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Extended Audio Sample March Audiobook, by Geraldine Brooks Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.83 out of 53.83 out of 53.83 out of 53.83 out of 53.83 out of 5 3.83 (29 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Geraldine Brooks Narrator: Richard Easton Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2004 ISBN: 9780786553310
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As the North reels under a series of unexpected defeats during the dark first year of the war, one man leaves behind his family to aid the Union cause. His experiences will utterly change his marriage and challenge his most ardently held beliefs. Riveting and elegant as it is meticulously researched, March is an extraordinary novel woven out of the lore of American history.

From Louisa May Alcott's beloved classic Little Women, Geraldine Brooks has taken the character of the absent father, March, who has gone off to war, leaving his wife and daughters to make do in mean times. To evoke him, Brooks turned to the journals and letters of Bronson Alcott, Louisa May's father, a friend and confidant of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. In her telling, March emerges as an idealistic chaplain in the little known backwaters of a war that will test his faith in himself and in the Union cause as he learns that his side, too, is capable of acts of barbarism and racism. As he recovers from a near mortal illness, he must reassemble his shattered mind and body and find a way to reconnect with a wife and daughters who have no idea of the ordeals he has been through.

Spanning the vibrant intellectual world of Concord and the sensuous antebellum South, March adds adult resonance to Alcott's optimistic children's tale to portray the moral complexity of war, and a marriage tested by the demands of extreme idealism, and by a dangerous and illicit attraction. A lushly written, wholly original tale steeped in the details of another time, March secures Geraldine Brooks' place as an internationally renowned author of historical fiction.                            

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A beautifully wrought story…Gripping…A taut plot, vivid characters, and provocative issues.”

    Los Angeles Times Book Review

  • “Harrowing and moving…In her previous book, Year of Wonders, Geraldine Brooks proved herself to be a wonderful novelist. March has all the same virtues…casting a spell that lasts much longer than the reading of it.”

    Washington Post Book World

  • “Honorable, elegant, and true.”

    Wall Street Journal

  • “Brilliant…Geraldine Brooks’ new novel, March, is a very great book…Brooks has magnificently wielded the novelist’s license.”

    Chicago Tribune

  • “Wholly original…Deeply engaging.”

    Christian Science Monitor

  • “Inspired…A disturbing, supple, and deeply satisfying story, put together with craft and care and imagery worthy of a poet.”

    Cleveland Plain Dealer

  • “Louisa May Alcott would be well pleased.”

    Economist

  • Winner of the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet Meissner | 2/15/2014

    " The link to Little Women was not a draw for me. But I knew Brooks would write a good story. Here is an aspect of the Civil War that I haven't seen treated before: the experiment of running a plantation with freed slaves while the war was still being fought. The details of the fighting and suffering made the story very believable, and I was touched by the humanity built into the story, though March made a hapless hero. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary | 2/11/2014

    " I enjoy historical fiction and think the author pulled it out at the end, but many fans of "Little Women" are going to have trouble, as I did at first, with this portrayal of Marmee's husband. We know very little about Mr. March. Here the man is made real, with all the foibles that men seem to have. The author has based much of Mr March on Louisa May Alcott's father, A. Bronson Alcott. Evidently there is much to read and learn about Mr Alcott, he has his own papers and several books were written about him. Since "Little Women" was based on Louisa Alcott's own life, it makea sense that the book about Mr. March should be based on Ms. Alcott's own father. As with all historical fiction there is no way to portray the day to day life and conversations other than to make them up. Altho Ms. Brooks may have gone too far for many Alcott fans, I think she got it pretty close to right. I really did not care for the affair, but the rest of the book seems to have the voice we want to hear, the one that says there were some good, honest abolitionists and they were more than dedicated to their cause. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 2/8/2014

    " March is very well written, but extremely difficult to read in places, so I can't say I "enjoyed" it. Scenes of war and torture sicken me and I found myself having to skim some of the detailed descriptions of it. I'm also deducting points for sloppy editing, not only typos but historical inaccuracies. I can understand an author having to adjust some time frames for the sake of a fictional story, but to make reference to the April 19, 1775 Battle of Lexington and Concord as taking place in 1776 is absolutely inexcusable. Sorry, Geraldine, you lose points for this breach! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 2/3/2014

    " After reading Brooks' People of the Book, I was expecting great things from this book. The writing was superb, but I couldn't attach myself to any of the characters. I've never liked books of "war", so my bias may have played in my reading. Regardless, I am glad I have read another of Brooks' books and I look forward to the next one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennie | 1/29/2014

