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Download Scorpions: The Battles and Triumphs of FDR's Great Supreme Court Justices Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Scorpions: The Battles and Triumphs of FDRs Great Supreme Court Justices (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Noah Feldman
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (381 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Noah Feldman Narrator: Noah Feldman Publisher: Hachette Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2010 ISBN:
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A tiny, ebullient Jew who started as America's leading liberal and ended as its most famous judicial conservative. A Klansman who became an absolutist advocate of free speech and civil rights. A backcountry lawyer who started off trying cases about cows and went on to conduct the most important international trial ever. A self-invented, tall-tale Westerner who narrowly missed the presidency but expanded individual freedom beyond what anyone before had dreamed.

Four more different men could hardly be imagined. Yet they had certain things in common. Each was a self-made man who came from humble beginnings on the edge of poverty. Each had driving ambition and a will to succeed. Each was, in his own way, a genius. They began as close allies and friends of FDR, but the quest to shape a new Constitution led them to competition and sometimes outright warfare.

Scorpions tells the story of these four great justices: their relationship with Roosevelt, with each other, and with the turbulent world of the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. It also serves as a history of the modern Constitution itself.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cannonhistory Potter | 2/12/2014

    " Good read....especially if you are a 30's dork. Great background on the people that influenced FDR's decision process and who inevitably got the job and how they eventually impacted the Court. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aaron | 10/3/2013

    " Some of the opinions and conclusions that Feldman draws do not seem well-substantiated to me. Plus, having FDR on the cover of the book is slightly miselading - as he dies shortly past halfway in the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dennis | 10/2/2013

    " great read. well written. nicely reviews history and personalities surrounding the depression and FDR presidency "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anners | 9/6/2013

    " I have been waiting for months for this book and I'm SO happy I finally have it. I'm only on page 16 now but I can already tell it's going to be awesome. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Slpeirce | 6/17/2013

    " Interesting. Gives you a lot to think about where the court was, and is today. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason Breedlove | 5/27/2013

    " I learned pieces of American history that I never would have from a history book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brad | 5/21/2013

    " Solid book, interesting details about each of these very important men. Engagingly written, and detailed enough for an attorney (that's me!) to appreciate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 B | 5/4/2013

    " Sometimes the author's speculation was a little too forced and a lot of this is basic material covered in your ConLaw, but it's a fast read with a couple of interesting nuggets. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jaw | 4/10/2013

    " Picked up this book hoping to understand the US Supreme Court better...Difficult but very informative. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 6/21/2012

    " The author, Noah Feldman thought well of FDR but not Truman whom he took every opportunity to disparage. Nevertheless, he gives us an interesting view of those men FDR appointed to the Supreme Court and the inner workings of the court. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Liz | 5/25/2012

    " Interesting introduction to the law of this time period. I liked hearing the personal stories of the judges, but I would have liked a little more information about the law and their decisions. Easy to read and accessible. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew Carruth | 4/15/2012

    " very good and interesting parallels in the first half discussing attitudes around the New Deal and Great Depression and our current financial times "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sean Vangordon | 3/1/2012

    " Very good history of the Roosevelt Court. I liked how it focused on how political the Roosevelt appointments were during the Depression and WWII. Really sets the stage for the Warren Court. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Kelley | 2/26/2012

    " One of the finest books on the Supreme Court justices during the Roosevelt and Truman administrations. A wonderful glimpse into who they were and how the court changed them. One wishes these men were on the US Supreme Court today "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ariel | 6/8/2011

    " A really thoughtful, comprehensive history of the Supreme Court during and just after FDR's presidency. It was interesting, very readable, and well-researched. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 3/22/2011

    " The author, Noah Feldman thought well of FDR but not Truman whom he took every opportunity to disparage. Nevertheless, he gives us an interesting view of those men FDR appointed to the Supreme Court and the inner workings of the court. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul | 3/7/2011

    " what an insight into the workings of the Supreme Court. What a lawyer could love? The different opinions that existed in this august institution and the different philosophies that arise from the many different backgrounds of the justices. It was eye opening. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jason | 2/12/2011

    " I learned pieces of American history that I never would have from a history book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jean | 1/16/2011

    " fascinating stories about the Roosevelt court appointees. In the interest of disclosure, the author is the son of friends. He makes the Court justices comes alive; off their pedestals. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ranjit | 12/30/2010

    " Noah Feldman condenses a tremendous amount of material, including fascinating stories, concise descriptions of legal cases, and even more impressively sharp delineations of different legal theories, to paint this fascinating portrait of Supreme Court Justices appointed by FDR. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anners | 12/3/2010

    " I have been waiting for months for this book and I'm SO happy I finally have it. I'm only on page 16 now but I can already tell it's going to be awesome. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brenda | 12/2/2010

    " Why shouldn't Supreme Court justices lead interesting lives...they are human beings. These four justices did much to advance the causes of equality and justice in this country while having real lives along the way. Paragons of virtue, they were not, but great thinkers they were. "

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About the Author
Author Noah Feldman

Noah Feldman is Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard University and the author of several books, including, Scorpions: The Battles and Triumphs of FDR’s Great Supreme Court Justices. A Senior Fellow of the Society of Fellows at Harvard, Feldman has a bachelor’s degree from Harvard, a law degree from Yale, and a doctorate in Islamic thought from Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He clerked for Justice David Souter on the Supreme Court. In 2003, he served as senior constitutional advisor to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq, and subsequently advised members of the Iraqi Governing Council on the drafting of an interim constitution. He has been a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and is a columnist for Bloomberg View.