Losing My Cool: How a Fathers Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-hop Culture Audiobook, by Thomas Chatterton Williams Play Audiobook Sample

Download Losing My Cool: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-hop Culture Audiobook

Losing My Cool: How a Fathers Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-hop Culture Audiobook, by Thomas Chatterton Williams Play Audiobook Sample
FlexPass™ Price: $14.95
$7.95 for new members!(Includes UNLIMITED podcast listening) Add to Cart learn more
OR
Regular Price: $17.95 Add to Cart
Author: Thomas Chatterton Williams Narrator: Thomas Chatterton Williams Publisher: Penguin Audio Audio Length: Release Date: April 2010 Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download ISBN: 9781101196328

Publisher Description

Unabridged, 7 hours Read by the author A pitch-perfect account of how hip-hop culture drew in the author and how his father drew him out again-with love, perseverance, and fifteen thousand books.

Download and start listening now!

Quotes

  • “A provocative, intellectual memoir.” 

    - USA Today
  • “Williams blends Dostoevsky and Jay-Z in a compelling memoir and analysis of urban youth culture.” 

    - Booklist (starred review)

Awards

  • A 2010 San Francisco Chronicle Best Book for Nonfiction

Customer Reviews

Write a Review
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I zoomed through this in a day. I was reallyinterested in how the author changed his mindset from one of immersion in hip-hop culture to one focused on philosophy at the collegiate level. I would like some of my teaching colleagues to read it and see if there are any overall ideas that can come from the author's journey, or if it's just one person's (interesting) story of their personal paradigm shift. "

    - Sue, 1/26/2014
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I could hardly put it down - so revealing about a culture of which I know almost nothing. While I was fascinated by Thomas's courage to break from the very limiting hip hop culture and the courage to speak up in a big way about that- I also was fascinated by what his journey to a broader world can say to all of us but especially to all young people. But what do I know, read Trey's review from Sept 2011, as a young black man he can say what is good about the book. I love how he says it challenges him to read more, live more intentionally. As an old white woman, the book challenged me too - I am going to read Brothers Karamozov that has been unread in my iBook library for too long. What I keep thinking of is Thomas's almost grief at remembering the young, innocent, no make-up, shorts and tank top Stacey ( his high school girl) and how she was unable to escape her small fish bowl and at 20 had two children, no degree, no husband, no future. "

    - Jan, 1/25/2014
  • Overall Performance: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " On finding a deeper, more universal meaning of culture beyond hip hop through his father's library and influential teachers and friends. "

    - Rik, 1/25/2014
  • Overall Performance: 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " Mildly heartwarming as a father/son coming-of-age story, but lacking sufficient perspective or nuance in its portrayal of hip-hop culture. Far too many reductive, sweeping judgments of hip-hop's influence based on tenuous interpretations of scant anecdotal evidence. I'd highly recommend the The Beautiful Struggle by Ta-Nehisi Coates, for a much sharper take on similar subject matter. "

    - Jay, 1/14/2014
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Excellent read, perspective, wonderfully needed. Good insight into one young man's perspective/area of hip-hop culture and equally good insight into humanness, beyond any one culture or group. Read it. "

    - Indigotulip, 1/6/2014
  • Overall Performance: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " This book is fascinating. Following along as this young black man recreates himself. Inspirational. "

    - Brenda, 1/2/2014
  • Overall Performance: 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5

    " The idea was so amazing that I was certain I would enjoy it. However, all I really got from this was that his father taught him to value learning but not women. "

    - Amy, 12/26/2013
  • Overall Performance: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " What a combination -- views of hip-hop culture, the segregated South of the 1950s, New Jersey 'hoods of the 1980s, and Georgetown University; reflections on classic philosophy, and ultimately a wonderful emergence. "

    - Diane, 12/13/2013
  • Overall Performance: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " Excellent read, adding to my library for future reference, either by me or one of my sons. "

    - Brian, 7/28/2013
  • Overall Performance: 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " Some nicely observed, resonant passages about cultural dislocation. Great scene at Dean & Deluca's in Georgetown when he's asked to pick up a baguette and guesses (incorrectly) that what his friend wants is a small, French bag. "

    - Allison, 8/27/2012
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Something every son should read. Even if you aren't lucky enough to have a professor, the owner of 15,000 books or a man to sit you down and do two hours of tuition every night for a father, read how this man took these lessons and became someone his Dad is proud of. "

    - Rianna, 5/19/2012
  • Overall Performance: 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " Insightful and very reflective reading. Came close to the core of what I experienced when growing up in the areas he mentions. Little disappointed with the amount of profanity. "

    - Orville, 8/29/2011
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Won this book on First Reads. Great read. Other people have recommended it to me since I read it. So the word is out that this is a must-read. What are you waiting for? Thank you first Reads! "

    - Eileen, 7/24/2011
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Williams chronicles the influence rap and the rap culture had on his experiences, decisions, friends, education and family growing up. Williams was lucky to have parents who counter-balanced this culture, but he's aware of his many friends and acquantainces who were not so blessed! "

    - Khuck, 5/16/2011
  • Overall Performance: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " What a combination -- views of hip-hop culture, the segregated South of the 1950s, New Jersey 'hoods of the 1980s, and Georgetown University; reflections on classic philosophy, and ultimately a wonderful emergence. "

    - Diane, 3/23/2011
  • Overall Performance: 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " An intriguing story of one mans journey from hip hop to philosopher. "

    - Laura, 3/18/2011
  • Overall Performance: 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " An excellent read. Thomas really discusses what it means to be black in the hip-hop era without sounding PC about it. There are other books about hip-hop culture out there, but this one gives a personal spin that makes it better above the rest. "

    - Amber, 2/3/2011
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Interesting memoir about a young man who discovers the joy of learning and philosophy. A tribute to his patient, learned father, to great writers, to dedicated teachers and professors. "

    - Steve, 12/30/2010
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I really liked this memoir about the author's struggle to straddle popular culture and the world of education. It seemed to be very honest and I learned some things about what it must be like to be a young black man in America. "

    - Susan, 12/28/2010
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Thomas Chatterton Williams did a fine job writing this memoir, which depicts the cultural dynamic of the hip hop culture. He enlightens the reader with the impact of how the poetic word over beats cuts deeper than a good song. "

    - Eric, 12/24/2010
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Excellent read, perspective, wonderfully needed. Good insight into one young man's perspective/area of hip-hop culture and equally good insight into humanness, beyond any one culture or group. Read it. "

    - Indigotulip, 12/9/2010
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " LOVED this book. Everyone should read it. "

    - McNeil, 11/24/2010
  • Overall Performance: 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " the story carries it more than the voice. "

    - Leto, 10/14/2010
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Great book for a young man trying to establish his own identity with the peer pressure of the Hip-Hop Culture. It's explores the power of reading and philosphy and challenges the reader to think about their life and the world around you. "

    - Jerome, 9/28/2010
  • Overall Performance: 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Insightful look into the motives of this young man as he searches his identity through his mixed-race parentage and delves into his and his friends' motivations and various visions of success. "

    - Marilyn, 9/2/2010

About the Author

Thomas Chatterton Williams is a contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine and the author of Self-Portrait in Black and White and Losing My Cool. He is a 2019 New America Fellow and the recipient of a Berlin Prize.