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Download Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Ann Vileisis
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (169 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ann Vileisis Narrator: Alex Day Publisher: Caravan Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2010 ISBN:
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Ask children where food comes from, and they'll probably answer, the supermarket. Ask most adults, and their replies may not be much different. Where our foods are raised and what happens to them between farm and supermarket shelf have become mysteries. How did we become so disconnected from the sources of our breads, beef, cheeses, cereal, apples, and countless other foods that nourish us every day?

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marion | 2/12/2014

    " I actually got to meet the author who is really nice and we chatted about environmental history (which is what this book is really) and how she became a freelance writer. Very interesting idea and very relevant as we begin to think about reducing our emissions and understanding how much energy goes into moving our food around the globe. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/25/2014

    " I never read non-fiction but this book jumped off the library shelf at me. It very interesting, even without a plot. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 1/24/2014

    " A really interesting and worthwhile read. Vileisis looks at changes in what Americans know about their food and how they know it (basically a shift from first-hand experience to relying on food scientists and food advertisements), especially in relation to social and economic trends (urbanization, industrialization, the growth of the advertising industry, women's changing roles in the home and in society at large). She has an agenda, as the final chapter makes very clear, but she uses documentation rather than polemic to make her points and it's pretty powerful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandy D. | 1/20/2014

    " Since I've read "Omnivore's Dilemma", "Perfection Salad", "An Edible History of Humanity" and many other books on agriculture and food in history, I thought this book would just recap stuff I already knew. To some extent, it did, but it presented it in a new and interesting way, looking at what Americans knew about their food and where it came from in the years 1790-2005. I was thrilled to see my old friend Martha Ballard in the first chapter (whom I blogged about here), and especially enjoyed the chapter on "A New Longing for Nature" and how it chronicled the origins of food advertising in the US. Occasionally, Vileisis's writing made me wish for an editing pen, but her material is fascinating and well-researched, and the writing was usually pretty good. If it were just a bit more inspired, this would have been a five star book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Claire | 1/19/2014

    " I HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone interested in food safety, economics, politics, or history--or just in a better understanding of what they eat and why. It's a very insightful history of the trends of food production and consumption, showing the evolution from local to global modes of distribution, from rural to urban culture, and from intimate consumer knowledge to a culture surrounding food consumption that promotes consumer ignorance. One of the main strengths of this book is that Vileisis takes a no-blame approach, acknowledging the strengths and time-period blinders of each new development in the food system while also pointing out the problems that persist into the present. The focus is on history, and the writing style is academic and slightly dry, but the subject is fascinating and highly relevant to today, detailing the synergies between advertising, feminism, perceptions of nature, corporate power, public safety, and numerous other fields as they developed in American culture. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Regina | 1/19/2014

    " Most comprehensive look at American food that I've read so far. Absolutely fantastic! Thoroughly researched, wonderfully written and engaging to history-buffs, foodies and book-worms alike. Very useful to read such a book when grappling with/thinking of/making judgments about American food today. I'm starting to think that knowing how we got here is perhaps even more important than knowing the "in's and out's" of the current ag industry-related dilemmas. I cannot recommend this book enough! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 April | 1/10/2014

    " Didn't really get through this one... too busy, or just not interesting enough? Determined to give it another try some day. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Margie | 12/31/2013

    " Drags a little in places, but full of history and illustrations on how we got to where we are now and some good suggestions on restoring health and sanity to the advertising, shopping, and growing of food. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 12/30/2013

    " This book has valuable documentation about American food history and our path to losing knowledge about what we eat. A good resource for information to support local food systems. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cyndi | 12/10/2013

    " This book was kind of a long way to go... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh | 12/6/2013

    " I really liked how this book presented a lot of information about how food used to get to peoples' tables, compared to how it gets there now. It was like having a nutritional anthropologist near by (good eats reference). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 12/1/2013

    " This book tells the story of how Americans lost their connection to their food. It tells about the rise of grocery stores. It was very informative. I used elements of it as the base for a Farm to Table class that I taught to 4-6 graders, even though it is at a much higher reading level. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 BW | 11/19/2013

    " Fascinating history of how we (or our kitchens) evolved. Definitely made me ponder (& appreciate) the difference between "food industry" and "agri-culture". "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nate | 6/26/2013

    " Eye opening. I am now a proud supporter of my local CSA and try to enjoy as many organic productsz as I can. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathely | 2/23/2013

    " The writing style was a little dry, but not too bad. Excellent information, though! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily | 2/22/2013

    " Covering the past two hundred or so years, Ann Vileisis traces how Americans became detached from food knowledge, linking dozens of historical vignettes into a narrative bemoaning the industrialized food system and sharing what modern day consumers can do to reconnect with their food. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jess | 2/12/2013

    " i really enjoyed this book, but it was dry. if you're not already interested in the topic it covers, chances are you won't want to sit through the whole thing. but if you care, it's a great thorough history of our food knowledge in this country. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy | 10/30/2012

    " An excellent book that helps us understand where our food comes from and how our relationship to it has changed over time. A great read and full of important stories about the nature of food and how we feed our families. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Betty | 10/7/2012

    " A lot of intresting stuff about history. I did not find her style of writing easy to read. But thats a personal preference, facinateing stuff. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angelina | 4/7/2011

    " If you are a foodie who loves history, then this is your book. I am the former, but not so much into the latter, so I found it a little dry. Michael Pollan is a lot more fun to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tracey | 3/14/2011

    " Lesley marked as to-read - on hold at lib for 4/8 "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angelina | 1/31/2011

    " If you are a foodie who loves history, then this is your book. I am the former, but not so much into the latter, so I found it a little dry. Michael Pollan is a lot more fun to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cyndi | 6/23/2010

    " This book was kind of a long way to go... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jess | 10/13/2009

    " i really enjoyed this book, but it was dry. if you're not already interested in the topic it covers, chances are you won't want to sit through the whole thing. but if you care, it's a great thorough history of our food knowledge in this country. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Betty | 7/20/2009

    " A lot of intresting stuff about history. I did not find her style of writing easy to read. But thats a personal preference, facinateing stuff. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh | 2/2/2009

    " I really liked how this book presented a lot of information about how food used to get to peoples' tables, compared to how it gets there now. It was like having a nutritional anthropologist near by (good eats reference). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erica | 12/16/2008

    " A fantastic, well researched book into the cultural shift of our eating habits spanning from the late 18th century to the present.

    Most of the books I've read on the subject don't cover the cultural shift, but focus primarily on the shift in ag, especially from the 1920s onward. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy | 11/24/2008

    " An excellent book that helps us understand where our food comes from and how our relationship to it has changed over time. A great read and full of important stories about the nature of food and how we feed our families. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 April | 10/7/2008

    " Didn't really get through this one... too busy, or just not interesting enough? Determined to give it another try some day. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 BW | 9/3/2008

    " Fascinating history of how we (or our kitchens) evolved. Definitely made me ponder (& appreciate) the difference between "food industry" and "agri-culture". "

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