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Extended Audio Sample Spook Country Audiobook, by William Gibson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (9,484 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: William Gibson Narrator: Robertson Dean Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2007 ISBN: 9781429586382
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Tito is in his early twenties. Born in Cuba, he speaks fluent Russian, lives in one room in a NoLita warehouse, and does delicate jobs involving information transfer.

Hollis Henry is an investigative journalist, on assignment from a magazine called Node. Node doesn’t exist yet, which is fine; she’s used to that. But it seems to be actively blocking the kind of buzz that magazines normally cultivate before they start up. Really actively blocking it. It’s odd, even a little scary, if Hollis lets herself think about it much—which she doesn’t. She can’t afford to.

Milgrim is a junkie. A high-end junkie, hooked on prescription antianxiety drugs. Milgrim figures he wouldn’t survive twenty-four hours if Brown, the mystery man who saved him from a misunderstanding with his dealer, ever stopped supplying those little bubble packs. What exactly Brown is up to Milgrim can’t say, but it seems to be military in nature. At least, Milgrim’s very nuanced Russian would seem to be a big part of it, as would breaking into locked rooms.

Bobby Chombo is a “producer” and an enigma. In his day job, Bobby is a troubleshooter for manufacturers of military navigation equipment. He refuses to sleep in the same place twice. He meets no one. Hollis Henry has been told to find him.                                          

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 2/19/2014

    " Almost a four star but the separate stories coming together at the end schtick of Gibson just falls short this time and leads to a very disjointed story that scrambles to pull itself together in the final few chapters. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Todd | 2/11/2014

    " Not the quality of nureomancer, but not a bad summer read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Larry Hogue | 2/3/2014

    " This was my first Gibson read after Neuromancer. (Don't ask me why -- I really liked Neuromancer!) Picked it up in an airport book shop, appropriately. Loved the 3 story lines weaving together, the way he explored arcane practices, the attention to detail in the prose, the way he reveals character through physicality, the overall sense of humanity I feel from the characters as they struggle with forces outside of their control but that they feel they must resist. Some felt the story lines never did come together, but I thought it was better than the ending of Pattern Recognition, which others thought was too pat. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kim | 1/31/2014

    " Gibson now writes in the present. No need to write about the future any more - we are living in it. I loved the interweaving of stories. The product placement was part of the embroidery - not an annoyance as some have found. I loved the collision of the old cold war spooks and the modern cyber crims. Age will out! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lettie Prell | 1/31/2014

    " William Gibson writes beautifully, and his characters are beautifully quirky and unexpected. In Spook Country we see the further development of Gibson's vision of the human increasingly merging with its technological world. Yet this time it's all side-plot to a story of intrigue and the unraveling of secrets. The framework is classic convergence, in which characters who are seemingly unrelated and living their various personal dramas come together at the climax, which compels and fascinates. While my favorite of his remains Pattern Recognition, Spook Country is a recommended read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ed Holden | 1/29/2014

    " Why are Gibson's newest books so hard to penetrate early on? It is as if the opening chapter is designed to weed out the weak, leaving only those who have consumed enough coffee. Fortunately the rest of the book is not bad, though I miss the present tense narratives and future visions Gibson created in his early novels. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris | 1/19/2014

    " Not what I expected from Gibson, but not bad. I think its interesting that he uses brands to set up several scenes; definitely the first time I've seen the word "photoshopped" in print. It says a great deal about how we define our world. Well, maybe just New York City [and Los Angeles:], where much of the book takes place. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chas Sippel | 1/18/2014

    " As usual, we're out on the edge of yesterday, seeking next week (and money, power, cute girls..LOL). I love Gibson's books - in two years I'll be buying whatever technology he's writing about today. Idoru was interesting, too. Being a total pervert, I lIKED the concept. LOLOL "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Colleen | 1/6/2014

    " Now I'm not sure which I want to be - Cayce Pollard (in Pattern Recognition) or Hollis Henry. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alistair Lamb | 1/5/2014

    " A wandering bore of a book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 1/5/2014

