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Download Testaments Betrayed: An Essay in Nine Parts Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Testaments Betrayed: An Essay in Nine Parts (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Milan Kundera
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (740 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Milan Kundera Narrator: Graeme Malcolm Publisher: HarperAudio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2012 ISBN:
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Milan Kundera has established himself as one of the great novelists of our time with such books as The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Immortality, and The Book of Laughter and Forgetting. In Testaments Betrayed, he proves himself a brilliant defender of the moral rights of the artist and the respect due to a work of art and its creator's wishes. The betrayal of both - often by their most passionate proponents - is the principal theme of this extraordinary work. Listeners will be particularly intrigued by Kundera's impassioned attack on society's shifting moral judgments and persecutions of art and artists, from Mayakovsky to Rushdie.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 2/8/2014

    " Kundera begins with a riff on Rabelais and leads us on a wild tour of European literature from Cervantes to Gombrowicz, with special attention to authors that I love including Musil and Broch. I found this plus his continual focus on the ideas of literature attractive enough; but he essays music as well. There is a wonderful chapter on Janacek and thought-provoking discussion of Stravinsky's place in European music. And with this embedded references to literature, great literature, and his own work, most of which I've yet to read. And did I mention his exceptional essay on Kafka. This is a relatively short book, but one of great depth and breadth. It is simultaneously brilliant music criticism, elegant literary criticism, commentary on the art of writing and translation, and a guide to the great literature of modern Europe. With this book, a loaf of bread and some wine (along with dozens of other texts) one could while away a year or two. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mythack | 1/27/2014

    " Intellectual steroids. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nutsa | 1/25/2014

    " KUndera writes as literary critique and in many cases offers alternative interpretations of some classic works. But my impression was that his speculations on novel and interpretations of Kafka or other authors contains criticism of contemporary european culture. I think first part of this book was key to this claim that Europe is headed to becoming an uptight culture where lost sense of humor is going to put an end to the history of the novel. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 c.vance | 1/20/2014

    " less thought out and somewhat disappointing after reading The Curtain... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ania | 1/14/2014

    " not his best-some pretty havy chapters on classical music which i shamefully had to skim through.the bits on the art of the novel will interest frustrated writers. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michalle | 1/14/2014

    " Only Kundera could make me cry with an essay about literature, while I was on a plane making its descent into the airport in Berlin. His all-consuming radical understanding of the individual's need for privacy is refreshing given the current personalization of nearly everything. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Apoorva | 1/7/2014

    " Definitely the most interesting work of lit crit I've read in a long time. Doesn't feel like you're reading non-fiction. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Reallynothing | 12/28/2013

    " Avvolgente. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Avital | 12/5/2013

    " Non-fiction full of brilliant ideas sometimes shadowed by Kundera's ego. Music, writing, all the good things. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Harish | 12/3/2013

    " I wonder, why they have not yet given him a Nobel Prize, while twits have walked away with more... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jonasdeleon | 11/5/2013

    " Offensively Eurocentric. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ammon | 9/11/2013

    " A great set of essays that takes up the connection between Kundera's theory of the novel and music, philosophy and the arts in a more direct way than The Art of the Novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 JE | 5/5/2013

    " Covers many wonderful topics in literature, music and history. The underlying theme, of how we remember those who we have cared for after they have died, is persuasive. The final image presented is persuasive. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hüseyin | 12/18/2012

    " This was the best book I've read this year. Anyone with the remotest interest in literature and music should read this book. "

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About the Author

Milan Kundera, the Franco-Czech novelist, was born in Brno and has lived in France, his second homeland, for more than twenty years. He is the author of the novels The Joke, Life Is Elsewhere, The Farewell Party, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and Immortality, as well as the short story collection Laughable Loves—all originally written in Czech. Like Slowness, his two earlier nonfiction works, The Art of the Novel and Testaments Betrayed, were originally written in French.

About the Narrator

Graeme Malcolm has performed on Broadway as Pharaoh in Aida and as Sir Edward Ramsay in The King and I. His television credits include Law & Order, Against the Law, Criminal Intent, and Guiding Light. He has narrated hundreds of audiobooks.