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Download Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live Audiobook

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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (421 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Jeff Jarvis Narrator: Jeff Jarvis Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2011 ISBN: 9781442346604
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A visionary and optimistic thinker examines the tension between privacy and publicness that is transforming how we form communities, create identities, do business, and live our lives.

Thanks to the internet, we now live—more and more—in public. More than 750 million people (and half of all Americans) use Facebook, where we share a billion times a day. The collective voice of Twitter echoes instantly 100 million times daily, from Tahrir Square to the Mall of America, on subjects that range from democratic reform to unfolding natural disasters to celebrity gossip. New tools let us share our photos, videos, purchases, knowledge, friendships, locations, and lives.
Yet change brings fear, and many people—nostalgic for a more homogeneous mass culture and provoked by well-meaning advocates for privacy—despair that the internet and how we share there is making us dumber, crasser, distracted, and vulnerable to threats of all kinds. But not Jeff Jarvis.
In this shibboleth-destroying book, Public Parts argues persuasively and personally that the internet and our new sense of publicness are, in fact, doing the opposite. Jarvis travels back in time to show the amazing parallels of fear and resistance that met the advent of other innovations such as the camera and the printing press. The internet, he argues, will change business, society, and life as profoundly as Gutenberg’s invention, shifting power from old institutions to us all.
Based on extensive interviews, Public Parts introduces us to the men and women building a new industry based on sharing. Some of them have become household names—Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Google’s Eric Schmidt, and Twitter’s Evan Williams. Others may soon be recognized as the industrialists, philosophers, and designers of our future. 
Jarvis explores the promising ways in which the internet and publicness allow us to collaborate, think, ways—how we manufacture and market, buy and sell, organize and govern, teach and learn. He also examines the necessity as well as the limits of privacy in an effort to understand and thus protect it. 
This new and open era has already profoundly disrupted economies, industries, laws, ethics, childhood, and many other facets of our daily lives. But the change has just begun. The shape of the future is not assured. The amazing new tools of publicness can be used to good ends and bad. The choices—and the responsibilities—lie with us. Jarvis makes an urgent case that the future of the internet—what one technologist calls “the eighth continent”—requires as much protection as the physical space we share, the air we breathe, and the rights we afford one another. It is a space of the public, for the public, and by the public. It needs protection and respect from all of us. As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said in the wake of the uprisings in the Middle East, “If people around the world are going to come together every day online and have a safe and productive experience, we need a shared vision to guide us.” Jeff Jarvis has that vision and will be that guide.
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Quotes & Awards

  • “This is a superior work. Not only is it well researched and elegantly argued but he makes some original observations about how digital technology is changing the nature of human self-expression.” 

    Financial Times 

  • “A refreshing take on a topic often covered by people who feel that the Internet…threatens to imperil our children and undermine our society.” 

    Forbes.com 

  • “Jarvis offers a persuasive and personal look at why sharing things publicly on the Web should become the norm…Jarvis works methodically in Public Parts to unravel long-held beliefs about why openness online is dangerous…Jarvis’ message of openness will be provocative to many, but what he explores is only the beginning of a revolution that will continue to change how we use the Web—and how the Web uses us.” 

    Detroit Free Press 

  • “A welcome and well-reasoned counterpoint to the arguments that social-networking sites and the easy availability of personal information online are undermining our society and putting our safety at risk…A must-read for anyone interested in the issue of connectivity versus privacy.”  

    Booklist

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeff | 2/2/2014

    " Not as good as What Would Google Do. This book was a more boring read "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julian Haeger | 2/2/2014

    " An interesting discussion of the nuances and history of privacy and publicness. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 1/15/2014

    " what publicness is and why it's important. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michael Dsupin | 1/14/2014

    " Boring. Not nearly as good as What would Google Do. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Trey Hoffman | 1/13/2014

    " I like Jeff Jarvis. This book is a lot of Jeff Jarvis. I don't disagree with most of his points, just not a read for your non-tech types. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ed Bierman | 1/11/2014

    " great and thought provoking -- will never think of new technology as creepy again "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Velanche | 1/10/2014

