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Download Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back (Unabridged), by Ann Vileisis
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (169 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ann Vileisis Narrator: Alex Day Publisher: Caravan Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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Ask children where food comes from, and they'll probably answer, the supermarket. Ask most adults, and their replies may not be much different. Where our foods are raised and what happens to them between farm and supermarket shelf have become mysteries. How did we become so disconnected from the sources of our breads, beef, cheeses, cereal, apples, and countless other foods that nourish us every day?

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Marion | 2/12/2014

    " I actually got to meet the author who is really nice and we chatted about environmental history (which is what this book is really) and how she became a freelance writer. Very interesting idea and very relevant as we begin to think about reducing our emissions and understanding how much energy goes into moving our food around the globe. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Stephanie | 1/25/2014

    " I never read non-fiction but this book jumped off the library shelf at me. It very interesting, even without a plot. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Janet | 1/24/2014

    " A really interesting and worthwhile read. Vileisis looks at changes in what Americans know about their food and how they know it (basically a shift from first-hand experience to relying on food scientists and food advertisements), especially in relation to social and economic trends (urbanization, industrialization, the growth of the advertising industry, women's changing roles in the home and in society at large). She has an agenda, as the final chapter makes very clear, but she uses documentation rather than polemic to make her points and it's pretty powerful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Sandy D. | 1/20/2014

    " Since I've read "Omnivore's Dilemma", "Perfection Salad", "An Edible History of Humanity" and many other books on agriculture and food in history, I thought this book would just recap stuff I already knew. To some extent, it did, but it presented it in a new and interesting way, looking at what Americans knew about their food and where it came from in the years 1790-2005. I was thrilled to see my old friend Martha Ballard in the first chapter (whom I blogged about here), and especially enjoyed the chapter on "A New Longing for Nature" and how it chronicled the origins of food advertising in the US. Occasionally, Vileisis's writing made me wish for an editing pen, but her material is fascinating and well-researched, and the writing was usually pretty good. If it were just a bit more inspired, this would have been a five star book. "

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