Download Paris Stories Audiobook

Paris Stories Audiobook, by Mavis Gallant Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Mavis Gallant Narrator: Lorna Raver, Yuri Rasovsky Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2006 ISBN: 9781483070827
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (393 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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Mavis Gallant is a contemporary legend, a frequent contributor to the New Yorker for close to fifty years, and the undisputed master of the short story. Her peerless prose captures the range of human experience while evoking time and place with unequaled skill. This superb collection of fifteen of Gallant’s stories, edited and with an introduction by bestselling author Michael Ondaatje, gathers the best of her many stories set all over Europe, all written in Paris where she has long lived.

Mysterious, funny, insightful, and heartbreaking, these are tales of expatriates and exiles, wise children and straying saints. Together they compose a secret history, at once intimate and panoramic, of modern times.

Besides an introduction by Michael Ondaatje, this book includes the following stories:

“The Ice Wagon Going Down the Street”
“Irina”
“The Latehomecomer”
“In Transit”
“The Moslem Wife”
“From the Fifteenth District”
“Speck's Idea”
“Baum, Gabriel, 1935-( )”
“The Remission”
“Grippes and Poches”
“Forain”
“August” 
“Mlle. Dias de Corta”
“In Plain Sight”
“Scarves, Beads, Sandals”
Afterword: About the Stories, by Mavis Gallant

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Ms. Gallant…has dared to drift in a disorienting century, always trusting her own imaginative compass. Her fiction, never fooled into trying to keep up with history, will last a long time.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “Mavis Gallant writes some of the most superbly crafted and perceptive stories of our time.”

    Globe and Mail

  • “Mavis Gallant’s finely honed prose captures the small details that illuminate a life.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Gallant’s stories are filled with insights and wonderfully crafted sentences…A 2007 Audie Award Finalist.”

    AudioFile

Listener Reviews

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  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 2/7/2014

    " Simply one of the best volumes of short stories I have ever read. Mavis Gallant is genius! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 2/7/2014

    " This book was listed at the back of Francine Prose's How to Read Like a Writer. Years ago I added the first page or two of suggested reading from Prose's list to my Amazon Wishlist. Last Christmas someone gave me Gallant's Paris Stories and I've only now read all the stories in the collection. I'm not certain I've read more beautiful, direct declaritive sentences. Gallant's prose is so clean it's perfect. Her ability to slip from one character's thoughts to another's, sometimes within the same sentence, is startling and refreshing and entertaining. These stories inspire the imagination; they make me want to write. Some are humorous, others tragic; all reach a level of care and coherency that make the act of reading them one of heightened senses, of an almost anxious pleasure which pleads for them not to end, for the sentences to keep living and breathing with each exact word, each shiny, perfect step forward. Read The Moslem Wife. Read them all, and then find copies of her many collections and read those too. That is my plan. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gail | 2/6/2014

    " I finally gave up on this book. Most of the stories had no point and most were depressing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 2/5/2014

    " Speck's Idea: the Art World trembles before the insightfulness of this brilliant short story. Fun, fun, and fun. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Natanya | 2/3/2014

    " Absolutely delightful. I just discovered Gallant. She is witty and devastating. Her characters have become friends of mine; or, perhaps, they were always friends of mine, who I forgot I knew. Read her, read her, read her. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rusty | 1/19/2014

    " Some of the stories were rambling, circuitous and hard to follow. Others I connected with totally. Ov erall, just OK. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lisa | 1/9/2014

    " I will read anything by Michael Ondaatje, and he wrote the intro and selected these stories. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ken | 1/4/2014

    " A temporary review: this is still one of my favorite short story collections of all time (ranking up there with my love for Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" and Yukio Mishima's "Death in Midsummer." A more detailed review to come... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 12/31/2013

    " I was fascinated by the author's wit. These stories are not happy ones, but they are incisive, intellectually challenging and fun. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Saxamaholly | 12/5/2013

