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Download My Dad’s a Birdman Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample My Dad’s a Birdman Audiobook, by David Almond Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (143 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Almond Narrator: Sarah Coomes Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2010 ISBN: 9781441890108
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In a rainy town in the north of England, there are strange goings-on.

Dad is building a pair of wings, eating flies, and feathering his nest. Auntie Doreen is getting cross and making dumplings. Mr. Poop is parading the streets, shouting LOUDER and LOUDER, and even Mr. Mint, the headmaster, is getting in a flap. And watching it all is Lizzie, missing her mam and looking after Dad and thinking how beautiful the birds are.

What’s behind it all? It’s the Great Human Bird Competition, of course! Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Phoebe | 2/12/2014

    " Quirky and whimsical are two words that come to mind to describe this book. Little Lizzie is obviously worried about her dysfunctional father who hasn't showered or shaved or apparently done anything for a while, perhaps since her mother died. Her father is a skilled artist who once could make anything--and now all of a sudden the light of inspiration has visited him again, as he intends to enter the upcoming Great Human Bird Competition. This contest has drawn people from all over the world who must propel themselves over the river--somehow. Lizzie's dad has a brilliant plan (he thinks) and soon Lizzie is drawn into it too. The very British vernacular might confuse children, but the story itself is fairly child-appealing in a simplistic way and the art colorful and happy (and Quentin Blake-like), but adults won't be able to help cottoning to some of the more troubling issues that do not really become resolved by the end. Given Almond's previous literary forays into mental illness it is not surprising this book comes from him--it's just more playfully packaged. Also, echoes of Skellig might appear for some of us, with the bird references. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Betsy | 1/30/2014

    " One Sentence Review: Generally Almond's delicate prose and complementary darkness can be alluring to me, but when he shoots particularly young (as he does here) it leaves the reader feeling a bit perturbed in the process. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristin Redmond | 1/29/2014

    " Very cute book about Lizzie and her father. Set in England, she more or less looks after her father. One day he starts acting stranger than usual - eating flies and worms and acting like a bird. Auntie Doreen shows up and she is even more concerned. Lizzie stays back from school to keep an eye on him and now she is worried. It turns out he has signed up for a human flying contest which is why he has made a giant pair of wings! The audio was great. very fun for young kids. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Farida | 1/23/2014

    " This is a lovely, off-beat book about a girl and her father dealing with the grief of the loss of the mother/wife. If there is such a thing as poignant humor, this book has it. Polly Dunbar's illustrations are great-- she's the one who illustrated Here's a Little Poem. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jenny | 1/22/2014

    " I love David Almond's books because they usually combine some really serious heavy stuff with the wonder of childhood, and it is so true to life, I wonder how the author remembers all of those vivid feelings from childhood. That being said, I'm not really sure what to make of this book, his first for "younger readers." Polly Dunbar's illustrations are beautiful, and make the story seem really lighthearted and whimsical, but the delusional, bug-eating dad, dead mother, daugther on her own undercurrent made me uncomfortable -- if I were going to read this aloud to a young child, I would expect some questions and worry. Apart from the fact that the end of the story just doesn't mention all the real problems the family faces, and generally ends happily, the concerns are never really addressed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia | 1/19/2014

    " I'd really give it 3 stars for the story & 5 stars for the art & design. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lindsay | 1/19/2014

    " J ALMOND - fantasy, grief, "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary Z | 1/17/2014

    " Another great David Almond book! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sharidan | 1/13/2014

    " pretty good. it is very fictional though and is retty short. about a man who is half bird. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kyle Turpin | 1/11/2014

    " Just an easy read, and still engaging throughout. Loved it a lot. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Warren Truitt | 1/9/2014

    " Wow! Fantastical, funny, heartwarming/breaking, lovely ... Almond's Dahl-like story and Dunbar's illustrations combine magically. My pick for best Young Reader of 2008 so far! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Minnie | 1/4/2014

    " This book is about a dad who wants to enter the flying bird competition and so the dad acts like a bird.his daughter Elizibeth enters with him but her crazy aunt trys to stop them! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenna Mills | 12/8/2013

    " Awwww kinda heart-warming tho completely bonkers. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Linda | 11/14/2013

    " The story as always is well told, I just prefer his darker eccentric characters. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa | 8/28/2013

    " A good book. Quirky, unusual, odd... but fun. What I really liked, though, were the Quentin Blake-esque illustrations. They were absolutely charming. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Edna | 4/10/2013

    " This story is a bit odd and Roald Dahl-ish with young Lizzie, after her mother's death, doesn't know whether to support, empathize or prevent her father, who thinks he's a birdman, from entering The Human Birdman Competition. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elizabeth Harris | 12/6/2012

    " Cute children's book with clever names and a fun story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 5/25/2012

    " Very fun and quirky! I have to admit that I have never read a David Almond book that I didn not like. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 1/26/2012

    " A metaphor with dialogue in the cockney accent. It's about much more than entering a human bird contest. It's about togetherness and finding happiness when you're lost inside the pit of grief. Cute short novel from an odd bird author. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Trish | 1/4/2012

    " I just found this creepy and odd - couldn't get into it and can't imagine who I'd recommend it to.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Edna | 12/4/2010

    " This story is a bit odd and Roald Dahl-ish with young Lizzie, after her mother's death, doesn't know whether to support, empathize or prevent her father, who thinks he's a birdman, from entering The Human Birdman Competition. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sharidan | 5/27/2010

    " pretty good. it is very fictional though and is retty short. about a man who is half bird. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 3/7/2009

    " Very fun and quirky! I have to admit that I have never read a David Almond book that I didn not like. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Minnie | 1/27/2009

    " This book is about a dad who wants to enter the flying bird competition and so the dad acts like a bird.his daughter Elizibeth enters with him but her crazy aunt trys to stop them! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Trish | 1/3/2009

    " I just found this creepy and odd - couldn't get into it and can't imagine who I'd recommend it to.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa | 11/11/2008

    " A good book. Quirky, unusual, odd... but fun. What I really liked, though, were the Quentin Blake-esque illustrations. They were absolutely charming. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Farida | 10/6/2008

    " This is a lovely, off-beat book about a girl and her father dealing with the grief of the loss of the mother/wife. If there is such a thing as poignant humor, this book has it. Polly Dunbar's illustrations are great-- she's the one who illustrated Here's a Little Poem.

    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Becky | 9/25/2008

    " This is a beautiful book. It is a beautiful story, with beautiful writing, beautiful pictures, and a beautiful heart. In a totally real and non-cheap way. You'll like it! David Almond is a winner! :) "

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About the Author
Author David Almond

David Almond has received several major awards, including a Hans Christian Andersen Award, a Carnegie Medal, two Whitbread Awards, an Eleanor Farjeon Award, and a Michael L. Printz Award. He is known worldwide as the author of Skellig, Clay, and many other plays, stories, and novels, including The Boy Who Swam with Piranha. David Almond lives in England.

About the Narrator

Sarah Coomes trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London and spent three blissful years there, learning how to cry, speak Shakespeare, and stage fight like a tiger. She is a comedienne and an actress, appearing in numerous television shows in England, including a recurring role as Nurse Leonard in the popular series EastEnders. She won the 2008 Westminster Prize for her play Hookie and an AudioFile Earphones Award for her narration of The Unforgotten Coat by Frank Cottrell Boyce in 2011.