    " William Gibson has gotten better and better; still mysterious, but very focused - always an interesting take on the times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gabrielpalley | 12/23/2013

    " a really good vision of what might be going on now. well (but a little neurotically) written. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Robin | 12/11/2013

    " Ugh- did not like this at all. Gave up after a couple chapters. Felt like it was written by an out-of-touch old guy that had read some articles about "technology" and decided to write a "cool" book about what he learned. Ick. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie Kadwell | 12/9/2013

    " Excellent story. Some of the best characterization he's done, but it took me a while to get into, the story didn't start out as quickly as most of Gibson's work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Viva | 12/7/2013

    " William Gibson makes me feel smart. I don't understand half of the tech stuff he writes about... but I feel an increasing level of coolness as the book proceeds. Also, he's one of a mere handful of male authors who can really write a fully dimensional female character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 vaughne | 11/27/2013

    " Excellent book...cyberpunk superauthor William Gibson goes from writing about a future we can only imagine to one that we feel might already exist. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Travis | 9/8/2013

    " An interesting novel. I've always wanted to read William Gibson and will probably do it again. Maybe a little loose for me. I do want to see what I can find out about locative art. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 8/30/2013

    " Hey, Gibson's future caught up with him. This was oddly my favorite Gibson book and it is his first not set in the future. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nick | 7/27/2013

    " Mixed feelings about this one. Certainly a page turner, nice short chapters. Fun having many seemingly separate stories come together. But I'm not sure that all that much actually happened, or something. Not sure I quite see the role all the characters filled. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andres Moreira | 6/13/2012

    " A weird book, it was nice, but sometimes a bit boring maybe. Anyway I like it "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron | 6/5/2012

    " Enjoyable, but anti-climactic. Sets up a great mystery with interesting characters and world-building, and then falls flat and fails to go anywhere with the potential. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mister | 2/7/2012

    " Although numerous things are going on, and it is interesting, there is a curious lack of dramatic tension. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 1/1/2012

    " Well written, but fell a bit short of the future fast-forward spy thriller/dystopian surveillance tale a la Don DeLillo that I was hoping for. In the end it was a muddle of a few interesting ideas, but just didn't coagulate like it should have. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joe Gregorio | 11/3/2011

    " Filled with those trademark riverstone-smooth sentences and spiked with a cynicism that can only come from two terms of a Bush presidency it's less science fiction and more a mark and sweep dump of the unevenly distributed future that's already here. It's like a year of boing-boing, with a plot. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 severyn | 8/15/2011

    " I suspect Gibson of building a universe backwards, with each successive book prefiguring, chronologically, its predecessors. Hats off to him if he is as it'd be a neat thing to do. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 J.I. Greco | 6/16/2011

    " well, they can't all be winners. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kim | 5/25/2011

    " Have not read anything by Gibson that I didn't like. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristian | 5/20/2011

    " The most exciting part of the book occurs in the middle, which is not completely unexpected with Gibson. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lorelei | 5/3/2011

    " Style over substance. Far too much focus on 'cool' stuff like language and ideas and not enough on the bread and butter of good novel making, i.e. characters. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 3/28/2011

    " Great as usual, love the locative technology aspect of this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Heatherokane | 3/27/2011

    " I really like this so far but not as compelling as the first book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 eric | 3/18/2011

    " really great book. love all his books though. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 J.I. | 3/18/2011

    " well, they can't all be winners. "

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About the Author
Author William Gibson

William Gibson, one of science fiction’s most unique and prophetic voices, is the award-winning author of Neuromancer, Mona Lisa Overdrive, The Difference Engine, Virtual Light, Idoru, All Tomorrow’s Parties, and Pattern Recognition, among others. William Gibson lives in Vancouver, Canada with his wife.

About the Narrator

Robertson Dean has played leading roles on and off Broadway and at dozens of regional theaters throughout the country. He has a BA from Tufts University and an MFA from Yale. His audiobook narration has garnered numerous AudioFile Earphones Awards. He now lives in Los Angeles, where he works in film and television in addition to narrating.