    " I'd never read Mavis Gallant before, but as a Canadian living in Paris, I thought I should. I'll definitely read more of her, love her writing! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer | 11/11/2013

    " Mavis Gallant is a master of the short story. Through wit and humor, she captures the smallest details to reveal humor, sadness, angst of the exile and expatriate in post-war Europe. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donna | 10/8/2013

    " Great author (Canadian) that I discovered much too late! Will definitely read more of her work. Terrific stories, quickly developed, thoughtful, vivid. Really enjoyed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 chris | 7/23/2013

    " A very talented author, some of these stories are a little dry, but a very satisfying collection none-the-less. The attention to detail makes stories about subjects I don't care about far more compelling. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sue | 7/22/2013

    " These stories are scary good. Many of the endings took my breath away. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 B. | 3/21/2013

    " Gallant produces elegant and very technically accomplished short stories, but of the sort one admires rather than loves. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 1/3/2013

    " Superb! She is a favorite. I never get tired of reading Mavis and often recommend her. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Haylee | 5/23/2012

    " Each story takes a little while to get going but once they do, enjoyable. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maggi | 3/1/2012

    " I just couldn't get into this book...unfinished "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 1/4/2012

    " Gallant writes beautifully but some of the stories seemed dated which surprised me. Still, she writes with depth and intimacy. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alexandra | 9/8/2011

    " I read this because I read a story by the author in the New Yorker and liked it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gail | 5/19/2011

    " I finally gave up on this book. Most of the stories had no point and most were depressing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth | 3/10/2011

    " Superb! She is a favorite. I never get tired of reading Mavis and often recommend her. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 1/13/2011

    " Simply one of the best volumes of short stories I have ever read. Mavis Gallant is genius! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 4/21/2010

    " Gallant writes beautifully but some of the stories seemed dated which surprised me. Still, she writes with depth and intimacy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 1/27/2010

    " This collection could be used to teach a course on exactly what the short story should be. Beautiful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Haylee | 1/21/2010

    " Each story takes a little while to get going but once they do, enjoyable. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alexandra | 1/4/2010

    " I read this because I read a story by the author in the New Yorker and liked it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 11/16/2009

    " Speck's Idea: the Art World trembles before the insightfulness of this brilliant short story. Fun, fun, and fun. "

About the Author

Yuri Rasovsky (1944–2012) won wide critical acclaim during his forty-year career as an audio dramatist, writer, producer, and director. His numerous honors included two Peabody Awards, nine Audie Awards, and a Grammy. In 2011, his production for Blackstone, The Mark of Zorro, was nominated for a Grammy. His final production for Blackstone before his death was Die, Snow White! Die, Damn You! He has left behind an incredible legacy.

About the Narrators

Lorna Raver, named one of AudioFile magazine’s Best Voices of the Year, has received numerous Audie Award nominations and many AudioFile Earphones Awards. She has appeared on stage in New York, Los Angeles, and regional theaters around the country. Among her many television credits are NYPD Blue, Judging Amy, Boston Legal, ER, and Star Trek. She starred in director Sam Raimi’s film Drag Me to Hell.

Alexandre Dumas fils (1824–1895), was the illegitimate son of Alexandre Dumas, père, who followed in his father’s footsteps becoming a celebrated author and playwright. In 1831 his father legally recognized him and ensured the young Dumas received the best education possible at the Institution Goubaux and the Collège Bourbon. At that time, the law allowed the elder Dumas to take the child away from his mother. Her agony inspired Dumas fils to write about tragic female characters. In almost all of his writings, he emphasized the moral purpose of literature and in his 1858 play, Le fils Naturel (The Illegitimate Son), he espoused the belief that if a man fathers an illegitimate child, then he has an obligation to legitimize the child and marry the woman. In 1844 Dumas, fils, moved to Saint-Germain-en-Laye. There, he met Marie Duplessis, a young courtesan who would be the inspiration for his romantic novel, Camille (La Dame aux Camillas).