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Extended Audio Sample Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology Audiobook, by Neil Postman Click for printable size audiobook cover
4.08 out of 54.08 out of 54.08 out of 54.08 out of 54.08 out of 5 4.08 (25 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Neil Postman Narrator: Jeff Riggenbach Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2012 ISBN: 9781470834371
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In this witty, often terrifying work of cultural criticism, Postman chronicles our transformation into a Technopoly: a society that no longer merely uses technology as a support system but instead is shaped by it. According to Postman, technology is rapidly gaining sovereignty over social institutions and national life to become self-justifying, self-perpetuating, and omnipresent. He warns that this will have radical consequences for the meanings of politics, art, religion, family, education, privacy, intelligence, and truth, as they are redefined to fit the requirements of the technological thought-world.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Mr. Postman puts [his ideas] across with energy, conviction, and considerable verbal dexterity. His illustrations of how new technologies can alter society are particularly vivid and thought-provoking.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “Neil Postman’s cogent and lucid analysis of our indiscriminate embrace of technological innovation deserves the widest possible audience.”

    AudioFile

  • “Amusing, learned, and prickling with intelligence, Postman easily outclasses the Allan Bloomians in the grave work of showing how it is that we’ve now stumbled our way into 1984—and offers, at end, some modest suggestions as to what to do about it.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily Nickerson | 2/19/2014

    " Very thought-provoking book about the sometimes insidious ways in which technology affects our lives. Neil Postman has an easy to read style of prose, so it's not too painful a read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenny | 2/16/2014

    " Postman did not frequently consider other perspectives, but the questions he raised have helped me look at technology with a more critical and responsible eye. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ktread | 2/11/2014

    " Read about half the book to evaluate for CC. Put on 2011-12 syllabus. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 P.S. | 2/9/2014

    " unpacks the spread of The Matrix from Pre-Frederick Winslow Taylor and beyond. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gary | 1/27/2014

    " Good study of technology, alienation, capitalist society, and American culture. I thought it was nicely analytical. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 1/18/2014

    " A fabulous book I read my freshman year in college and recently re-discovered. The title says it all and it is just as relevant and dead-on now as when it was published 16 years ago! I'm looking forward to reading Postman's other books: "The End of Education" and "Teaching as a Subversive Activity." A must read for anyone in academia or anyone wishing to stop the tidal wave of technology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ron | 1/13/2014

    " Along with Jerry Mander and Barry Sanders Postman gets to the roots of why our society is doomed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maura | 12/24/2013

    " Will make you reassess the role that technology should play in our lives and whether or not we truly have control over it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ike | 11/26/2013

    " I loved this book. It was another great thought provoking work by Postman. Anyone who hasn't read Postman I highly recommend that you do. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 11/24/2013

    " I read this when it came out but I didn't finish it. However, I do remember that his thinking was spot on. Most of his theories have come true. He had a brilliant mind and I admire his work very much. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gaylene | 11/22/2013

    " This book was first published 20 years ago. Even if you don't agree with everything Postman says, you can't deny the fact that it's thought-provoking. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thomas | 11/11/2013

    " great commentary/criticism on rise of technology and dangers to culture that we may be unaware of. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andy Kline | 11/3/2013

    " Any book that challenges western worldview as well as this book is a worthwhile read. I am now a confirmed technopoly freedom fighter. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew Jones | 10/22/2013

    " This was the first Postman book I read and wow did it blow me away! He has such great insights into culture and society. Must read! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brett | 10/8/2013

    " Great insight into our culture. Atrocious solutions in final chapter. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colin | 9/21/2013

    " Read anything by Postman. Twice. More if you're an educator. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tiffany | 9/16/2013

    " um some interesting things are said in this book. super dense with info and pretty boring (sorry suzie).had a really tough time getting through it. the only chapter that interested me was the medical technology chapter (go figure). a lot of the author's points seem like speculation.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 4/21/2013

    " Didn't finish the book, as I didn't have time, but it offers in interesting view of the role of technology in society. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne | 2/4/2013

    " Great essays on the benefits and hinderances of technology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carrie | 1/25/2013

    " I had to read this book for school in college, and I found it to be very thought provoking regarding how technology has changed our culture in ways we don't even realize. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Messina | 12/22/2012

    " It might be dated now, but I remember that this was a really good read -- Postman is someone certainly to study and to give serious consideration to. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruby | 11/2/2012

    " A boring book (like other Neil Postman books) but a good read. It's also recommended by Shaykh Hamza... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Job Dalomba | 10/12/2012

    " Outstanding, especially the final couple of chapters. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thomas Kinsfather | 9/19/2012

    " Insight into the role technology plays in society and the effects of different technologies on the individual. Great book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 9/14/2012

    " social criticism. very good so far. "

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About the Author
Author Neil Postman

Neil Postman (1931–2003) was chairman of the Department of Communication Arts at New York University and founder of its Media Ecology program. He wrote more than twenty books. His son Andrew Postman is the author of five books, and his work appears in numerous publications.

About the Narrator

Jeff Riggenbach has narrated numerous titles for Blackstone Audio and won an AudioFile Earphones Award. An author, contributing editor, and producer, he has worked in radio in San Francisco for the last thirty years, earning a Golden Mike Award for journalistic excellence.