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Download Marching for Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Don't You Grow Weary Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Marching for Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Dont You Grow Weary Audiobook, by Elizabeth Partridge Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (338 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Elizabeth Partridge Narrator: Alan Bomar Jones Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2011 ISBN: 9781441868817
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The eerie silence was broken only by the sound of scuffling feet as marchers approached the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The mood was sober. Hundreds of men, women, and children had been protesting in Selma for weeks to win black Americans the right to vote. They’d been threatened. Been arrested. Jailed. This march was likely to end in violence, yet they went anyway. But when state troopers attacked with billy clubs and tear gas, the brute force was a shock. Many were injured, including children. But not even Bloody Sunday, as March 7 came to be known, was enough to deter the marchers. Led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., they were committed to the voting rights movement despite the risks. Not even the youngest protestors gave up, and their defiance and courage were inspiring. Without them the struggle in Selma — which culminated in a five-day march to Montgomery — might have failed. Marching for Freedom tells the story of how ordinary kids helped change history. Award-winning author Elizabeth Partridge explores the events at Selma from their point of view, drawing on vivid recollections of some of those who marched as children. Dramatic photographs capture the danger and spirit in Selma during the turbulent spring of 1965 and offer a stunning visual narrative to the audio. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “An excellent addition to any library.”

    School Library Journal

  • “Gripping profiles of young people who made a difference.”

    Booklist (starred review)

  • “A sharply focused historical narrative for a younger audience.”

    Horn Book (starred review)

  • “A captivating, personal account.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • “A dramatic and a memorable statement.”

    VOYA (starred review)

  • Winner of the 2009 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature
  • A 2010 ALA Notable Book for Youth
  • Winner of the 2010 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Nonfiction

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alicia | 2/18/2014

    " This accessible nonfiction story of the Freedom Marches beginning in 1963 was amazing with the stark black and white photographs of important figures in the marches, personal stories, and a basic timeline of events. The heavy-hitters like Dr. King and Rosa Parks, but also stories of little girls joining up, a one-legged man marching the entire distance, and a old woman who ran a general store to help feed and shelter marchers. Very easy and worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 2/17/2014

    " This is a very readable account of the civil rights movement, focusing on the contributions and involvement of children in activities focused on Selma Alabama in 1965. Not only is the text very engaging, following real children through different events, but the pictures of the events and the children are compelling and are reproduced in amazing quality. This book really brings the marches and protests to life, allowing children to glimpse what it was like to be engaged at that time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 2/16/2014

    " Marching for Freedom is a powerful, enotional and factual look at how young people contributed to the Civil Rights movement in Bloody Sunday and the Selma to Montgomery March in the quest for voting rights. It is evocative of the times and very accessible, with bold black and white photographs that illustrate the well researched text. It does not back away from brutality, but illustrates the bravery and endurance of young people. The lyrics of the songs of the marchers are powerful. Already an award winner and certain to win more, this book is highly recommended for readers grades 5 and up. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shaundell | 2/12/2014

    " This book was a National Book Award Finalist and the winner of SLJ's Battle of the Books - and I can see why! After seeing photos of the Selma-Montgomery march, Elizabeth Partridge read everything she could find on the topic and was hooked. She spent many months researching, interviewing, and writing this book, which is told through the viewpoint of teenagers and children. Fascinating! She did a wonderful job bringing the story to life through her text and photos. I also enjoyed hearing her speak at the BYU Symposium about her experiences with narrative non-fiction. I look forward to reading more books by my dear friend, Elizabeth! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda Martinez Kirby | 2/4/2014

    " Wonderful book for Black History month. The book is very moving, but I thought it was actually a little advanced for the group it is targeting. It is aimed at children, but some of the words would be difficult for school aged children to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Virginia Walter | 1/27/2014

    " Partridge uses photos, song lyrics, and first-person accounts to tell the story of the historic Civil Rights march from Selma to Montgomery in 1965, focusing on the participation of children and teens. It is a powerful, moving story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jason Penckofer | 1/22/2014

