Extended Audio Sample

Download Keep the Change: A Clueless Tipper's Quest to Become the Guru of the Gratuity Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Keep the Change: A Clueless Tippers Quest to Become the Guru of the Gratuity (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Steve Dublanica
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (353 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Steve Dublanica Narrator: Dan John Miller Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2010 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

Tipping is huge in America. Almost everyone leaves at least one tip every day. More than five million American workers depend on them, and we spend $66 billion on tips each year. And everyone recognizes that queasy feeling - in bars and restaurants, barbershops and beauty parlors, hotels and strip clubs, and everywhere else - when the check arrives or the tip jar looms. Omnipresent yet poorly understood, tipping has worked its way into almost every part of daily life.

In Keep the Change, bestselling author Steve Dublanica dives into this unexplored world, in a comical yet serious attempt to turn himself into the Guru of the Gratuity. As intrepid and irreverent as Michael Moore or A. J. Jacobs, Dublanica travels the country to meet strippers and shoeshine men, bartenders, bellhops, bathroom attendants, and many others, all in an effort to overcome his own sweaty palms when faced with those perennial questions: Should I tip? How much? Throughout, he explores why tipping has spread; he explains how differences in gender, age, ethnicity, and nationality affect our attitudes; and he reveals just what the cabdriver or deliveryman thinks of us after we've left a tip.

Written in the lively style that made Waiter Rant such a hit, Keep the Change is a fun and enlightening quest that will change the way we think - and tip.

Download and start listening now!

BK_BRLL_002544

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Raven | 2/14/2014

    " I read "Keep the Change," a follow up to Dublanca's first book "Waiter Rant" because I was very entertained the first time around. This work takes on a more investigative journalistic approach, which I found enjoyable and surprisingly informative. Discussing the economy of gratuity, Dublanca's quest to become a Tipping Guru took him to some of the seedier sides of our culture, exposing the both the necessity and etiquette of greasing the palms for those who provide services many often take for granted. As a laymen who has never worked in the service industry, I found how much tipped employees not only rely on their gratuities, and was immediately wracked with some guilt for slights dues to my ignorance. Dublanca's exploration of the history of tipping and the importance it plays in society really opened my eyes to this often overlooked aspect of our culture and I feel more informed and better prepared next time I am in line at Starbucks or handing my keys over to the valet! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andrea | 2/2/2014

    " This book made me feel guilty for all the times I didn't tip people. In my defense, I didn't know about half of them. Apparently you should tip everyone just to be safe. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary Lou | 1/28/2014

    " Not a great writer but some interesting stuff in this book. I especially liked the chapter on strip clubs in Vegas. Learned a lot about the "tipping" that goes on among everyone who works in one! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Swan | 1/18/2014

    " Interesting book on tipping and standards but I found him annoying by the end. His personality was much more appealing in waiter rant. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kristina | 12/20/2013

    " Dublanica's style made the ending of every chapter predictable. Halfway through the book I felt: "OK. I get it. Enough already." Appendix C (about tipping and race) was a good surprise though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Az | 12/11/2013

    " You could note any number of flaws with this book, as it attempts to provide conclusive evidence with flawed research. But you know what, I like his tone. And how he doesn't shame sex workers, or the people who visit them. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joan | 11/19/2013

    " Could have done without the swearing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda | 9/29/2013

    " This book is just as good as his first one, Waiter Rant. I enjoyed it immensely, but may be biased since we met with the author and are featured in the book. A great insight into the world of tipping and why we should always tip! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jasmin | 7/8/2013

    " loved this one even more than his first book "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 6/18/2013

    " An interesting book all about tipping - who gets tips, how much and why, interwoven with stories about those who work for tips. An overall good bok. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Renee | 11/17/2012

    " This book looks into the history and current practice of tipping. It's by the same author who wrote "Waiter Rant" which I liked better, but it's still an interesting read. By the way, it is actually necessary to tip on drinks, something I was glad to see confirmed. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 9/12/2012

    " I liked this much better than his previous book, "Waiter Rant." It was entertaining and educational - call me a cultural ignoramus, but I did not know you were supposed to tip hotel housekeepers. NOTED! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dana | 3/18/2012

    " Loved the history of tipping and the correlation he makes at the end. I hereby apologize to every my Starbucks barista, hotel housekeeper, and furniture delivery worker I have ever interacted with... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kellian Kennedy | 10/5/2011

    " A very useful and interesting journey into American tipping practices. I enjoyed the evaluation of the lesser known tipping practices, and the idea of tipping karma. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rebecca | 9/13/2011

    " I was very excited to read this book after finishing Waiter Rant. Unfortunately I was extremely disappointed. The writing wasn't as good and I felt pushed into tipping when it isn't always appropriate. Let me know what you think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Swan | 5/5/2011

    " Interesting book on tipping and standards but I found him annoying by the end. His personality was much more appealing in waiter rant. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 5/3/2011

    " Not a great writer but some interesting stuff in this book. I especially liked the chapter on strip clubs in Vegas. Learned a lot about the "tipping" that goes on among everyone who works in one! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eileen | 4/20/2011

    " About all things relating to gratuities. Some of it was interesting, got kind of bored after a while. Took away a few interesting facts which will probably stay with me. Lexus drivers are bad tippers. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gina | 4/10/2011

    " This is a 3+ book.

    I found this book while browsing the new non-fiction at the library. The writing is funny while informational. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Angela | 3/5/2011

    " Maybe not quite as engrossing a subject as Waiter Rant, but informative. Everyone can stand to learn something from this book. I still enjoy the author's writing style, very easy to read, and many of his interview subjects I think would be fascinating outside of the scope of their interviews. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kyle | 2/27/2011

    " A very enlightening (and entertaining) book that demystifies the world of tipping! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Manintheboat | 2/5/2011

    " I too believed that one tips the bartender $1 per drink, but the Jack n Cokes at The Skaylark are $4.75, so I'm not doing too bad. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Monique | 1/24/2011

    " I didn't know squat about tipping. I just thought the standard 20% This book explains the why and what for. Even how tipping benifits you. I learned a lot.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robin | 1/10/2011

    " It appears the author is a spoiled lout whom I hope never to meet in person. But the book is very interesting and I did learn some things. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Steve DublanicaSteve Dublanica is the bestselling author of Waiter Rant, which spent twelve weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. He lives in the New York metropolitan area with his joint-custody dog Buster.
About the Narrator

Dan John Miller is an American actor and musician. In the Oscar-winning Walk the Line, he starred as Johnny Cash’s guitarist and best friend, Luther Perkins, and has also appeared in George Clooney’s Leatherheads and My One and Only, with Renée Zellweger. An award-winning audiobook narrator, he has garnered multiple Audie Award nominations, has twice been named a Best Voice by AudioFile magazine, and has received eight AudioFile Earphones Awards and a Listen-Up Award from Publishers Weekly.