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Download Maneater: And Other True Stories of a Life in Infectious Diseases Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Maneater: And Other True Stories of a Life in Infectious Diseases Audiobook, by Pamela Nagami Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (497 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Pamela Nagami Narrator: Donna Rawlings Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2003 ISBN: 9781593970932
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Maneater is a personal account by a specialist who approaches her work like a forensic scientist or a case-hardened private eye. Dr. Pamela Nagami is a leading authority on infectious diseases and her stories will shock, amaze, and warn readers.

The patients in Maneater are ordinary Americans. When Danielle Jordan innocently ordered a salad for lunch in Puerta Vallarta she had no idea she had just become the "host" to an organism that six years later would grow into a worm and burrow into her brain.

Charlie Blair caught chicken pox, but he wasn't a kid, he was an adult, and that common childhood disease can attack a man and ravage his body until he looks like a third-degree-burn victim.

A small insect bite on Allan Roth's right foot made him a target for "flesh-eating strep." He shed his skin like a snake and a large area of tissue and skin was removed from his right thigh and lower abdomen.

Maneater will take readers on rounds with Dr. Nagami, where they will learn, from a safe distance, what the diseases are, what it's like to be a medical detective, and how it feels to make the medical and ethical decisions that can mean the difference between life and death.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katelyn | 2/8/2014

    " This is a really cool book written by Dr. Paula Nagami, who is an infectious disease specialist in California. Each chapter focuses on a particularly interesting/difficult case she was faced with, and together the chapters tell the story of her development as a doctor. This book was one of the things that really got me into wanting to go to med school. I think anyone who's pre-med would particularly enjoy it, but others would probably find it interesting, too. But be warned.. as you might have guessed from the title, this one's definitely not for the squeamish! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Liz | 1/22/2014

    " I like bitten better but this is also good. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 1/21/2014

    " Interesting infectious disease case studies. The author succeeds in being accurate without being sensational. I can only speak from the lab side, of course, but this is how it really goes! Sometimes you win, and sometimes you lose, but people work hard on all fronts to save lives. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill | 1/20/2014

    " A fantastic book to read. When I meet people on the street, I sometimes wonder how many of them have certain parasites that are affecting their behavior. About twenty percent of the people in this country have toxoplasma gondii living in their bodies. When it invades the brain, it can affect behavior. Read the book and think about it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heidi Ha | 1/18/2014

    " I loved this book. I was impressed by how well Nagami wove together her medical narrative with stories of how her career does and doesn't affect her family life. This book is engaging, well written, and highly satisfying to those of us who love medicine and the diagnostic process. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caroline | 1/15/2014

    " This book is at its best when Dr. Nagami writes about her diagnostic process. When she does, the book reads like an excellent detective novel. Fortunately, this was most of the book. Unfortunately, she also attempts to squeeze in some ethical/spiritual discussions, such as the totally weird essay near the beginning where she describes a religious awakening she had after seeing the hand of a fetus during an abortion procedure. I'm not even sure what she was getting at, but I almost stopped reading right there. If you have any fascination for the human body or natural history, or you just like a good mystery, you'll probably enjoy most of this book. However, for more graceful writings on ethical and spiritual matters in medicine (plus lots of fascinating anatomy and science-ey stuff), try the essays of Richard Seltzer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kait | 1/15/2014

    " Being in a medical field, I'm interested in the subject matter, but this is not a book for the faint of heart. Dr. Nagami spares no detail and I found the book to be a great read and quick as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bridget | 12/30/2013

    " I of course love this stuff, but it's a fun look into the world of infectious disease physicians, with real stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bill | 12/29/2013

    " A really entertaining read about some of the most unusual infectious disease cases seen by this esteemed doctor. Also, makes for a great conversation piece to have this one out on your coffee table. Not recommended for hypochondriacs! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bounphone | 12/18/2013

    " Nagami is successful at blending medical intrigue with stories of human compassion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trixie Jack | 11/27/2013

    " Different than what I'd expected after reading "Bitten." This serves as an autobiography of Nagami's medical career and her significant cases--those that both touched and horrified her. Excellently written, just like her other books. Highly recommend. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michelle Miranda | 11/25/2013

    " Didn't keep me wanting more. Will finish eventually. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vanessa | 10/26/2013

    " It was less gross stories and more inspirational, which wasn't what I was looking for. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 6/5/2013

    " I found this an interesting read. I have an interest in human biology and thought the amount of detective work involved in diagnosis was amazing.A quick book to read which not only described some interesting cases but also gave an insight into the doctors emotions "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Pancha | 12/12/2012

    " I'm being unfair to this book. It's not badly written, but it wasn't what I wanted to read/ It's more of a memoir couched in the frame of various medical cases. But I wanted a book all about diagnostics, diseases, and the treatments. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sab | 11/22/2012

    " Encephelopathy (I may have invented that word) is ICKY. And brain worms are crazy and awesome. This is a collection of essays about infectious burrowers and parasites and diseases and encephelitis, from one of my favorite medical writers ever. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cami | 11/20/2012

    " If you like the medical cases on the TV show House, then you might enjoy the strange cases recorded in this book. It's a nonfiction account of one diagnostician's cases. This is another one that I just loved, but it's not for everyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarra | 10/17/2012

    " Written by a medical doctor who specializes in infectious diseases, this book is a compilation of stories about her most interesting cases and patients. Including the titular story about a woman who was diagnosed with a brain tumor, who instead had a tapeworm burrowing into her brain. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Betsy Ashton | 8/23/2012

    " A good treatment of many of the viruses, bacteria and fungi that live among us. Dr. Nagami focuses on non-exotic conditions such as chickenpox, sepsis, and meningitis, rather than the exotics found in the tropics. A good compliment to Virus Hunter by C.J. Peters. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Erinthefunk | 5/3/2012

    " This book was more about the author's life experiences than the infectious diseases. She often wrote about her family and her emotions. The author also had a hard time staying focused, going into long tangents every few paragraphs. It's a shame, I do love a good tape worm story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly Jorgenson | 3/30/2012

    " Although I didn't like this one as much as How Doctors Think, it is along the same lines, except about infectious disease rather than general internal medicine. By the way, the title refers to a jewish woman with a pork tapeworm in her brain. "

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About the Author

Pamela Nagami, MD, is a practicing physician in internal medicine and infectious diseases with the Southern California Permanente Medical Group and a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at UCLA. She has made appearances on CNN and NPR. She lives with her husband and two children in Encino, California.