    " Another moving and informative chronicle of the civil rights movement. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mari | 1/14/2014

    " Great non-fiction! Great photographs! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/6/2014

    " This book is a play by play account by months in 1965 leading up to the Civil Rights Act passage. Very hard stuff to read about, but written in a way to put yourself in the shoes of people who just had to march for what was right. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Reyer Lummis | 12/18/2013

    " A very thoughtful book lot's of good pictures and meaningful text "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam | 11/8/2013

    " This haunting account of the Selma Freedom Fighter's protests, which eventually led to the passing of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, is not to be missed. Partridge does a wonderful job of exploring what it was like to be one of the ordinary people that helped the movement forward. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greta | 9/13/2013

    " Everything Elizabeth Partridge does is phenomenal. She is an amazing writer and her books are works of art with word and visual images as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liddy | 1/21/2013

    " Wonderful book about the march from Selma to Montgomery, focusing on the young people who marched and sang and made a difference. Clear, well written, compelling story. Fabulous images. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa | 1/21/2013

    " Simple: shows what the power of a well-told story and some gripping photographs can do. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 10/4/2012

    " Terrific work of nonfiction. Partridge used period photographs to complement her narrative of the march from Selma to Montgomery. Material taken from first-hand interviews of participants also adds to the power of this story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kris | 6/8/2012

    " Amazing, amazing, amazing.... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Omi | 3/27/2012

    " whoa, paints quite the picture. covers something i havent really studied before. loved it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dolores | 9/25/2011

    " 4 1/2 stars. Great story and compelling pictures tell of the role young people played in this aspect of the civil right movement--earning African Americans their right to register to vote. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tweller83 | 8/26/2011

    " This is an excellent book, I just don't see too many middle school students (the intended audience) picking it up just for pleasure reading. An excellent example of the new common core standards for Literary Non-Fiction. Award winning. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kate Pierson | 5/24/2011

    " I read this short non-fiction book immediately (like, the same afternoon) after I finished Matterhorn. It helped me understand the racial tension during the Vietnam War that I had just finished reading about. Such interesting, inspiring times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 lola Franco | 5/9/2011

    " very interesting. sometimes too wordy, but a great pictorial essay on the civil rights movement. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Omi | 3/30/2011

    " whoa, paints quite the picture. covers something i havent really studied before. loved it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erick | 1/26/2011

    " Very powerful! The images and photographs are inspirational and controversial. Great book for celebrating Black history month or human rights. This book can also be used for lessons about humanity, differences between people, and how to love one another. Inspirational! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tiffany | 10/20/2010

    " Eye opening. Information that is important to know, in my opinion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 10/12/2010

    " Wonderful book for Black History month. The book is very moving, but I thought it was actually a little advanced for the group it is targeting. It is aimed at children, but some of the words would be difficult for school aged children to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 7/21/2010

    " Terrific work of nonfiction. Partridge used period photographs to complement her narrative of the march from Selma to Montgomery. Material taken from first-hand interviews of participants also adds to the power of this story. "

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About the Author
Author Elizabeth Partridge

Elizabeth Partridge grew up in a large, eccentric family in the San Francisco Bay Area. She graduated with a degree in women’s studies from UC Berkeley, and later studied traditional Chinese medicine in Oxford, England. She was an acupuncturist for more than twenty years before closing her medical practice to write full-time.

She has since published more than a dozen books, including Marching to Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Don’t You Grow Weary, and biographies of Dorothea Lange, Woody Guthrie, and John Lennon. Elizabeth is on the core faculty at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults.

About the Narrator

Alan Bomar Jones is an actor and audiobook narrator. He is an award-winning resident artist with the Human Race Theatre Company of Dayton, Ohio, and with the American Stage Theatre Company of St. Petersburg, Florida, and has lent his deep baritone voice to audiobooks such as Marching for Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Don’t You Grow Weary. Jones and his wife, Becky, live in Dayton, Ohio.