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Extended Audio Sample Misquoting Jesus: The Story behind Who Changed the Bible and Why Audiobook, by Bart D. Ehrman Click for printable size audiobook cover
2.99935306485525 out of 52.99935306485525 out of 52.99935306485525 out of 52.99935306485525 out of 52.99935306485525 out of 5 3.00 (6,183 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Bart D. Ehrman Narrator: Richard M. Davidson Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2016 ISBN: 9781440780615
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For almost 1,500 years, the New Testament manuscripts were copied by hand—and mistakes and intentional changes abound in the competing manuscript versions. Religious and biblical scholar Bart Ehrman makes the provocative case that many of our widely held beliefs concerning the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity, and the divine origins of the Bible itself are the results of both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes. In this compelling and fascinating book, Ehrman shows where and why changes were made in our earliest surviving manuscripts, explaining for the first time how the many variations of our cherished biblical stories came to be, and why only certain versions of the stories qualify for publication in the Bibles we read today. Ehrman frames his account with personal reflections on how his study of the Greek manuscripts made him abandon his once ultra-conservative views of the Bible.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Absorbing…fresh and lively prose and seasoned insights.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenn | 2/20/2014

    " This book raises some interesting questions. Questions I've heard in passing at other times, but have never really thought much about. Imagine if one of the scribes was an extremist like, say, Fred Phelps of the Westboro Baptist Church. If just one of the scribes subscribed to extreme theories, where would we be? He could change the bible in his copying and all of the sudden, there's information that was never meant to be there. As the author says, perhaps the original works were inspired, but what we're now looking at are not those works. So, where does that leave us? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Giulia Fiora | 2/14/2014

    " An interesting theory but I found most of his claims to be more skepticism then actual sound fact. If what he says is true however, then it's definitely earth shaking about what Christianity has been built upon. I don't doubt that consecutive manuscripts of the New Testament were edited or changed. I think that happens frequently. Just think of a game of telephone for example. But if none of what's in the New Testament is actually true, then how do you explain all of the powerful spiritual experiences I've had. I don't think it's as black and white as Ehrman makes the Bible out to be. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marvin | 2/2/2014

    " Excellent book on the origins of the writings that make up the Bible. Or more precisely the way the original scriptures were changed, sometimes by error and sometimes on purpose. Anyone interested in the origins of Christianity and how it changed from a "cult" with various factions to a world-wide religion must read this book. Ehrmann not only points out how certain sections of the gospels were changed or added on but he goes into detail on how historians do their detective work in trying to get as close to the source as they can, which is not an easy feat when even the closest writings we have about Jesus are 60-100 years after the fact. The author relate this information with the utmost respect. This book should be appreciated by anyone with a serious interest in the history of Christianity whether they are Christian or not. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ian | 1/24/2014

    " An oddly encouraging book due to the fact that Ehrman, despite being clearly very educated and clearly bent on discrediting scripture, can summon up surprisingly little here to even begin to make his case. I was left thinking, "Huh, if this is the best they've got, there must not be any significant textual variations to speak of." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maura | 1/23/2014

    " I really wanted this to be a longer book than it was. It gives an overview of techniques scholars use to analyze how the Gospels have changed over the years (due to scribes making mistakes, or scribes intentionally changing wording or inserting new passages). It even gets a little into the differences between the 4 gospels and what one might consider the "truth" if you sort out all the differences between them. But it's not as in-depth as I really wanted -- more of an overview before you would jump into really doing any real thinking about the topic. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carole | 1/13/2014

    " Interesting but a bit dry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carol | 1/10/2014

    " This is not an easy read but very interesting. I always knew the bible we have today was not the original but now I have some clue about how it became what we have. I have long known the importance of words this just reinforces my opinion. If you like history you will enjoy this. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Val Cartwright | 12/29/2013

    " Ehrman's point is unclear and frankly rather boring. I doubt that this one will be finished, now that school's back in session. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trevor | 12/23/2013

    " While I don't agree with all his conclusions, this is a good introduction into what the New Testament is, where it came from, and why it's imperfect. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennelle | 12/6/2013

    " Engrossing look at the way modern religion twists the original meaning of the Bible. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve Sessions | 9/29/2013

    " It was good, gave me a new perspective on how the current bible came to us, and gave me more understanding on the gospels and what each author was trying to portray to everyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bruce | 8/6/2013

    " Not the most exciting to read but it was very informative about how the New Testament came about and and why there are differences between the 4 gospels. Also, it describes some of the changes in words and meanings that have occurred over time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maggie | 6/13/2013

    " I don't agree with him, but I appreciate his insights. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sheryl | 3/27/2013

    " This book was just a confirmation of the materials I learned at Bangor Theological Seminary in my New Testament courses. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Yakov Israel | 10/22/2012

