. It makes me want to read Rebecca all over again, i just may. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jill | 5/26/2012

    " Character studies wound around suspense. Chilling, disdainful, cheeky, and full of bright, vivid imagery. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ankur | 4/28/2012

    " Most of the stories are dark. While some of them are engaging and interesting to read; some are quite dull. Overall an average story book from Daphne. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Risa | 3/5/2012

    " i'm a prose, sentences-that-break-your-heart, kind of girl. daphne is a plot girl. we didn't really get along. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy | 9/25/2011

    " Good book and du Maurier is very good with scary fiction but "The Birds" wasn't as good as I expected it to be. It sort of just ends. I guess that works but I guess I was expecting more. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve | 4/9/2011

    " I call her the 'Mistress of Menace', because she is. 'The Apple Tree' wins the creepiness contest by the narrowest of margins over lots of her other short stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mathilde | 3/4/2011

    " J'ai particulièrement apprécié les nouvelles "mobile inconnu", "le petit photographe" et "une seconde d'éternité". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Usha | 2/13/2011

    " The stories are morbid but still it is worth reading. Spooky kind of stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janette | 9/16/2010

    " I actually liked the Hitchcock movie better. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Risa | 3/1/2010

    " i'm a prose, sentences-that-break-your-heart, kind of girl. daphne is a plot girl. we didn't really get along. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jill | 11/15/2009

    " Character studies wound around suspense. Chilling, disdainful, cheeky, and full of bright, vivid imagery. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Denise | 2/19/2009

    " The titular short sroty is where Hitchcock got the idea for his movie. Very good short stories. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Dfordoom | 11/8/2008

    " The Birds is a bitter disappointment for fans of the movie. Amazing that such a great movie could be based on such a mediocre story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne | 10/26/2008

    " Good to read "The Birds" and compare it with Hitchcock's film. "

About the Author

Daphne du Maurier (1907–1989) was born in London, the daughter of the actor Sir Gerald du Maurier and granddaughter of the author and artist George du Maurier. She has been called one of the great shapers of popular culture and the modern imagination. She began writing in 1928, and many of her bestselling novels were set in Cornwall, where she lived for most of her life. Besides novels, du Maurier wrote plays, biographies, and several collections of short fiction. Among her more famous works are The Scapegoat, Jamaica Inn, Rebecca, and the short story “The Birds,” all of which were subsequently made into films, the latter three directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

About the Narrator

Peter Capaldi is a Scottish actor, director, and screenwriter. He has won two BAFTAs, two British Comedy Awards, an Oscar for directing the live-action short film Franz Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life, and is the Twelfth Doctor of the long-running BBC program Dr. Who. Capaldi lives in London with his wife and daughter.