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Download Summer's Freedom Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Summers Freedom (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Barbara Samuel
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (576 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Barbara Samuel Narrator: Paul Fleschner Publisher: Barbara Samuel Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2013 ISBN:
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Fans of Barbara Freethy, Susan Mallery, and Robyn Carr will love this powerful, full length contemporary romance novel by award-winning Barbara Samuel.

Joel Summer knew about living with lies - his past forced him to - but loving with lies was different. Every day he spent with sweet Maggie Henderson, every time she looked at him with deepening trust, he wrestled with his deception. As their precious, innocent springtime moved toward heated, dusky summer, could he halt the churning wheels of fate, prevent the truth from escaping and keep Maggie believing in him?

Her brawny neighbor gently liberated man-shy Maggie - body and soul. Days with Joel were perfect...night, breathless with splendor. Still, like the birds of prey he cared for, a fierce intensity sometimes swooped into his eyes, hinting at inner torment. But surely love would release him into joy....

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karan Johnstone | 2/15/2014

    " The author visited DMMS and Ryan got the book signed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 kiki Jones | 2/7/2014

    " This book can be involved in a discussion about segregation and the Civil Rights movement. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily Rosbottom | 2/6/2014

    " This heart-touching book about two best friends in the 1960s is a good way to introduce today's children to past racism. I love that one of the boys is white and one is black, and that the white boy doesn't care about his best friend's skin color. Beautiful artwork. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel Yingling | 1/27/2014

    " This is a good book to give young students an idea of what things were like before everyone had equal rights. Joe and Henry are best friends but Joe is white and John Henry is black so they aren't allowed to swim together at the pool. Then laws are changed so they can but some people don't like this new change. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda Taylor | 1/21/2014

    " Loved this book. Great to teach not only about diversity but also about friendship. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachel | 1/19/2014

    " About two boys who are friends despite the face that they are in the south during civil rights. Deals with segregation and friendships without boundaries. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 L12_luisespinoza Espinoza | 1/17/2014

    " This book tells a moving story about two best friends set in the backdrop of the segragated south during 1964; Joe is Caucasian and John Henry is African-American. The boys know each other because John Henry's mother works as a housekeeper for Joe's family. In addition, they have many similar interests, like shooting marbles, swimming, and wanting to be firefighters. However, there are things that John Henry cannot do, like walking through the front door of the General Store or swimming in the town pool. One night, though, Joe's father mentions at the dinner table that the town pool will be open to everyone in town the following day because as his mom states, "That's the new law". As soon as Joe hears this, he runs to tell John Henry. The following day, they both race to the town pool only to find that it is being filled with asphalt and come to the realization that it takes more than a law to change people's hearts. This incident angers the boys and affects Joe to the point that he starts to wonder what it must be like for his friend John Henry to live in this town. These thoughts drive Joe to make a simple, yet powerful statement: "I want to see this town with John Henry's eyes". The story ends on a somewhat happy note when the boys decide to be bold by going to the General store to buy ice pops; but this time, they both decide to walk together through the front door. The book has an author's note at the beginning of the text, giving a brief explanation of the background of the setting and time period in the story. I feel this can give students a good understanding of some of the issues that were going on during this time period. The story does a really nice job of depicting the disposition and emotions that existed with segragation and does it in a way that is relatable to students, considering the diversity that exists in today's classrooms. As such, the book can be an excellent catalyst to discussions about the civil rights movement of the 1960's. There are also a lot of activities that can come out of this book. For example, the students could write journals about the main characters and having them relate to the characters feelings. The book is also an excellent resource due to the dynamic nature of the topic, and hence, can be used for readers grades 1-6. This Coretta Scott King award-winning book is definitely one that needs to be part of your library collection. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy | 1/15/2014

    " Great book for many lessons. Love to use it to teach summarizing, theme, setting (time and place), and history as related to segregation. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan | 1/15/2014

    " A very effective way to introduce kids to prejudice against African Americans during the civil rights era. I loved that it was told from the perspective of two young boys, best friends, one black and one white, and their not understanding the problem, NOT liking it, but still being affected by it. For kids today, it is not something than can be understood, but an attitude they need to be aware of. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna | 1/9/2014

    " A picture book that explores race realtions in 1964. Although it is fiction, it is based on real events. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather Ligman | 12/12/2013

    " my favorite book I've ever heard that deals with racism and slavery. the descriptions are wonderful and the pictures are fabulous. I believe discussions could be started as a result of this story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebekah Jones | 11/30/2013

    " I liked this book because of the friendship that the two boys had to one another. They were loyal and enjoyed each others company. I liked the illustrations. The story showed diversity. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Olivia Jackson | 11/8/2013

    " This is an absolutely wonderful book to teach the history of segregation from a child's perspective. It would be best if read in a third grade or older classroom, but with proper explanation it could be used in lower grades as well. This is certainly a book to keep on hand. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 9/5/2013

    " Annotation: In 1964, two boys, Joe, who is white, & John Henry, who is black, learn that although the laws about racism may change, that does not change people "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 7/20/2013

    " Kids need to read or be read this book! :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katelyn | 7/14/2013

    " Students loved this story of a friendship overcoming obstacles. Using this book in my theme unit... Could use as point of view as well! Just love it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ledawn | 7/2/2013

    " Wow...great story to show kids how it "used" to be. Kids can't wrap their brains around the kind of hate that existed back in the 60's. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cyndi Whitmore | 3/24/2013

    " Wonderful book for talking about segregation, self determination, and white solidarity with young readers. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bethe | 2/27/2013

    " I love Wiles's chapter books, this, her first book is good as well. Pair it with Glory Be. "

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About the Author
Author Barbara Samuel

Barbara Samuel is an award-winning author and lives in Pueblo, Colorado with her husband and two sons.