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Download Longitudes & Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11 Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Longitudes & Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11 Audiobook, by Thomas L. Friedman
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,362 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas L. Friedman Narrator: Thomas L. Friedman Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2003 ISBN:
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In 2002, Thomas L. Friedman won his third Pulitzer Prize for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat after the attacks of September 11, 2001. This virtually unprecedented recognition underlines Friedman's unique ability to interpret and illuminate the world for American readers clearly, insightfully, and memorably.

Longitudes & Attitudes is made up of Friedman's New York Times columns, as well as a diary of his private experiences and reflections as he travels to Europe, the Mideast, and the Far East. He talks with the major players in the story and men and women in the street as he develops and refines his unique perspective on the new kind of war America finds itself fighting. And he helps us to understand who they are, and reassures us about who we are.

In the author's words, the result is a 'word album' that captures and preserves the raw, unpolished emotional and analytical responses that illustrate how I, and others, felt as we tried to grapple with September 11 and its aftermath as it continues to unfold. More than any other journalist writing today, Friedman gives voice to America's awakening sense of a radically new world and our own complex place in it. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rae | 2/18/2014

    " A collection of columns written just before and after 9/11. Though I didn't always share the author's political conclusions, I enjoyed this immensely. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison Shiloh | 1/16/2014

    " Jon recommended this book to offer some insight into his 9/11 and global war on terror perspective. I found it to be helpful snapshots of our new global era. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Devowasright | 1/8/2014

    " what i learned? change is possible, but will be a long time coming. the wrong people are in power everywhere you go.. enlightening, but depressing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Todd Johnson | 12/16/2013

    " Not a bad read but it sort of lost a lot of credibility with his position on the war. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Justin | 12/8/2013

    " I like friedman. I like his insights. read this. get a good take on whats happenin "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cliff | 12/6/2013

    " articulate, witty, metaphorical viewpoint of the world now. this guy is a great writer. and he ishes bush. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Becky Chambers | 12/2/2013

    " I'm one of many who think so highly of this reporter/author's reflective, well-articulated intellect. This book, made up of the columns he published about 9/11, is sharp and, I believe, essential reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Frank Cardenas | 12/2/2013

    " A lovely journey through different events that have shaped our history in very many ways, you are shocked sometimes, in others, you are just relieved of not being a part of those same events. This is what a journalist should be doing if they want to provide an interest account of our societies; highly interesting and I must say that it opened my eyes in very many ways. I might read it again later. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jchung7 | 10/9/2013

    " Better than The World is Flat, but Friedman has a tendency to annoy me, and I can't quite pinpoint why. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 7/9/2013

    " I've recently started Friedman's works. He's an intelligent man with a very important and interesting take on the world post-9/11. Agree with him or not, he's still a useful voice. I wish our government paid closer attention to his ideas. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carin | 5/22/2013

    " I listened to this on audio, abridged "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terrol Williams | 3/1/2013

    " Tremendously insightful and occasionally nearly prophetic. Friedman has the rare virtue of thinking very hard and seriously about politics without a political agenda, other than simply that of diagnosing and offering treatment options for serious foreign policy problems. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Becky | 2/13/2013

    " I really enjoyed this collection of Friedman's columns. He provides interesting perspectives of what was going on in the world before and after 9/11. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan | 12/2/2012

    " it's cool to read his articles back in 2002 and see all the ways and opportunities bush squandered that would have made this war not turn into total disaster. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin | 12/1/2012

    " If you like international politics this is informative. While I don't agree with all of his poltical views, I learned a lot. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christinaottis | 10/1/2012

    " What could be better than a collection of his New York Times articles? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 8/17/2012

    " Really does give sum up the new world we are living in. Can be a bit dry at times, but very important. At least you'll sound smart at a dinner party if you quote from this book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 threefishinatank | 8/4/2012

    " Probably worth just a few page. Dull and uninspiring. While focus on the Middle East, I doubt he spend much time considering and talking to ordinary people there in order to explore all the viewpoints. Blatantly biased as with most mainstream media. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daniel | 7/11/2012

    " Mostly his columns from right before 9/11 until 2002. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hollyscribe | 6/24/2012

    " so far fascinating as always "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 2/25/2012

    " Good read. This book is a collection of the authors columns in the New York Times. He has some very interesting ideas. Too bad those in power didn't listen to him. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annette | 2/17/2012

    " Written by a Pulitzer-Prize winning columnist, the author explores how globalization is changing the world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellen | 2/17/2012

    " Mr. Friedman's writings are carefully balanced "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael Harris | 1/26/2012

    " Read this shortly after it was published and was impressed with his understanding of the mid-East, the people and the politics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matt | 11/10/2011

    " Bought my wife this book for Christmas and watched it get drowned by melting oyster-ice-water. We dried it out. It survived. I read it: not so sure if I am a globalist. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 8/14/2011

    " I had a hard time making it through this one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christopher Hurtado | 7/12/2011

    " Longitudes and Attitudes Exploring the World After September 11 by Thomas L. Friedman (2002) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alecia | 1/25/2011

    " Very good information and well-written. It took me awhile to get through just because it is kind of heavey stuff and the very nature of it being columns made it easy to put it down. I like the author though and feel better informed about the Arab world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hollyscribe | 12/7/2010

    " so far fascinating as always "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 AmyLyn | 6/22/2010

    " I love reading Friedman's ideas. While I don't agree with all of them, they always give me something interesting to think about, and more often than not, he's spot on. I worried that this book might be out-dated, focusing as it does on the time right before and right after 9/11, but it wasn't. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 4/26/2010

    " Good read. This book is a collection of the authors columns in the New York Times. He has some very interesting ideas. Too bad those in power didn't listen to him. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 3/20/2010

    " I've recently started Friedman's works. He's an intelligent man with a very important and interesting take on the world post-9/11. Agree with him or not, he's still a useful voice. I wish our government paid closer attention to his ideas. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alison | 9/19/2009

    " Just a collection of his columns, which is helpful when putting the full context together, but not as fun as his new/unpublished works. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christinaottis | 8/25/2009

    " What could be better than a collection of his New York Times articles? "

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About the Author
Author Thomas L. Friedman

Thomas L. Friedman was UPI's Beirut correspondent from 1979 to 1981. In 1982, he became the New York Times Beirut bureau chief, winning a 1983 Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the Israeli invasion of Lebanon. In 1984, he moved to Jerusalem as the Times bureau chief, and in 1988 won a second Pulitzer Prize for reporting. He is also the author of the national bestseller The Lexus and the Olive Tree. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for his work on this book. He lives in Washington with his family.