Extended Audio Sample

Download Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West Audiobook, by Benazir Bhutto Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (754 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Benazir Bhutto Narrator: Rita Wolf Publisher: HarperCollins Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2008 ISBN: 9780061672620
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 1 votes

From the former Prime Minister of Pakistan, who finished writing this extraordinary book just days before her assassination, comes a groundbreaking vision of how to bridge the widening gap between the Islamic world and the West.

Benazir Bhutto returned to Pakistan in October 2007, after eight years of exile, hopeful that she could be a catalyst for change. Upon a tumultuous reception, she survived a suicide-bomb attack that killed nearly 200 of her countrymen. But she continued to forge ahead, with more courage and conviction than ever, since she knew that time was running out—for the future of her nation, and for her life. In Reconciliation, Bhutto recounts in gripping detail her final months in Pakistan and offers a bold new agenda for how to stem the tide of Islamic radicalism and to rediscover the values of tolerance and justice that lay at the heart of her religion. After reading this book, it will become even clearer what the world has lost by her assassination.

Download and start listening now!

BK_HARP_001603

Quotes & Awards

  • “Benazir Bhutto will go down in history as a courageous leader who risked—and lost—her life in the service not only of her nation, but of values shared by us all. Anyone interested in Pakistan, democracy, or Islam should read this fascinating and important book.”

    Joe Biden

  • “This is one of the most gripping and important books of our era. It's a brilliant manifesto for challenging radical Islam. Benazir Bhutto was an intense but charming woman driven by a crucial mission. Her death makes this beautiful book all the more poignant, and also more necessary.”

    Walter Isaacson

  • “This book is an eloquent reflection of traits which defined the life of Benazir Bhutto—an unshakable optimism about the future, a firm belief in the power of dialogue, and a commitment to democracy. The strength of her message of hope underscores how much was lost in her tragic death.”

    Nancy Pelosi

  • “Benazir Bhutto's book is a powerful and insightful analysis of the formidable challenges that confronted an extraordinary woman who paid the ultimate price for daring to attempt to bring democracy to Pakistan. President Kennedy would have called her a Profile in Courage.”

    Ted Kennedy

  • “This is a courageous and powerful answer to hatred and intolerance, written by an extraordinary woman. Reading Benazir Bhutto's Reconciliation shows just how much we lost with her death. You'll finish it and mourn for what might have been.”

    Arianna Huffington

  • “Pakistan has become the critical battlefield in the so-called war on terror. Reconciliation is the story of a courageous woman and her struggle for democracy and moderation in Islam. Benazir Bhutto, not the extremists who killed her, represented the vast majority of Pakistani Muslims.”

    Peter Galgraith

  • “It is impossible to understand today's world without knowing Pakistan; and impossible to understand Pakistan without reading this book. A courageous woman-tragically killed-speaks to us of reconciliation. We owe it to her—and to ourselves—to listen, comprehend, and act.”

    Madeline Albright

  • “This is a must-listen for anyone who wants to understand the history of the troubled relationship between the Muslim world and the West.”

    AudioFile

  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • A Publishers Weekly Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angela | 2/12/2014

    " Amazing to compare Bhutto's discussion of international politics with say, Palin. I guess you have to dumb it down to stay alive! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 2/12/2014

    " This new book by Bhutto was finished days before her assassination. The first 2/3 are a bit wonkish (unless you were a Government & International Studies major like me) and self-serving, but the last part has some good ideas and insights about the future of the Islamic world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ariana | 1/24/2014

    " A brilliant woman with a message of hope and inspiration. I'm not sure I agreed with her thesis, as well defended as it was, but her perspective on the Middle East and world politics is invaluable. Definitely worth the read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janelle Gilbert | 1/21/2014

    " Well spoken middle-eastern world view of the conflict between Arab Muslim interests and the West. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie H. | 1/11/2014