    " I've listened to this title as an audio book, shortly after its release. I have just listened to This Week is Google (TWIG), where Jeff Jarvis, the author, is a co-host. He's made some pretty compelling arguments on the show that privacy and the Internet can have unintended consequences, especially when companies create products (mainly software and services) that could ultimately very useful, even if a company may use data I volunteer it for other purposes. Google is a good example; though it claims to collect the world's information, I'm not naive to know that it also uses whatever data I give it to try and sell me things. Ultimately, though, Google's services, to me, are so useful, that my giving it information (albeit, selectively) is actually more beneficial than not. What i got out of that is that sometimes, a company, no matter how large or small, is full of people; people who want to change the world, provide services that could be useful to society, and generally push the bounds of technology that could ultimately be beneficial. Jarvis argues that sometimes, policymakers and some privacy advocates tend to leap before they look, potentially stifling innovation for society. Do give it a read, if you can, and do so with an open mind. You may agree, or you may not, but Jarvis does a good job of making his case. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Luis | 1/3/2014

    " Public Parts is a really interesting postulate about the benefits of being open/public, and the advantages it can bring to individuals and society alike. To anyone interested in privacy, society and its current state in web and world affairs it will surely be an enjoyable read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chad | 12/14/2013

    " Very very good, the chapters on the history of privacy is particularly fascinating to me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vahe Andonians | 12/14/2013

    " One of the most important books nowadays. Finally somebody delivers valuable arguments for publicness. These arguments are needed desperately in the countless daily discussions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Juliana | 12/13/2013

    " As an early adopter and software professional there wasn't anything too new here. But I felt the book was a good round-up, concise and I did find myself sharing and discussing what I read with friend and colleagues. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Will | 12/11/2013

    " I used to think that I couldn't run for public office because of secrets from my past. Now I'm not so worried. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vincent Stoessel | 12/4/2013

    " A great "state of the union" overview of the Internet and where it has brought us. Jeff Jarvis really puts our social web in a relevant historical, political and cultural context. Great book for both laymen and technophiles alike. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Renee | 9/20/2012

    " Even better than what would google do. I very interesting take on our current social society and the potential it has. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 RJ | 8/2/2012

    " Lots of huckster-speak here. Somehow all the pages got filled, but this is a whole lot of nothing here. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave Fleet | 7/27/2012

    " Slow to get started, and reads like an academic paper with a solid literature review early on that is tough to slog through. Once you're through that, though, this book is packed with thought-provoking insights and ideas that make the final half a pleasure to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott Sherman | 6/12/2012

    " A very interesting and thought provoking book. How much should we share? How can our tools change the world? Is the Internet capable of the same upheavals and advancements that the Gutenberg press had on governments and society after it's creation? Highly recommended. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Luigi | 2/9/2012

    " Extremely thorough treatise on a very important subject. Is privacy dead and buried? Should people know what information companies, corporates and governments have about you? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gisela | 2/7/2012

    " I particularly liked the comparisons of the current information revolution to the development of the printing press. That pretty much freaked people out, too! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 12/25/2011

    " It was ok. I really liked the beginning and discussions about Facebook privacy and the definition of public changing. All the government policy and corporate stuff is important, but I couldn't stay focused on it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 11/14/2011

    " What is privacy and how should we protect it? Are we sharing too much? I especially liked Jeff's personal stories about why he shares so much on the Internet and why he believes sharing is so beneficial. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Renee | 10/28/2011

    " Even better than what would google do. I very interesting take on our current social society and the potential it has. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sam | 10/24/2011

    " Was a good survey of the sense of what "Public-ness" means in this day and age, what is has been in the past and where it may be headed.
    No earth shattering revelations for me, it just caused me to reconsider some of my views on public-ness. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bing | 10/12/2011

    " Quite an interesting take on privacy, of the kind we hear a lot less from than the fear-mongering type. His writing style is quite readable and enjoyable. Plenty of food for thought. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gilbert | 10/9/2011

    " Excellent coverage of the topic. Exactly as expected. Great history, well researched and very interesting. The concept of privacy is turned on it's head. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vincent | 9/27/2011

    " A great "state of the union" overview of the Internet and where it has brought us. Jeff Jarvis really puts our social web in a relevant historical, political and cultural context. Great book for both laymen and technophiles alike. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chad | 7/10/2011

    " Very very good, the chapters on the history of privacy is particularly fascinating to me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 7/7/2011

    " A-FREAKING-MAZING. Jeff Jarvis is a genius. "

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