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Download Swann's Way Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Swanns Way Audiobook, by Marcel Proust
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (13,011 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Marcel Proust Narrator: Neville Jason Publisher: Naxos AudioBooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2001 ISBN:
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Swann's Way is the first part of Marcel Proust's monumental, seven volume Remembrance of Things Past. Here, Proust's vision, psychological understanding and vivid powers of description combine to create one of the most poetic and magical works in all literature. For lovers of the original text there are new delights to be found in this audiobook version, while those discovering the work for the first time may be surprised to find it so accessible. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellery | 2/14/2014

    " It took me a little while to get into it but once I did...wow. Some truly beautiful stuff here. The arc of Swann's feelings for Odette are strikingly familiar, and the descriptions of the Verdurin group are hilarious. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel | 1/28/2014

    " The feeling of being finished after about two years is definitely five stars. Certain passages are five stars. But I've been leaning heavily toward brevity lately. And it could be that the (sadly, growing) language barrier made me enjoy this less than I might have. The clearest rating is probably this: I'm not going to keep this copy, but I will certainly pick up other volumes of ALRDTP if I see them at a book sale for cheap. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marusa | 1/25/2014

    " One of the best books I've ever read and not because of the story itself, but because of Proust's way of writing. He makes even the most ordinary things look extraordinary! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Iris | 1/13/2014

    " i surrender. there's a reason why most ppl can only name one famous scene (the madeline tasting) from his journal: it happens on pg44 of 445 in my edition, at the top... not the right book right now, though i acknowledge only a 10% chance of picking it up again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Larissa | 1/8/2014

    " The sentences, memories, and storytelling that Proust weaves in this book are all so smoothly drawn out. You definitely are along for a wonderfully complex and rich ride. It was so good I'm planning to read it a second time (translated by another favorite author, Lydia Davis). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark | 1/8/2014

    " nothing is any better than this.(32) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jenn | 1/4/2014

    " Okay, I did manage to finish this one - and it is SO worth it. Took me four or five years but it's very easy to dip in and out of it. That's the advantage of books that are low on plot. Actually thinking about re-reading this one - there's a new translation out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dmalosh | 12/10/2013

    " I like commas a great deal. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sara Morrison | 12/6/2013

    " This is all the farther I got in the Time cycle.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 pollytomat | 8/6/2013

    " The pace was hard to keep up with. It's a very slow book where action is not as important as the emotions of characters. Despite that, the book is still enjoyable. I was particularly pleased with the role of the music in the story. Extremely beautiful! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robert | 7/2/2013

    " The subject is emotion, the stories are the instrument he uses. The Combray section can be hilarious, the Swann In Love section is almost too painful to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stray Taoist | 7/8/2012

    " Proust. 'nuff said. Funny, sad, no novelist has ever portrayed the range of male emotions, from lovestruck to starstruck, adolescent to adult, so well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 3/16/2012

    " i wish i could give this 4.75 stars. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Janelle | 10/19/2011

    " Tedious is the best word to describe it. Many pages describing falling asleep, the steeple of a church, etc etc. At this point I don't have an inkling of desire to read the other 6 books! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard Lodge | 9/24/2011

    " The whole thing - all three volumes - took me years to read, on and off. But it is wonderful, beautiful, strange, inspiring, troubling, gorgeous, thought-provoking. An indulgence, a mirage, a miracle. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Daniel | 4/30/2011

    " This was interesting, but not my thing. I enjoy and prefer novels. This was more the result of a writing workshop exercise turned manuscript. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joshua | 4/29/2011

    " Slowly, slowly sinking into the astonishingly sensual memory-world of Proust. At forty, I think I'm finally old enough to appreciate it. Reading the Moncrief but I'd like to check out the Lydia Davis translation as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 4/18/2011

    " That famous description of the madeleine pretty much sums it up. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Riodelmartians | 4/11/2011

    " Got the through this one. Five more to go. A magical time machine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ke | 4/10/2011

    " There were many interesting descriptions that may be perceived as cliche now.

    Some parts bored me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lemar | 3/24/2011

    " This is a book whose ideas can transcend translation. that said the translation by Lydia Davis is a thing of beauty. This is the first of the books that comprise In Search Of Lost Time and I strongly encourage readers to go chronologically through as the payoff is well worth the effort. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wendy | 3/20/2011

    " Omg, I hated reading this. I could tell you why, like a real book review, but I can't even deal. I'm just glad I'm finally done. Freedom!!!!
    Book dish: madeleine. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jonathan | 3/13/2011

    " Fabulous translation, but why isnt her translation of Madame Bovary also listed online? Get it if you can. [OK, now added] "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Pwilczewski | 3/6/2011

    " Another book that I didn't actually finish reading, there were parts that were brilliant but I found the pace insufferable and the themes uninteresting - sorry Proust. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally Anne | 3/6/2011

    " It is amazing. Which is not to say that I always liked it. "

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About the Author
Author Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust (1871–1922) was a French novelist, essayist, and critic, best known as the author of Remembrance of Things Past, a monumental work of fiction published in seven parts from 1913 to 1927.

About the Narrator

Neville Jason is an award–winning narrator, as well as a television and stage actor. He has earned seven AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award for best narration. He is a former member of the Old Vic Company, the English Stage Company, the Royal Shakespeare Company, and the Birmingham Repertory Company. While training at the prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, he was awarded the diction prize by Sir John Gielgud.