Extended Audio Sample

Download Stones into Schools: Promoting Peace with Books, Not Bombs, in Afghanistan and Pakistan Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Stones into Schools: Promoting Peace with Books, Not Bombs, in Afghanistan and Pakistan Audiobook, by Greg Mortenson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (9,238 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Greg Mortenson Narrator: Atossa Leoni Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2009 ISBN: 9781101145876
Regular Price: $25.00 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $20.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

From the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Three Cups of Tea comes the continuing story of this determined humanitarian’s efforts to promote peace through education.

In this dramatic first-person narrative, Greg Mortenson picks up where Three Cups of Tea left off in 2003, recounting his relentless, ongoing efforts to establish schools for girls in Afghanistan; his extensive work in Azad Kashmir and Pakistan after a massive earthquake hit the region in 2005; and the unique ways he has built relationships with Islamic clerics, militia commanders, and tribal leaders. He shares for the first time his broader vision to promote peace through education and literacy, as well as touching on military matters, Islam, and women—all woven together with the many rich personal stories of the people who have been involved in this remarkable two-decade humanitarian effort.

Since the 2006 publication of Three Cups of Tea, Mortenson has traveled across the US—and the world—to share his vision with hundreds of thousands of people. He has met with heads of state, top military officials, and leading politicians who all seek his advice and insight. The continued phenomenal success of Three Cups of Tea proves that there is an eager and committed audience for Mortenson’s work and message.

Download and start listening now!

BK_PENG_001372

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daphne | 2/19/2014

    " Fascinating story with good lessons for community building - one of which, one Mortenson does not appear to get, is that his organization is probably way to dependent on him. Nonetheless, good reading. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Julie Jessen | 2/18/2014

    " Another book that needs an editor. This is not nearly as good as Three Cups of Tea. It's self indulgent and a bit preachy at times which is a shame. The historical and geographical information that is shared is excellent...if you can stick with it. The messages are lost in all the pages. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cheron | 2/10/2014

    " Even with all the controversy, his message is true. Education is the answer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ellanor | 2/6/2014

    " Just read this Christmas gift from Alex-I picked it up on Christmas day and couldn't put it down until I finished it last night-might go back and read Three Cups of Tea again-Greg Mortenson is amazing, an inspiration, this is all quite humbling, and at the same time quite compeling-his energy and devotion to the children is inspirational. I highly recommend to anyone interested in todays issues, solutions for peace and all that is happening in Afghanistan and Pakistan-he is also an excellent resource on the current political landscape. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenny Shanahan | 1/27/2014

    " I liked Stones Into Schools better than Three Cups of Tea mostly because Mortensen himself wrote this one. (Three Cups of Tea was written by Oscar Relin "as told by Mortensen." I think Relin writes in an over-the-top, highly exaggerated way.) There is a great deal of detail in this book (more than is needed) about geography, but I am curious enough about the Middle East (particularly Afghanistan and Pakistan, which are the main features of this book) to hang in there with the info when it became excessive. Thank goodness a glossary is included! It's difficult to keep straight all the people Mortenson mentions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sonya | 1/19/2014

    " I liked this book better than Three Cups of Tea. I think because it was in first person and really seemed more personable. I listened to this on audiobook and the only weird thing with that is that it was narrated by a woman reading as Greg. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Courtney Allen | 1/15/2014

    " A more comprehensive story that flows naturally from beginning to end, but just as inspiring and informative as Mortenson's first book, "Three Cups of Tea". Definitely a MUST-READ. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katelyn | 1/14/2014

    " Read English version... very inspiring stories. Makes me want to jump on a plane right now! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee Ann | 1/3/2014

    " A nice follow up to Three Cups of Tea. I'm amazed at what I've learned about that part of the world. They still need so much. I truly believe that education, especially for girls, is the way to make a change there. Not bombs and guns. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Becky | 12/2/2013

    " I listened to Stones Into Schools through book on tape. I found the cultural information very interesting. I had trouble remembering where I left off or where I was going. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karly | 11/23/2013

    " I am moved beyond words for the plight of our brothers and sisters in Pakistan and Afghanistan as well as at the work being done by Greg and his staff. Incredible. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sriram | 11/13/2013

    " Would have made a nice memoir, but ends up as mediocre fantasy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 6/23/2013

    " the man tells a good story (actually, many good stories). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kim | 5/11/2013

    " Book was difficult to continue reading. Written in first person. Greg was certainly an achiever at gaining financial support for his projects, but not a very engaging read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mcburke3 | 5/10/2013

    " Somewhat of a sequel to THREE CUPS OF TEA by the same author but I think better. Although I struggled with names, the story of the hardship of the landscape, cruelties of war and poverty came through in a tale of haope and hard work. Well worth reading and learning from "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica Marcum | 5/7/2013

    " Great sequel. Not as captivating as the first, but still worth the read. I can't believe the places the CAI has gone. It's truly inspirational! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elaine Langer | 9/20/2012

    " This was another one of those books every American should read. We need to realized fighting with bombs does not do anything but create more kaos and terrorists. Building schools helps eveyone have the ability to help themselves. Greg Mortenosn message is so simple. Why don't we all get it? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tiffany | 6/16/2012

    " Great book, like the first one. I am totally inspired by this story. I totally believe in overcoming poverty, ignorance, and extremism by educating women. Love it! Makes me want to do more good in the world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lex | 3/12/2012

    " I thought the first person viewpoint of this book served his story much better. Though it repeated some of the same adventures as Three Cups of Tea, I vastly preferred Stones into Schools. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen Todd Hagen | 2/3/2012

    " I'd probably give this book 4 1/2 stars. It is a wonderful story, but difficult to follow at times with so many foreign names, places and political considerations. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dianne | 5/17/2011

    " Kind of questioned the advisability of some of the things revealed
    in this book, and thought it was a little odd. Well, maybe because
    it was a little odd. Just after I read it there was a big expose'
    about the book-maybe some, much, all of it wasn't exactly true? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Johanna | 5/14/2011

    " I read this book because it had such a following. When I finished I did not start his second book even though I had it. Something did not wring true for me. Interesting that his charity and stories are now being questioned... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 5/6/2011

    " I actually liked this book better than the first, 3 Cups of Tea. Lots of detail about the people who are helping him. He seems like a sincere person who doesn't do the communication/public relations very well. I am very curious now to find out what will happen after the 60 minutes feature. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy | 4/19/2011

    " If you really want to understand the people of Afghanistan, then read this book. The same goes for Greg's first book, 3 Cups of Tea, except it deals with the people of Pakistan. Greg's organization is my new favorite charity! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 atla | 4/15/2011

    " 2 stars because it is imaginative, moving, and creates a much-needed awareness. No more than that because much of it is (allegedly) untrue, though it is presented as non-fiction. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carol | 4/13/2011

    " This story was enjoyable, educational, and inspirational, but not quite as much so as Three Cups of Tea. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jacquie | 4/12/2011

    " Learned a lot about the history and culture of Northern Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    Still believe the concept of education is the best way to battle terrorism plus giving owenership to the people themselves. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Greg Mortenson

Greg Mortenson is the recipient of Pakistan’s highest civil award, The Star of Pakistan, for his sixteen years of work to promote education and peace. The cofounder of the Central Asia Institute and Pennies for Peace, he lives in Montana with his family.

About the Narrator

Atossa Leoni has been working internationally in film, television, and theater since childhood. Atossa played the female lead “Soraya” in Marc Forster’s film The Kite Runner, based on Khaled Hosseini’s bestselling novel. She currently resides in New York City.