    " Well said Alice from Phoenix.. This book is of the devil. There were so many pagans trying to change True Christianity and make it say something it doesn't. The word 'Trinity' might not be in the Bible, but the concept certainly IS. The Most correct book on earth, says: Baptize them in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Second, in the Torah, God said Let US create man in Our image... Only God is the Creator of man. In proverbs, the (so-called "Old" Testament), God said He has a Son, way before the NT existed. The fact is, God is a union of more than one as the Hebrew PROVES this from Genesis to Revelation. Those who don't like the Trinity or the belief in God, THEY changed it as the dead sea scrolls proves. This Book is rubbish. Serious scholars must take time from their own productive study to respond to the baseless twaddle contained in its pages just to riddicle this idiot author. This book is for pagans only to justify their infidel beliefs. These books should be burned and not one penny should be given to the author or his cause. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alice | 10/15/2012

    " I was 28 yr. old when I first learned why it is logical and sane to believe the Bible IS God's unchanging and unerring word to us. I could not believe I was almost 30 yr. old (well educated--or so I thought) without ever hearing about even one pro-Bible piece of evidence. The vast amount of inarguable proof supporting the irrefutable historical, scientific, geological, and 100% accuracy on every prophetic event is something that I never, ever heard before? The only prophesies left to come true are about the Second Coming of Christ--and He's not here yet. The first comment above was quite accurate: the book is not for someone who has heard, read, and believes in God of the Bible. It's not for anyone who understands the simple truth of Jesus, the Bible, and trusts in God's plan and interest in our lives. A large percentage of the time the critic won't even explore the possibility that maybe there really is only one truth, one love, and one God. Yet people won't research the theories, and instead take on the immature and ignorant position of "contempt prior to investigation." (one could start researching at jude3.com or read Lee Strobel's book "Case for Christ") Moving on now, the author is completely wrong about the scripture being slopped together by "imperfect" humans." Boys started in their teens to learn how to be a scribe, and then they had to work for years as an apprentist to make sure the Word of God is 100% accurate. These guys had to destroy any copies with a mistake, and a "mistake" could be found when the master scribe begins to measure the letters and spacing using a hair. Yup. They were committed accuracy! Scrolls HAD to be perfect to be distributed. (By the way, we are all imperfect. THAT'S the whole point of Jesus obeying God, and NOT as a martyr, and stepping up to the plan of eternal salvation for people because of the Resurrection, and the unique and simple act of inviting Jesus into our hearts and accepting His gift of Grace. Chritianity is the ONLY religion where "works" on earth by man is not how he makes it to the Main Event. Jesus paid that admission for us. We have not a thing to earn, only the grace to accept His "no-strings-attached" salvation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Betty Cross | 9/13/2011

    " I'll make a more detailed review later. Now I'll content myself to say this book is fascinating. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Crystal | 7/27/2011

    " Very interesting and intuitive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rick | 6/15/2011

    " If you believe the Bible to be mistake-free and unchanging through the years this book is NOT for you. This is especially true for those who believe that the KJV is the final word of God. The Bible, according to the author, is a human construction and subject to human imperfections. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary Frances | 6/12/2011

    " Could have been much better if it was not so repetitive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Asails | 6/11/2011

    " It was a good work and I plan to read it again before I finish my next write. I have been scrutinized and disappointed by Christian friends who seem to think this book is written by the devil. They cannot be more wrong. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 6/3/2011

    " It was good, gave me a new perspective on how the current bible came to us, and gave me more understanding on the gospels and what each author was trying to portray to everyone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Uli | 6/2/2011

    " Love! Fascinating, must read for anyone who is or knows a Christian! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jack | 5/22/2011

    " It was a good work and I plan to read it again before I finish my next write. I have been scrutinized and disappointed by Christian friends who seem to think this book is written by the devil. They cannot be more wrong. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 5/3/2011

    " a little dry for an audiobook--my mind would wander into traffic sometimes--but on the whole, a fascinating subject. I'll never look at those oh-so-familiar phrases again without wondering which is real and which is memorex? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 4/18/2011

    " Interesting stuff but not as well written or organized as his subsequent books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Smoovp | 4/18/2011

    " I like this book very much. Seeing how The Bible has been manipulated over the past 1600 years by imperfect men with imperfect agendas is, I think, a welcome answer to some of the claims that some folks like to make about The Bible - what it is and what it isn't.

    Highly recommended. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Abbey | 4/11/2011

    " A primer course on how the bible was assembled and mutated over the years. Definitely worth a read, though I'd recommend "Jesus, Interrupted" over this one, as this is pretty dense with arcane details. "

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About the Author
Author Bart D. Ehrman

Bart D. Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 1988, after four years of teaching at Rutgers University, he came to Chapel Hill, where he has served as both the Director of Graduate Studies and the Chair of the Department of Religious Studies. Among his fields of scholarly expertise are the historical Jesus, the early Christian apocrypha, the apostolic fathers, and the manuscript tradition of the New Testament. He has published extensively in these fields, having written or edited over twenty books, numerous scholarly articles, and dozens of book reviews. Professor Ehrman is married with two children, a daughter and a son, and lives in Durham, North Carolina.

About the Narrator

Richard M. Davidson is an actor and Earphones Award–winning narrator. Trained at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, he is well versed in theater and has had a long-standing career in acting, including a lead role in the show Diamonds, which aired on the CBS network, and a part in ESPN’s The Hustle.