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Download So Damn Much Money: The Triumph of Lobbying and the Corrosion of American Government Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample So Damn Much Money: The Triumph of Lobbying and the Corrosion of American Government (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Robert G. Kaiser
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (115 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Robert G. Kaiser Narrator: Erik Synnestvedt Publisher: Polity Audio LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2010 ISBN:
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In this sometimes shocking and always riveting book, Robert G. Kaiser, who has covered Congress, the White House, and national politics for The Washington Post since 1963, explains how and why, over the last four decades, Washington became a dysfunctional capital.

At the heart of his story is money - money from special interests using campaign contributions and lobbyists to influence government decisions, and money demanded by congressional candidates to pay for their increasingly expensive campaigns, which can cost a staggering sum. Politicians' need for money and the willingness, even eagerness, of special interests and lobbyists to provide it explain much of what has gone wrong in Washington. They have created a mutually beneficial, mutually reinforcing relationship between special interests and elected representatives, and they have created a new class in Washington, wealthy lobbyists whose careers often begin in public service.

Kaiser shows us how behavior by public officials that was once considered corrupt or improper became commonplace, how special interests became the principal funders of elections, and how our biggest national problems - health care, global warming, and the looming crises of Medicare and Social Security, among others - have been ignored as a result.

Kaiser illuminates this progression through the saga of Gerald S. J. Cassidy who came to Washington in 1969 as an idealistic young lawyer determined to help feed the hungry. Over the course of 30 years, he built one of the city's largest and most profitable lobbying firms and accumulated a personal fortune. Cassidy's story provides an unprecedented view of lobbying.

This is a timely and tremendously important book that finally explains how Washington really works today and why it works so badly.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Meeks | 1/15/2014

    " As a former lobbyist, reading this was like looking in the rear view mirror. Is it just me who was left with the impression that a great deal of what is wrong with Washington today can be laid at the feet of Newt Gingrich? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ErnestA | 12/28/2013

    " If most voters read this book and votet their best interests and the best interests of the nation, the congress would change in 2010. Do we really want lthe congress to work with integerty? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennelle | 12/27/2013

    " Mainly focuses on one lobbyist, and is really hard to get into. The second half of the book is better, if you can make it through the first half. I should have stopped reading it, but I HATE not finishing books! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Elaine Nelson | 12/24/2013

    " Just couldn't get into it. I'm fascinated by the topic, but this treatment was WAY too inside-baseball. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maureen Flatley | 12/15/2013

    " The history of lobbying.....very, very interesting and not necessarily in the ways you might think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 12/6/2013

    " Great insights into the behind the scenes maneuvering and influence peddling in DC. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John-Paul | 11/7/2013

    " A very boring and typical "expose" of lobbying. I lost interest in the jabs in chapter 2. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zgrinch | 9/22/2013

    " An excellent review of the corrupting influence of money in American politics following the life of a key player in current times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Crbianfool | 9/21/2013

    " Fantastic history of lobbying and the machinations of government. Great read, well researched. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ken | 3/28/2013

    " Slow start, but ended strong. Good discussion of the history of lobbying and election financing from the 1970s until today, and the associated impacts on politics and government. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh | 4/26/2012

    " Great overview of national American politics since 1960, as well as the corrosive influence of money on it. It cannot continue indefinitely. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Motorcycle | 8/26/2011

    " It was good. It supported my dislike of the modern political system, but I wish there was a way to fix it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sharron | 12/6/2010

    " the story is an important one though terribly depressing. the problem is that Kaiser drowns you in details and regrettably there is little narrative flow to hold your attention. he was more interesting when he told his story on Bill Moyers Journal. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Motorcycle | 10/8/2010

    " It was good. It supported my dislike of the modern political system, but I wish there was a way to fix it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John-Paul | 8/13/2010

    " A very boring and typical "expose" of lobbying. I lost interest in the jabs in chapter 2. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ken | 2/8/2010

    " Slow start, but ended strong. Good discussion of the history of lobbying and election financing from the 1970s until today, and the associated impacts on politics and government. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Crbianfool | 11/6/2009

    " Fantastic history of lobbying and the machinations of government. Great read, well researched. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Elaine | 10/20/2009

    " Just couldn't get into it. I'm fascinated by the topic, but this treatment was WAY too inside-baseball. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maureen | 6/19/2009

    " The history of lobbying.....very, very interesting and not necessarily in the ways you might think. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zgrinch | 6/1/2009

    " An excellent review of the corrupting influence of money in American politics following the life of a key player in current times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh | 4/8/2009

    " Great overview of national American politics since 1960, as well as the corrosive influence of money on it. It cannot continue indefinitely. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 4/1/2009

    " Great insights into the behind the scenes maneuvering and influence peddling in DC. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ErnestA | 3/29/2009

    " If most voters read this book and votet their best interests and the best interests of the nation, the congress would change in 2010. Do we really want lthe congress to work with integerty? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennelle | 3/8/2009

    " Mainly focuses on one lobbyist, and is really hard to get into. The second half of the book is better, if you can make it through the first half. I should have stopped reading it, but I HATE not finishing books! "

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