    " What an interesting book! While I've categorized it as a biography, it's really much more of an extended position paper from Bhutto to the world. In it, she wishes to make three main points. Those points are that: (1) while there is considerable diversity within Islam (as is true for any of the "big three" monotheistic faiths), in recent years it has been hijacked in a manner of speaking to achieve particular anti-Western political ends; (2) that Islam and democracy, the West, and modernity (esp. technology) are not antithetical--with particular emphasis on the democracy variable; and (3) that Islam is very poorly understood in the West, sometimes because of its complexity but just as frequently because of western groups that wish to emphasize the extremist groups to meet their own political agendas (Ann Coulter, anyone?). Bhutto eloquently makes--and demonstrates with benefit of historic and recent examples--the point that, "All children of the Book have suffered from those who would use force in God's name to achieve political objectives" (p. 30). Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West is extremely ambitious in scope. Bhutto provides a wealth of background on Islam, on its history and the dynamic nature of Sharia law. The book gets a bit bogged down in the history of failed democracies across the globe--frequently as a combined result of post-colonial intervention by former colonizers with short-sighted goals of resource extraction (i.e., oil), fighting communism, and/or the war on terror. Despite the long middle bit (which really only seems long because she repeats herself a bit for emphasis), the book is well written, thoroughly researched and, above all the hope that it offers is a fitting testimony to this brave woman and the sacrifice that she, her family (husband remained in Dubai with their underage children so that if the worst happened they would still have one parent), the people of Pakistan and--indeed--the world have made. Sadly, Ms. Bhutto was assassinated just days after delivering her final edited manuscript of the book to her publishers. It's a highly provocative book by a remarkable human, and I thoroughly recommend it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tammy | 1/6/2014

    " Very good, but a tough read because there is so much information to digest. Still, in the end it made me very emotional with the knowledge of her assasination and now a better understanding of her and the reasons she was willing to risk her life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lois | 12/26/2013

    " I think i will re-read this book once i understand more about the PPP. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daniel | 12/20/2013

    " Very political, you can tell that she was still trying to win hearts/minds for electoral purposes (so not necessarily unbiased or truthful), but still worth reading and understanding somewhat of a counter-discourse to popular conceptions of/in Pakistan. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 12/14/2013

    " The courageous life of Benazir Bhutto will inspire and awe anyone who reads this book. A clear vision of reconciliation instead of war, of democracy, of equality. Perhaps the best argument against the theory of "clash of civilizations" to date. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lindsay Gough | 11/5/2013

    " I'm still deciding what I think about the book and Bhutto as a person, but I do think this is a must read in understanding Islam, Pakistan and their relationship with democracy. I learned about a lot that I want to do further research on. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shams Toor | 8/6/2013

    " I respect Ms. Bhutto more than ever for her last book. "Reconciliation' sheds light on a number of issues and is a book that everyone must read if interested in politics in Pakistan. I wish she had lived to write few more books like this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Roger | 1/31/2012

    " A sad commentary on world injustice. Interesting to understand the situation in India from Bhutto's viewpoint. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Salsadancer | 10/22/2011

    " Islam, Democracy, and the West; written by Benazir Bhutto, twice prime minister of Pakistan "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wendy Hollister | 9/8/2011

    " Another reason to be grateful for living in the USA. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shelly | 8/29/2011

    " A very interesting book. Not sure I agree with all the sentiments, but it gives you some insight into Pakistan and Islam. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Monica | 8/1/2011

    " Such an important book. Whether you agree with the Bhutto family politics or not, this book provides invaluable insight into a centuries old conflict. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Salsadancer | 6/9/2011

    " Islam, Democracy, and the West; written by Benazir Bhutto, twice prime minister of Pakistan "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daniel | 1/5/2011

    " Very political, you can tell that she was still trying to win hearts/minds for electoral purposes (so not necessarily unbiased or truthful), but still worth reading and understanding somewhat of a counter-discourse to popular conceptions of/in Pakistan.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darrell | 12/10/2010

    " I had always been fascinated with Pakistani culture and with the deceased Prime Minister in particular, so I have enjoyed it. Very insightful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lyubov | 4/6/2010

    " A wonderful overview of Islam and its struggle to reconcile with modernity. Bhutto brilliantly explains how the real conflict is not the West vs. Islamic world, but the two branches within Islaminc World: pro-democratic, pro-modernity forces vs. regime of intolerance and rejection of modernity. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lindsay | 2/11/2010

    " I'm still deciding what I think about the book and Bhutto as a person, but I do think this is a must read in understanding Islam, Pakistan and their relationship with democracy. I learned about a lot that I want to do further research on. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristin | 1/26/2010

    " This was a good book but hurt my head because it made me think so much! "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Benazir Bhutto

Benazir Bhutto (1953–2007) was the prime minister of Pakistan from 1988 to 1990 and from 1993 to 1996, as well as the chairperson of the Pakistan Peoples Party. Born in 1953 in Karachi, she was the first woman ever to lead a Muslim state. She lived in exile from 1999 until her return to Pakistan in October 2007, two months before her assassination.