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Extended Audio Sample JPod, by Douglas Coupland Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (9,310 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Douglas Coupland Narrator: Marc Cashman Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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JPod, Douglas Coupland’s most acclaimed novel to date, is a lethal joyride into today’s new breed of tech worker. Ethan Jarlewski and five coworkers whose surnames begin with “J” are bureaucratically marooned in jPod, a no-escape architectural limbo on the fringes of a massive Vancouver game design company. The jPodders wage daily battle against the demands of a boneheaded marketing staff, who daily torture employees with idiotic changes to already idiotic games. 

Meanwhile, Ethan’s personal life is shaped (or twisted) by phenomena as disparate as Hollywood, marijuana grow-ops, people-smuggling, ballroom dancing, and the rise of China. JPod's universe is amoral, shameless, and dizzyingly fast-paced.

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Quotes & Awards

  • JPod is a sleek and necessary device: the finely tuned output of an author whose obsolescence is thankfully years away.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • "Zeitgeist surfer Douglas Coupland downloads his brain into JPod."

    Vanity Fair

  • "It's time to admire [Coupland's] virtuoso tone and how he has refined it over 11 novels. The master ironist just might redefine E. M. Forster's famous dictate 'Only connect' for the Google age."

    USA Today

  • “It’s to [Coupland’s] credit that in JPod he’s still nimble enough to take the post-modern man—too young for Boomer nostalgia and too old for youthful idealism—and drown his sorrows in a willful, joyful satire that revels in the same cultural conventions that it sends up.”

    Rocky Mountain News

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Mike Peckford | 2/10/2014

    " My second coupland book. Much better than gen-x. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Yasmin | 1/28/2014

    " Recently re-read this. I was surprised how much of the plot I didn't remember and how good it is. Definitely one of my favorite books and one of Coupland's best. He hits the nail on the head about life in the twenty-first century. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Todd | 1/22/2014

    " It's hard to decide on 3 or 4 stars for this book. On the one hand it's incredibly humorous - on the other it's really only funny if you're a software engineer of some sort. On the one hand it's literary style is original and competent, on the other hand it can get in the way of it's own narrative. Nonetheless, I enjoyed it, and it's a solid, albeit SUPER nerdy read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 by Marina Keenan | 1/21/2014

    " I am a fan of Coupland and I have read everything he has ever published, but it is clear after reading Jpod that he's been in Vancouver too long and needs to get out for a weekend, if only to try another city's dope and take-out. Jpod is supposed to be the sequel to Microserfs, but Coupland wastes this one hunting-and-pecking for Gen Y/Echo Boom culture like a noob coder; he doesn't see that the map is not the terrain. So what if the main character's Mom is growing and selling weed, Dad is dating his son's classmates, and his boss is being manipulated by a billionaire Asian criminal? Sure it's shocking, but is this the zeitgeist, or just, "Extreme Vancouver?" Coupland needs to look beyond the electronic globe his own character creates (he writes himself into the book and creates an interactive-globe killer app that saves the group from techie overwork and under-compensation); that metaphor for an impersonal electronic world fails because his characters never break through as real people with any purpose. Gen Y's struggle to assert "authorship", i.e. identity in a world where society = electronic gaming, should have been inherent in the characters' personal lives and struggles; instead, Coupland builds them with thin and obvious devices like everyone playing the "what-superpower-would-you-have" game. In the end, I am not sure this story or these characters matter, and I think they may as well not have been. Phooey, Doug, Phoeey I say! Has the well run dry? "

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