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Download The Birchbark House Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Birchbark House Audiobook, by Louise Erdrich Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.55 out of 53.55 out of 53.55 out of 53.55 out of 53.55 out of 5 3.55 (11 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Louise Erdrich Narrator: Nicolle Littrell Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2010 ISBN: 9781504759243
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Omakayas and her family live on the land her people call the Island of the Golden-Breasted Woodpecker. Although the “chimookoman,” white people, encroach more and more on their land, life continues much as it always has: every summer they build a new birchbark house; every fall they go to ricing camp to harvest and feast; they move to the cedar log house before the first snows arrive; and they celebrate the end of the long, cold winters at maple-sugaring camp. In between, Omakayas fights with her annoying little brother, Pinch; plays with the adorable baby, Neewo; and tries to be grown-up like her big sister, Angeline. But the satisfying rhythms of their life are shattered when a visitor comes to their lodge on winter night, bringing with him an invisible enemy that will change things forever—but that will eventually lead Omakayas to discover her calling.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Erdrich’s occasional small, detailed portraits (many resemble her) are drawn from photographs; they express the warm dailiness of Omakayas’ world…Little House readers will discover a new world, a different version of a story they thought they knew.” 

    Booklist (starred review)

  • “Seven-year-old Omakayas is the heart of the story. Brave, spirited and generally kind, she offers her version of the events—from the mundane to the devastating—on Lake Superior’s Madeline Island. As white people intrude upon Ojibwa territory, disease and death also enter Omakayas’s world and change it forever…young listeners will find it inviting.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Omakayas and her family live on the island of the Golden Breasted Woodpecker in Lake Superior in 1847. Based on her own family history, Louise Erdrich has crafted a richly textured historical novel…In this carefully crafted story, we intimately feel the effect of the Westward Expansion of the United States from the point of view of a loving Ojibwa family. Listeners who prefer action to descriptive narration will find the pace slow. The first of a projected series of books, this audiobook will be a fine addition to school and public libraries.”

    School Library Journal

  • “A novel that is by turns charming, suspenseful, and funny, and always bursting with life.”

    Kirkus

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wendy | 2/12/2011

    " A beautiful coming of age story set in a unique historical fiction setting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Susan | 2/4/2011

    " A fine litlle book about a young girl. Bought for my granddaughter. Audible. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joy | 1/10/2011

    " Can't wait to share this book with my daughter someday. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 1/2/2011

    " I *loved* this book. Read it with Amy for our mother-daughter book group and it sparked some great discussion about Native American culture, lifestyle, spirituality, healing, etc. It's very touching and also inspiring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Becca | 12/9/2010

    " It was pretty good, but the problem didn't happen until the very end of the book, which made it not very exciting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Myra | 12/2/2010

    " I was pleasantly surprised by this book. This is not at all a genre I generally read or even like, but I found myself content with this book and even liking it as it progressed. A good read. :) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rue | 11/12/2010

    " The story was sad but i liked it. It was read to me as a read aloud then i read it on my own and its much better on my own. Also i didnt really learn much about the indians (which was why we were reading it as a class) that i didnt already know. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Portia | 10/15/2010

    " i just happened upon this browsing along the children's shelves in our library. Louise Erdrich? really?

    i didn't get into it quickly, but slowly grew to like and then love because of the extremely intimate details and the wonderful twist of fate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 10/8/2010

    " A great story with heartbreaking moments, but also inspiring and lovely. It gives a very personal look at how this Native American tribe lived their lives at a point when changes were upon them. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 MissGross | 9/26/2010

    " Reading for Multicultural Literature class. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tricia | 9/19/2010

    " Loved this book. So much to be learned about respect for family, nature and community. "

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About the Author

Louise Erdrich is the author of sixteen novels as well as volumes of poetry, children’s books, short stories, and a memoir of early motherhood. She has received the Library of Congress Prize in American Fiction, the prestigious PEN/Saul Bellow Award for Achievement in American Fiction, and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, among many others. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of Birchbark Books, a small independent bookstore.

About the Narrator

Nicolle Littrell is a professional audiobook narrator. Her work includes Louise Erdrich’s The Birchbark House and Joseph Bruchac’s Sacajawea.