    " So good! It made me want to read Little Women again. Also, I greatly appreciated the author's afterword which detailed her research on the Alcott family and the civil war. Very well done. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brenda | 1/23/2014

    " Still thinking about the actions we take and the differences we can make. How hard it can be to see that making one small difference is all we can do and that it is enough. "Be kind, dream big, work hard and stay humble," Steve Meltzer says. When I reflect on those words and consider the characters in this book - together they make me want to be a better person. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Peggy | 1/17/2014

    " Excellent book about the reality of the Civil War. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kimberly | 11/4/2013

    " wonderfully written, very descriptive passages "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 10/20/2013

    " Very enjoyable. Best novel about Civil War I have read although I didn't read many. Best modern novel sequel to a classic I've read. pretty good story about a middle aged man as well. Recommend. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kerin | 10/20/2013

    " March, the main character, has a lot of love in him, which made me like him. Fantastic idea, to show what was happening to Mr. March. Learned some things about the Civil War too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Samantha | 8/29/2013

    " My first Brooks novel, love her work! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nancy | 4/21/2013

    " Here, Brooks allows the absent father of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March to tell his own tale, far from the cozy home front in Concord, Mass. Good story "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 3/18/2013

    " Will probably give it a 5 star, so far it's an excellent and thoughtful moral exploration of the South during slavery, but I don't have a sense of the whole story yet. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patty Gallagher | 2/13/2013

    " Definitely a different take on the whole Little Women story. It was a quick read and interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julia | 11/27/2012

    " So Good! Great Civil War fiction. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hallie Palladini | 11/24/2012

    " Miserable! Loathed it. Quit after page 124. Mad at myself for not stopping sooner. The story just wasn't engaging. Every time I picked it up, I realized I hadn't retained anything nor was I intrigued. Didn't love "Year of Wonders" either. I pledge to never read Geraldine Brooks again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Glenn Williams | 10/29/2012

    " Fans of Little Women (this is the back story of Rev. Marsh) seem to love this book. The rest of us...eh... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lindsay | 8/28/2012

    " The author explores an interesting perspective on a familiar tale. I found the personal references to abolitionists and transcendentalists interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cindy | 3/11/2012

    " Excellent, Excellent!!! Broke my heart, lifted my spirits. A must read!!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lyndsay | 5/22/2011

    " It took me a while to get into this book. But, half way through I couldn't put it down! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer | 5/20/2011

    " Brooks is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. I love books that elaborate on other great stories. Brooks did a great job of developing the father from Little Women and his back story. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lori | 5/20/2011

    " goodreads needs a "tried to read it but gave up" category. what happened here--i usually love her fiction. ugh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Judy | 5/15/2011

    " Good characters, ending a bit weak. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deb | 5/13/2011

    " Very clever plot to develop a well known literary character from a new perspective. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mindy | 5/9/2011

    " I enjoyed this book. It took me a little while to get into it, but I loved Brooks take on Mr. March and his life away from his Little Women. My mind always wonders about what the authors do not tell us. Obviously, so does Brooks and what her imagination provides is quite satisfying. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 5/7/2011

    " I think that Louisa May Alcott would have probably liked this story also. It is more or less the story of Mr. March as he had gone off to the war and what he incurred and all that he saw. He tries to live up to the man that he thinks he should be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 5/7/2011

    " I enjoyed this book but I don't understand why it got so much acclaim. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarahlynn | 5/4/2011

    " Well written, interesting on its own, but terrible as a sequel and offensive to this Alcott fan. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 5/3/2011

    " i loved this, especially because i read Little Women probably 20 times as a kid. "

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About the Author
Author Geraldine Brooks

Geraldine Brooks is the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of March, Year of Wonders, and People of the Book and the nonfiction works Nine Parts of Desire and Foreign Correspondence. She was previously a correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in Bosnia, Somalia, and the Middle East. Born and raised in Australia, she lives on Martha’s Vineyard with her husband, Tony Horwitz, and their two sons.

About the Narrator

Richard Easton received the 2001 Tony, Drama Desk, and Outer Critics Circle Awards for his performance in Tom Stoppard’s The Invention of Love. His other Broadway and London theater credits include Henry IV, Noises Off, Exit the King, The Misanthrope, Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado, Cock-a-Doodle Dandy, Hamlet, Back to Methuselah, The Country Wife, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, and The School for Scandal. His films include Finding Forester, Henry V, and Dead Again.