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Download Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Garry Wills
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,435 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Garry Wills Narrator: Garry Wills Publisher: Phoenix Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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There is perhaps no more compelling example of the power of words than Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. In merely 272 words, Lincoln gave the nation a new birth of freedom by tracing its history to the Declaration of Independence, as well as incorporating elements of the Greek revival and Transcendentalism. Lincoln's entire life and deep political experience went into the creation of his revolutionary masterpiece. By examining both the Address and Lincoln in their historical and cultural context, noted historian Garry Wills breathes news life into words we thought we knew and reveals much about a President so easily mythologized but often misunderstood. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer W | 2/10/2014

    " That was a slog. I love the Gettysburg Address, I get misty-eyed every time I go to DC and see the Lincoln Memorial. I did learn a thing or two from this book, but I'd rather have my heartstrings pulled at the sheer beauty of the Address than understand the Roman roots or Transcendentalism or the Oedipus complex Lincoln may have suffered from. I hope to soon forget the heavy academia and get back to the joy of the awe-inspiring Gettysburg Address. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill W. | 2/8/2014

    " A thoughtful study of Lincoln's famed address dedicating the Gettysburg battleground cemetery little more than four months after the climactic struggle there in 1863. Wills' study includes a really fascinating comparison between Lincoln's address and the formal structures of historic Greek orations, especially eulogies and apologias; he makes a convincing case that in his speech Lincoln quite consciously struck parallels with classic Greek forms. Wills includes an extended and surprisingly interesting discussion of the history of cemeteries in America, as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan | 2/8/2014

    " Most interesting discussion of the influences on Lincoln that helped shaped the Gettysburg Address. I found the discussion of the 19th century Garden Cemetery movement most interesting, especially after having visited Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn. However, the most interesting discussion was about the way in which Lincoln changed the perception of the US Constitution, an argument which I believe is correct. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Terence | 2/3/2014

    " Perhaps I should put this in a trilogy including Explaining America and Inventing America. Here, Wills shows how Lincoln's Gettysburg Address foreshadowed our conception of the United States today (just a minor semantic example: prior to 1865, I would have written "these United States," as if I were referring to a collection of independent but allied states, not a nation). "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Steve Van Slyke | 1/10/2014

    " I could not finish it and I almost never give up on a book. I thought it was going to be a book about Lincoln and Gettysburg. It is, but it's also about a lot of other things that have only a slight tangential relationship to either of those subjects. If you want to try to understand the Gettysburg Address from every possible literary angle you can imagine, you might like this book. But if you, like me, were hoping for something that focused on Lincoln, the battles at Gettysburg, and his memorial address, you might be better off selecting something else. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brandon | 1/9/2014

    " A great book about a great writer and rhetorician. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeff | 1/5/2014

    " What an impressive book! What I particularly appreciated is the numerous different directions that Wills comes at the speech, the numerous contexts he places it in. It serves as an important reminder that important moments in history in fact participate in numerous histories, all at the same time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 1/5/2014

    " It was an interesting from the point of view that it takes one important historical event and analyzes it from every possible angle. It was interesting to learn how the 18th century romantic movement, oratory entertainment and the rural cemetary trend influenced Lincoln's speech. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich | 1/2/2014

    " Again, one that I picked up and put down. I did the same with his book on Ronald Reagan. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jon Edward | 12/20/2013

    " I need to read this again. I remember I enjoyed it, but I don't remember enough details to comment here. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 11/5/2013

    " A very good rhetorical analysis of one of the shortest and well-crafted speeches in American history. Wills takes great care to incorporate the past history and current events that influenced the gravity of Lincoln's arrangement and diction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg | 11/5/2013

    " History, context, and color, all in an amazingly compact package. If you want to understand what might have been the greatest American speech ever given, here it is. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Riley | 8/25/2013

    " I read this in preparation for a two-day trip to Gettysburg. The trip was great. The book wasn't. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 8/21/2013

    " An quick look at the culture and politics of 1863. What I found most interesting was the discussion of the ideals of Declaration of Independencs vs. the political compromises of the Constitution. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steph | 6/8/2013

    " At first a hard read, but gets better as you go along. Makes you completely rethink Lincoln. Brilliant. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tiffany Connors | 2/10/2013

    " The review for this book called it "painstakingly" researched, which is how I felt when reading it. Very cerebral. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sam | 4/8/2012

    " Amazing study of the Gettysburg address and how Lincoln (unintentionally) patterned it after the classic Greek funeral orations. It's amazing how much power is packed into those 200+ words. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rebekah | 7/16/2011

    " 3.5 stars. Some great contextual background info on the Gettysburg Address. But be forewarned that the writing is very dry and academic. If you don't mind that, then definitely give this book a read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pmercado | 4/16/2011

    " Lincoln put detail in every word he said. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 1/24/2011

    " An exploration of why this brief address changed the direction for the american war and ever after.
    Strongly recommended.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 1/1/2011

    " informative but a bit dense "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 12/23/2010

    " Everyone should read this book. Lincoln changed the cause of the war in 272 words. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robert | 11/29/2010

    " The myth is that Lincoln composed his Gettysburg address on the back of an envelope. Wills shows that it was the goal of his political life, one that his every action was aimed at.

    One of my all-time favorites. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Riley | 8/23/2010

    " I read this in preparation for a two-day trip to Gettysburg. The trip was great. The book wasn't. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul | 7/29/2010

    " A whole book about a 15 minute speech.

    That changed America!

    Only Gary Willis could pull it off! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laura | 11/3/2009

    " It was a rough read. Unless your really into Lincoln I would avoid it. The entire book is about the Gettysburg address. It was brutal; I am amazed I finished it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jonathan | 9/10/2009

    " Dry as dust. If a grad student turned this in as his master's thesis, you'd flunk him. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly | 3/16/2009

    " 272 perfect words. If you don't fully understand the greatness of this speech or the magic of this man, this is the book to read. Out of respect for his brevity, I'm going to try to imitate him here. The End. "

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About the Author
Author Garry Wills

Garry Wills is a historian and the author of the New York Times bestsellers What Jesus Meant, Papal Sin, Why I Am a Catholic, and Why Priests?, among others. A frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and other publications, Wills is a Pulitzer Prize winner and a professor emeritus at Northwestern University. He lives in Evanston, Illinois.