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Extended Audio Sample Rabbit Redux Audiobook, by John Updike Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (6,288 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Updike Narrator: Arthur Morey Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Rabbit Novels Release Date: January 2009 ISBN: 9780739376331
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The assumptions and obsessions that control our daily lives are explored in tantalizing detail by master novelist John Updike in this wise, witty, and sexy story. Harry Angstrom--known to all as Rabbit, one of America's most famous literary characters--finds his dreary life shattered by the infidelity of his wife, Janice. How he resolves or further complicates his problems makes for a novel of the first order.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A masterpiece . . . Updike owns a rare verbal genius, a gifted intelligence and a sense of tragedy made bearable by wit. Time

  • An awesomely accomplished writer . . . For God’s sake, read the book. It may even—will probably change your life. Anatole Broyard
  • A superb performance, all grace and dazzle . . . a brilliant portrait of middle America. Life

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Keith | 2/15/2014

    " I decided to read all of the Rabbit books after hearing a podcast in which Richard Ford's trilogy was compared to Updike's series. While I would say that I prefer Ford, I must admit that I liked them. Given my rather negative impression of most of Updike's essays, I was pleasantly surprised. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Toni | 2/1/2014

    " I am somehow determined to make it all the way through this series, though Updike had better improve his game by the next one. At this step, our ambitious Great White Male Novelist takes on race relations in America, circa 1969, with results that would be funny if they weren't so pigheaded and, well, racist. It's all especially galling because it's evident that he thinks himself quite the adept, progressive social chronicler. Still, the man can write, and I'm curious what the Reagan years will have in store for our small-minded American hero. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristen | 1/28/2014

    " rabbit is a scumbag and updike makes middle-class ruts come alive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stewart | 1/28/2014

    " What makes Rabbit one of the most compelling characters in American literature? By all objective accounts he is scum of the earth, a man who ought to be jailed for spousal abuse and child neglect, not to mention his serial adultery, drug abuse, racial epithets and harboring of a fugitive. Yet Rabbit remains a sympathetic figure, because through him Updike creates a mirror; Rabbit's considerable flaws do not sink inward, as part of his character, but bounce outward back at the society he chafes against throughout the novel, specifically the hedonism and strife of the civil rights era in which it is set. In the first book, he sought freedom from the drudgery of domesticity. In this second book, we learn that he has acceded to his suburban fate, and the novel concerns the tragic consequences of his misguided (to say the least!) attempts to reinvigorate his life through one hurtful, reckless act after another. Why don't we hate Rabbit? Because by the end of this masterful work we realize that he hates himself more than we ever could. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Beth | 1/12/2014

    " this is a really dirty book. I can only read 5 pages at a time, and that's only if i'm not eating dinner. Rabbit Redux and eating do not go well together. maybe try reading it in bed? This is a problem because i am now slightly obsessed with rabbit angstrom and finding it hard to find appropriate times to read such a dirty book. this might be because of my puritan mindset, but whatever. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cher | 12/29/2013

    " This novel reads more like a collection of essays about hippies and the Black movement of the 70's in dialogue format. It makes no sense that Rabbit would be hanging out with the young naive idealistic white girl and her druggie civil rights spouting black male friend. None of the book makes any sense as a story. However, it is Updike doing his usual thing of combining together pivotal or extreme concepts or characterizations of a decade or era to make a statement about the times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maureen | 12/16/2013

    " So now I'm eyeing up the next one. Have a feeling that 10 years on Harry won't have a great relationship with his son Nelson (by far the most sympathetic character in this instalment). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Evan | 12/14/2013

    " Updike's signature poetic prose endures, but this chapter in the Rabbit series feels more pointedly uneventful than its predecessor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 12/9/2013

    " It is a brilliant book, but it is also flawed and off-putting. It's gonna take me awhile to figure out how I feel about it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clair | 11/20/2013

    " good style - again, a little depressing but good insight to what happens when people don't know how to talk to one another. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Caitlin | 11/13/2013

    " 4.5 is the real rating--great, Rabbit, Run is better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Craig | 10/9/2013

    " I read the first Rabbit book several years ago, and will probably wait a few years before reading the next one. It's heavy, but it's written so beautifully. Interesting to note that Updike waited 11 years before publishing the second book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mairi | 10/5/2013

    " I was very disappointed by this follow-up to Rabbit, Run. The characters of Jill and Skeeter rang false to me and unfortunately took up a lot of real estate in the novel. I may hate all of the other characters, but they were at least real to me. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Barb | 9/25/2013

    " couldn't even finish it - it just seemed so repetitive, same themes as the first book too. I was hoping to like the whole series but I just can't get into too many Updike books. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Irene | 7/13/2013

    " freud meets the 60's during the time "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robert Wuest | 3/7/2013

    " I like how this man writes. Sets the scenes just right. Characters that act frustratingly human. An attempt to capture the real feel, maybe the soul, of America in the 20th century. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie Johnson | 2/7/2013

    " I liked this book a lot more than the first one. Rabbit becomes a more likable character. I'm looking forward to reading the next one knowing it won the pulitzer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dennis | 7/3/2012

    " This second installment in Updike's Rabbit series is even stronger than the first. I was extremely impressed with the powerful topics handled so deftly. I also felt as though this book really captured the spirit of the time. I really enjoyed this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nora | 4/24/2012

    " Updike's Rabbit series is weird but it start to sort of grow on you by about the 3rd book. I can't say I ever loved this series but I did manage to get through them. He writes in such an impersonal way it's like he leaves the best part out - for me at least. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jonathan | 3/1/2012

    " Tiresome: by the third section, unreadably so. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Magdalena | 2/16/2012

    " Good one. Better than 'Rabbit, Run'. The plot is more captivating, but still lacks some kind of a twist. Must-read if you are interested in the philosophy of the 1960's. Blacks, hippies, drugs, Vietnam - here you can find it all. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ed | 7/16/2011

    " Painfully out of date. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 5/24/2011

    " After reading Rabbit is Rich for book group, I got hooked. I went back and re-read the earlier Rabbit books and was very excited to learn that there was another book. After all, Rabbit dies in Rabbit At Rest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jay | 4/15/2011

    " Wonderfully written, but a little heavy-handed from the perspective of 2010. But like all the Rabbit books, a sharp-eyed account of the country in 1969. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lulu | 4/9/2011

    " re-reading the Rabbit series. still so delicious, and fresh. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laura | 4/3/2011

    " I really don't get these books. Although I quite like his other writings. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nora | 3/4/2011

    " Updike's Rabbit series is weird but it start to sort of grow on you by about the 3rd book. I can't say I ever loved this series but I did manage to get through them. He writes in such an impersonal way it's like he leaves the best part out - for me at least.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Patrick | 2/7/2011

    " Excellent book about the '60s in the United States. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 2/4/2011

    " very well written, but I just don't like the characters. They are too real, too flawed, for fiction. "

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About the Author
Author John Updike

John Updike (1932–2009) was the author of more than sixty books, including collections of short stories, poems, and criticism. His novels have been honored with two Pulitzer Prize Awards, the National Book Award, and the Howells Medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Hugging the Shore, a collection of essays and reviews, received the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism.

About the Narrator

Arthur Morey has won three AudioFile Magazine “Best Of” Awards: in 2011 for Biography and History, in for History and Historical Fiction, and in 2009 for Nonfiction and Culture. His work has also garnered multiple AudioFile Earphones awards, and he has been nominated for an Audie Award. He graduated from Harvard and did graduate work at the University of Chicago. He has won awards for his fiction and drama, worked as an editor with several book publishers, and taught literature and writing at Northwestern University. As a narrator, he has received nineteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award.