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Download Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Dr. Margaret MacMillan
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (351 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Dr. Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Barbara Caruso Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2011 ISBN:
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Margaret MacMillan brings her extraordinary gifts to two of the most important countries today - the United States and China - and one of the most significant moments in modern history - Richard Nixon's week in China in February 1972, which opened relations between America and China (closed since the communists came to power in 1949). This momentous meeting and visit ultimately laid the foundation for the complex and difficult relationship between China and the United States that we see today. Nixon thought China could help him get out of Vietnam. Mao needed American technology to repair the huge damage of the Cultural Revolution. Both men wanted an ally against an aggressive Soviet Union. Did they get what they wanted? Did Mao betray his own revolutionary ideals? Did Nixon make a mistake in coming to China as a supplicant? And has the United States been at a disadvantage ever since? Drawing on newly available material from China and America, and capturing the personalities at the center of the drama (Henry Kissinger, Pat Nixon, and Chou En-lai among them), this breathtaking history looks at one of the formative moments of the 20th century and casts new light on two countries and their relationship, on into the world of the 21st century.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 2/16/2014

    " Having already read Henry Kissinger's "On China" this book was good but redundant. The format is a little awkward, skipping around from the actual trip to the preparations for the trip and then back again. That being said, this is still a worthwhile and interesting account of the people and events that made Nixon's trip possible. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pnorman811 | 2/16/2014

    " A good way to learn more about both men. It's important to read how we helped bring China to the place it finds itself now. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 1/4/2014

    " i wish i had more time this semester to focus on reading. i felt as if i was forced to read this so quickly, i was not able to stop and really enjoy the process of learning. i would like to revisit this book again when i have more time to read for content. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mk100 | 12/26/2013

    " A terrific primer on a crucial episode. This would not be able to be kept secret today. Really well-written and interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 12/10/2013

    " I really like the format of one pivotal moment surrounded by chapters of context. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christina | 12/10/2013

    " Much detail about the Mao/Nixon meeting in 1972 and the Kissinger/En-Lai meetings that led up to it. The book gave a bit more information than I needed, but it was readable enough that I was able to persevere through to the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel Kukwa | 2/6/2013

    " It isn't quite on the level of "Paris 1919", for one reason: Nixon doesn't usually warrant writing of this calibre, and there's something ironic about a Canadian historian writing the definitive work on a key moment of Cold War detente. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tian Chen | 10/14/2012

    " Engaging. Informative. Author has a lively style, a knack for describing the various players that seems real, and human. Drawing on extensive sources, this is a must-read for anybody interested in one of the most significant events that utterly changed the geo-political balance of the cold war. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tom | 7/28/2012

    " The behind-the-scenes Cold War statecraft makes for compelling reading, here. It is plain to me we need to remember the full arc of Nixon's accomplishment and impact is not merely as a criminal conspirator. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rylan McQuade | 7/25/2012

    " Really, really good. The author does a great job of drawing you into the drama and getting inside of all the characters' heads without growing artificially dramatic on the one hand or boring you on the other. MacMillan is a superb author. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Frédérique | 7/11/2011

    " I'm not sure why it says Nixon and Mao on the cover of this book. It was published under the title "Nixon in China" in Canada. I guess maybe that title was taken in the US. Nixon was kind of awesome despite the evil corruption stuff. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tom | 7/2/2011

    " The behind-the-scenes Cold War statecraft makes for compelling reading, here. It is plain to me we need to remember the full arc of Nixon's accomplishment and impact is not merely as a criminal conspirator. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 1/3/2011

    " It isn't quite on the level of "Paris 1919", for one reason: Nixon doesn't usually warrant writing of this calibre, and there's something ironic about a Canadian historian writing the definitive work on a key moment of Cold War detente.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Halldór | 8/24/2010

    " This books gives much deeper understanding of Nixon and what motivated him in office. The image provided of Mao makes him appear like a monster. Chou En-lai emerges as a key figure. The relationship (or lack there of) between the White House and the State Department puts envents in a new light. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mk100 | 1/4/2010

    " A terrific primer on a crucial episode. This would not be able to be kept secret today. Really well-written and interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jr | 9/24/2009

    " Excellent account of how the Vietnam War ended and how America finally recognized the People's Republic of China. Also shows how paranoid Nixon was! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rod | 6/28/2009

    " Excellent history. Your knowledge of the late 60's and early 70's will certainly be enhanced "

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